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Results: 2

1.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults.

Proper ascending aortic evaluation. (A) If intact, the diameter (d) of the aorta should be recorded. (B) Additional measures of size (h=height) and other pertinent findings should be noted. (C) Six sections of the aorta, fitting into two tissue cassettes, should be evaluated for histologic changes.

Deepali Jain, et al. Cardiovasc Pathol. ;20(1):15-25.
2.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults.

Histology of ascending aortas. (A) Normal ascending aorta showing dense elastic fibers in a young adult (Movat pentachrome, original magnification, ×10). (B) Ascending aorta with CMD and elastic fiber loss, characteristic of many genetic forms of aortic disease (Movat pentachrome, original magnification, ×10). (C) Ascending aorta from a subject with LDS with generalized widening of intralamellar spaces, typical of DMD (hematoxylin–eosin, original magnification, ×15). (D) Ascending aorta with CMD secondary to focal interlamellar degeneration (hematoxylin–eosin, original magnification, ×10).

Deepali Jain, et al. Cardiovasc Pathol. ;20(1):15-25.

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