Results: 4

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Domain architectures of the (A) LXCXE motif and the (B) BEN domain in DNA viruses. From: Diversity and evolution of chromatin proteins encoded by DNA viruses.

Standard nomenclature is used for domain names, poorly characterized globular domains are denoted as ‘X’. The architectures are labeled with the gene and species names of the virus in which they are found, separated by an underscore.

Robson F. de Souza, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. ;1799(3-4):302-318.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Diversity of chromatin protein families among different lineages of dsDNA viruses. From: Diversity and evolution of chromatin proteins encoded by DNA viruses.

Labels at the top identify different genome size classes. Family names are the same as used in the main text and structural folds are given between parentheses. For the purpose of dividing the protein families according to spread and abundance among viral lineages (indicated by color codes), the Mimivirus was considered a lineage related to phycodnaviruses. Detailed description of each protein family is provided in the main text. Capsid/virion diameter data from [165–169].

Robson F. de Souza, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. ;1799(3-4):302-318.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Cartoon representations and topology diagrams of various treble clef fold domains found in dsDNA viruses. From: Diversity and evolution of chromatin proteins encoded by DNA viruses.

Secondary structure elements of the shared core of the treble-clef fold are shown in color; helices are colored red and strands green. The characteristic N-terminal region of the treble-clef is colored blue. The unique helices and strands present only in certain representatives of the fold are shown in grey. Topology diagrams in the center depict the common and derived regions in the structures. The papillomavirus E6 Zn-finger is related to the LIM domain and the papillomavirus E7 Zn-finger is closest to the pygopus-like PHD fingers.

Robson F. de Souza, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. ;1799(3-4):302-318.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Gene neighborhoods and domain architectures of various chromatin domains found in double stranded DNA viruses. From: Diversity and evolution of chromatin proteins encoded by DNA viruses.

Genes are depicted as boxed arrows, with the arrowhead pointing from the 5’ to the 3’ end of the open reading frame. Domain architectures are shown as cartoon representations. Standard nomenclatures are used for both gene and domain names. Gene neighborhoods are labeled with the gene and species names of the primary domain discussed in the panel, separated by an underscore. The bar-graph in the top panel shows the genome position frequency of the SAP domain in completely sequenced viral genomes with linear chromosomes. There is a significant preference for positioning of this domain at one terminus of the viral chromosomes.

Robson F. de Souza, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. ;1799(3-4):302-318.

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