Results: 3

1.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: GATA3 in Development and Cancer Differentiation: Cells GATA Have It!.

GATA3 is sufficient to induce differentiation in carcinoma cells. Primary cultures of adenocarcinomas from MMTV-PyMT mice were transduced with retrovirus containing either empty vector (control) or GATA3 and transplanted into wild-type mice. Tumors were grown for 6 weeks. H&E staining (A,B) and immunocytochemistry for β-casein (C,D) show that tumor cells expressing GATA3 differentiate and form milk proteins. Schematic shows that GATA3 tumors not only form lumens (E,F), but also express differentiation markers and basement membrane components such as perlecan (marked in blue). Parts (A–D) are reprinted from with permission from Elsevier. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

Jonathan Chou, et al. J Cell Physiol. ;222(1):42-49.
2.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: GATA3 in Development and Cancer Differentiation: Cells GATA Have It!.

Functional domains in the mouse GATA-binding protein 3. GATA3 is composed of 443 amino acids, and contains two amino terminal transactivation domains, TA1 and TA2, and two zinc-finger motifs, ZF1 and ZF2, which are followed immediately by a conserved basic region. The distal zinc-finger motif (ZF2) binds to DNA containing the canonical GATA motif, (A/T)GATA(A/G). The proximal zinc-finger motif (ZF1) seems to have broader specificity. Mutation of the amino acids KRR, which lies in the first basic region in between ZF1 and ZF2, confers dominant negative or hypomorphic function. The second basic region contains two important motifs: the YxKxHxxxRP motif (in which x denotes any amino acid) mediates DNA binding and the NRPL motif forms the interface between two GATA molecules, indicating that GATA3 mayhomo-or heterodimerize. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

Jonathan Chou, et al. J Cell Physiol. ;222(1):42-49.
3.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: GATA3 in Development and Cancer Differentiation: Cells GATA Have It!.

GATA3 in normal mammary gland development. A: A schematic representation of the mammary epithelium and stroma during mammary gland development. The luminal epithelial cells, highlighted in yellow, express GATA3 while the myoepithelial cells, highlighted in red, express very low levels of GATA3. The terminal end bud (TEB) invades through the stroma during pubertal development, and consists of both GATA3-negative cap cells and GATA3-positive cells. The stroma consists of a heterogeneous cell population of fibroblasts, adipocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, and mast cells, and plays an important role in facilitating branching and ductal elongation. Arrow points to the direction of TEB migration. B: Whole-mount carmine red staining of mouse mammary glands from 5-week-old wild-type (left) and GATA3 conditional knock-out (CKO) (right) mice outlines the epithelium. In the wild-type mammary gland, the epithelium has invaded into the stroma (from left to right) past the lymph node (LN), with multiple TEBs formed. Inset shows bifurcating TEBs. In contrast, the GATA3-CKO mammary gland shows a defect in epithelial invasion into the stroma, without prominent TEBs formed. Inset shows a lack of TEBs at the distal end of the epithelium. Scale bar corresponds to 3 mm. Part (A) is modified from and (B) is reprinted from with permission from Elsevier. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

Jonathan Chou, et al. J Cell Physiol. ;222(1):42-49.

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