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Results: 3

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Regions of Interest Used to Extract the D2/D3 Receptor and Dopamine Transporter Measures. From: Evaluating Dopamine Reward Pathway in ADHD.

The regions of interest for the midbrain are obtained in several planes, and the shadow is projected to the axial image shown in the figure, which explains why the third ventricle is covered by the region. The x coordinate maps the left-right position; they coordinate, the anterior-posterior position; and the z coordinate, the superior-inferior position.

Nora D. Volkow, et al. JAMA. ;302(10):1084-1091.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Regions in the Brain in Which Dopamine Measures Were Lower in Participants With ADHD Than in Controls. From: Evaluating Dopamine Reward Pathway in ADHD.

A, Regions showed significantly lower dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in participants with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than in controls (obtained from [11C]raclopride images). B, Regions showed significantly lower dopamine transporter availability in the participants with ADHD than in controls (obtained from [11C]cocaine images). Significance corresponds to P<.005, cluster >100 voxels. The yellow regions identify the areas in the brain for which the measures differed between controls and participants with ADHD. The location of the region that differed was similar for the dopamine D2/D3 receptor and for the dopamine transporter and included the locations of the left ventral striatum (including accumbens and ventral caudate), left midbrain, and left hypothalamus. The z coordinate maps the superior-inferior position.

Nora D. Volkow, et al. JAMA. ;302(10):1084-1091.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Regression Slopes Between Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor and Dopamine Transporter Availability and Scores on Attention. From: Evaluating Dopamine Reward Pathway in ADHD.

The Dimension of the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)–symptoms and Normal-behavior (SWAN) rating scale uses a positive scale for symptoms (1 to 3) and a negative scale for the opposite of the symptoms (−1 to −3) ranging from “far below average” to “far above average.” The negative numbers in some of the regions show that the ratio of the specific to nonspecific binding of the radioligand is very low for these regions. The solid line in each scatter plot corresponds to the regression line (line of best fit).

Nora D. Volkow, et al. JAMA. ;302(10):1084-1091.

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