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Results: 12

1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

The operating principle of the ISS system

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
2.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

Raster flycutting on Nanotech 250UPL. Red coordinate arrows indicate the X, Y, and Z axes of the machine. C axis is not used in raster flycutting mode.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
3.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

Slicing component surface height profile. The roughness data is obtained by the removal tilt. Surface roughness RMS value = 6 nm.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
4.
Fig. 11

Fig. 11. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

ISS images of green fluorescent beads. The raw image is obtained using a 16-bit CCD camera with 6s integration time. The bead's spectrum is obtained from point A in the re-constructed image.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
5.
Fig. 12

Fig. 12. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

ISS images of red and yellow fluorescent beads. The raw image is obtained using a 16-bit CCD camera with 2s integration time. The yellow bead's spectrum is from point B in the re-constructed image and the red bead's spectrum is from point C in the re-constructed image.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
6.
Fig. 10

Fig. 10. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

The PSF of a single slice from an undispersed image. The camera pixel size equals 9μm. The x and y positions indicate the location of this slice image in the CCD camera's global coordinates.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
7.
Fig. 8

Fig. 8. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

Overlap of the FOVs on the CCD camera. Each reimaging lens set images the corresponding pupil in the pupil plane (see Fig. 3(b)). The FOVs of adjacent reimaging lens are overlapping to fully utilize the CCD area. The image slicer itself creates a field stop allowing the overlap.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
8.
Fig. 7

Fig. 7. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

Reimaging lenses and mount. Fig. (a) shows the photographic picture of the whole piece. There are 25 tubes inside this mount. Each tube holds a reimaging lens set. Fig. (b) gives the cross section view of a single tube. 60mm F.L. achromatic doublets are mounted at the back of the tube (facing the pupil), while -12.5mm F.L. achromatic doublets are mounted at the front of tube (facing the image plane). The F.L. of this reimaging lens set is 350mm.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
9.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

The profile of image slicer. Fig. (a) and (b) are photographic pictures. In (a), the sliced Rice logo letters can be directly seen in the reflection direction. In (b), a quarter is placed as the reference to show the size of the image slicer (16mm×16mm). Fig. (c) is a three dimensional picture of a portion of the image slicer obtained by Zygo white light interferometer.

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
10.
Fig. 9

Fig. 9. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

A 1951 USAF target undispersed image. The raw image (a) is obtained using a 16-bit camera without binning (pixel size = 9μm). Fig. (b) is the reconstructed image. For comparison purposes, an image of the same bars is captured at the microscope side port directly using a monochromatic camera. The imaging result is shown in Fig. (c). The top bars in the FOV belong to Group 7, Element 6 (bar width = 2.19 μm).

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
11.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

Pupil selection principle. Fig. (a) shows one of the image slicer's repeating blocks, and Fig. (b) shows the corresponding pupil plane. In (a) the arrow in each slicing component represents the tilt direction (there is no arrow on slicing component 13 because it has no tilt) and the sequential number represents the slicing component index. Light reflected from each slicing component in this block will enter the corresponding pupil in (b). The dimensions of slicing components in the Fig. are scaled to show their features. In the prototype, the slicing component is 16mm in length (Y direction), and 160μm in width (X direction).

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.
12.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Compact Image Slicing Spectrometer (ISS) for hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy.

ISS system setup. Fig. (a) is a photograph of the system. A switchable dual-port image relay is mounted on the microscope side port. One port is connected to the ISS system. The other can be used as a direct imaging port to provide a standard image or reference spectrum. Fig. (b) is the schematic layout. Light rays reflected from different tilted slicing components are labeled with different colors. Note that only tilts with respect to the y-axis are shown in the Fig..

Liang Gao, et al. Opt Express. ;17(15):12293-12308.

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