We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 5

1.
FIG. 3.

FIG. 3. From: Scaled Cortical Impact in Immature Swine: Effect of Age and Gender on Lesion Volume.

Intermediate-power view showing the border between normal cortex (left) and area of the lesion (right) surrounded by an area of edematous white matter (middle). The border is marked by the arrow (H&E stain, original magnification 100 ×; scale bar = 100 μm).

Symeon Missios, et al. J Neurotrauma. 2009 November;26(11):1943-1951.
2.
FIG. 2.

FIG. 2. From: Scaled Cortical Impact in Immature Swine: Effect of Age and Gender on Lesion Volume.

Photographs of H&E-stained coronal sections that demonstrate cortical surface contusion injury with dots outlining a portion of the injury on the rostral gyrus in a brain from a 7-day-old pig (infant: A), a 1-month-old pig (toddler: B), and a 4-month-old pig (early adolescent: C) collected 7 days after scaled cortical impact.

Symeon Missios, et al. J Neurotrauma. 2009 November;26(11):1943-1951.
3.
FIG. 5.

FIG. 5. From: Scaled Cortical Impact in Immature Swine: Effect of Age and Gender on Lesion Volume.

Concentrations of testosterone (A) and 17β-estradiol (B) in venous plasma collected post-anesthetic induction, prior to scaled cortical impact in male and female pigs 5–7 days, 1 month, or 4 months old. a,bMeans ± SEM with different letters differ significantly (p < 0.05). Infant males (5–7 days old) had significantly higher (p < 0.0001) concentrations of testosterone and 17β-estradiol than their female counterparts and 1-month-old and 4-month-old subjects.

Symeon Missios, et al. J Neurotrauma. 2009 November;26(11):1943-1951.
4.
FIG. 1.

FIG. 1. From: Scaled Cortical Impact in Immature Swine: Effect of Age and Gender on Lesion Volume.

(A) Schematic representation of the cortical injury device. (B) Illustration of the scaled indentor tips and their use in histological sampling. The tip diameter and indentation depth increase in proportion to increases in brain dimension with age, from youngest (left) to oldest (right), as described in the text. Histological samples were taken at the 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% regions of tissue under the indentor tip for each subject (reprinted with permission from the Journal of Neurosurgery, www.thejns-net.org).

Symeon Missios, et al. J Neurotrauma. 2009 November;26(11):1943-1951.
5.
FIG. 4.

FIG. 4. From: Scaled Cortical Impact in Immature Swine: Effect of Age and Gender on Lesion Volume.

Lesion size as a percentage of the contralateral hemisphere 7 days after scaled cortical impact of the rostral gyrus in 5- to 7-day-old, 1-month-old, and 4-month-old pigs. The letters a, b, c are used to label the groups and indicate when the difference among groups is statistically significant (p < 0.05). Groups are different when they do not share a common letter (e.g., a is different from b, but there no significant difference between a and a,b, or b and a,b). (A) Lesion size in 5- to 7-day-old (n = 26), 1-month-old (n = 19), and 4-month-old (n = 22) pigs. Lesion size increased correspondent with age. (B) The same subjects shown in A, but separated by gender. Lesion size in 5- to 7-day-old females (n = 13) and males (n = 13), 1-month-old females (n = 10) and males (n = 9), and 4-month-old females (n = 12) and males (n = 10). Lesion size was greater in 5- to 7-day-old than in 1-month-old males, but not females of the corresponding ages.

Symeon Missios, et al. J Neurotrauma. 2009 November;26(11):1943-1951.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk