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1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

The respiration response function (Birn et al., 2008).

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
2.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Voxel-wise comparison between the cross-correlation magnitudes of PETCO 2 and RVTRRF for one subject (Subject 4).

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
3.
Figure 10

Figure 10. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Comparison between PETCO2 and BH latency maps for one subject. (A) PETCO2 and BH latency maps [sec]. (B) Correlation between the PETCO2 and BH latency maps was significant (r=0.75).

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
4.
Figure 7

Figure 7. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Group-level (n=7) random-effects analysis of the BOLD signal changes explained by the model containing both PETCO2 and RVTRRF (shown at p<0.01 uncorrected).

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
5.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Correlations between end-tidal gas and respiratory belt measurements for all subjects. The y-axis represents the maximum magnitude of the cross-correlation between the indicated pair of signals. The maximum cross-correlations between RVT and PETCO2, and between RVTRRF and PETO2, are negative; the absolute value is shown for ease of comparison.

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
6.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Comparison between the effects of 4 respiratory measures (PETCO2, PETCO2-GAM, PETO2, RVTRRF) in the brain. For each respiratory measure, the sum of Z-scores across voxels for which Z>5.3, normalized by the total number of voxels in the brain, is plotted.

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
7.

Figure 4. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Percentage of variance explained by the maximum cross-correlation with each vox el in the brain for (A) PETCO2 and (B) RVTRRF. Maps are thresholded at the percentage variance explained corresponding to Z>5.3. (C) The percentage of variance explained by the model containing both PETCO2 and RVTRRF, thresholded at the same values as (A) and (B).

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
8.
Figure 9

Figure 9. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Group average (n=6) latency map, for cross-correlation with PETCO 2. Latency maps of individual subjects were mean-centered and spatially normalized to an EPI template prior to averaging. Map is shown thresholded to include only voxels for which 3 or more subjects had a cross-correlation magnitude of Z>5.3.

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
9.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

(A) (−)PETO2, PETCO2, RVT, and RVTRRF for one subject, and (B) RVTRRF and PETCO2 for the same subject. In (B), PETCO2 has been shifted to the right by 10 s, which is the time lag yielding the maximum cross-correlation between the 2 signals. For display, all signals have been normalized to have unit standard deviation and zero mean, and PETO2 has been negated.

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.
10.
Figure 8

Figure 8. From: Relationship between respiration, end-tidal CO2, and BOLD signals in resting-state fMRI.

Latency maps. For each voxel, the time delay maximizing its cross-correlation with PETCO2 (left) and RVTRRF (right) is displayed. Maps are thresholded at a cross-correlation magnitude of Z>5.3. The range of latency values displayed for each subject is the mean ± SD [sec] of a Gaussian function fit to the latency histogram (except for Subject 2, whose latency distribution was bimodal).

Catie Chang, et al. Neuroimage. ;47(4):1381-1393.

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