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Results: 4

1.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Task-free presurgical mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging intrinsic activity.

Functional mapping based on fcMR imaging is robust across different image resolutions. These studies are comparisons of hand and tongue motor regions defined by actual motor task movements (left column) and task-free fcMR imaging (center column), similar to those in Fig. 2. The resting-state images were acquired using 3-mm isotropic voxels and 2-second TR, as in the task scans.

Hesheng Liu, et al. J Neurosurg. ;111(4):746-754.
2.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Task-free presurgical mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging intrinsic activity.

Comparison of results of direct cortical stimulation and fcMR imaging. The intraoperative photograph in the upper panel shows the grid placement for the patient in Case 2 and the locations of the electrodes that disrupted hand (14, 22) and tongue (40, 47, 48) movements. The fcMR analysis results are displayed in the lower panels; the hand motor region (left column) and the tongue motor region (right column) are displayed. Activation maps show the results of fcMR imaging analysis from Fig. 2. Filled green circles show the locations of cortical stimulation electrodes that selectively disrupted hand and tongue movements. The hand and tongue regions defined by fcMR imaging correlate with the estimates of the regions based on stimulation.

Hesheng Liu, et al. J Neurosurg. ;111(4):746-754.
3.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Task-free presurgical mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging intrinsic activity.

Functional mapping based on fcMR imaging is anatomically specific. These studies are comparisons of hand and tongue motor regions defined by actual motor task movements (left columns) and task-free fcMR imaging (center columns). The overlap of the two techniques is shown in red (right columns). The upper panels show data from the patient in Case 2, and the lower panels from the patient in Case 4. The right hemisphere is displayed on the right side of the panel. Note the systematic shift of the location of the hand and tongue regions in each patient, which is present for the fcMR analysis. The fcMR analysis of the hand region in the patient in Case 2 is less stable than other measures, possibly due to the location of the seizure activity (see text).

Hesheng Liu, et al. J Neurosurg. ;111(4):746-754.
4.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Task-free presurgical mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging intrinsic activity.

Task and fcMR imaging–based mapping localizing similar regions. Hand motor regions defined by actual motor task movements (left column) and task-free fcMR imaging (center column) are plotted on sagittal sections for each patient (overlaid on their structural image). Colors represent Z values, with the threshold set to Z = 0.4–0.5. The overlap of the two techniques is shown in red (right column). Each row displays a different patient, with the sex (M or F) and age (in years) indicated in the rightmost panel. Brain lesions are indicated by the white triangles for the patients in Cases 1, 2, and 4; the patient in Case 3 has no visible lesion.

Hesheng Liu, et al. J Neurosurg. ;111(4):746-754.

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