Results: 2

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Metabolomic Characterization of Human Rectal Adenocarcinoma With Intact Tissue Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

A) HRMAS 1HMRS spectrum of Patient 3, sample ii (benign mucosa); entire metabolite spectrum (top) and enlargement of the 3.2–3.7 ppm area, which significantly contributed to the variation in PC 2; B) Sample 3-i contained 0 percent malignant cells, 70 percent benign epithelium, 20 percent stromal tissue, and 10 percent inflammation; C) Spectrum from Patient 3, sample iv (tumor tissue), entire spectrum (top) and enlargement of the 3.2–3.7 ppm area; D). Sample 3 iv contained 20 percent malignant cells, 0 percent benign epithelium, 60 percent stromal tissue, and 20 percent inflammation.

Kate W. Jordan, et al. Dis Colon Rectum. ;52(3):520-525.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Metabolomic Characterization of Human Rectal Adenocarcinoma With Intact Tissue Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

Illustration of principal component analysis (PCA). This process starts with the top S-P matrix, where S and P represent samples and spectral peaks, respectively, and p#,# is the value of the standardized peak concentration. Standardized concentration refers to the difference between the particular intensity of the concerned metabolite for a particular sample and the mean intensity normalized by the standard deviation, with both mean and standard deviation values calculated for the metabolite from the entire sample set. From this S-P matrix, the PCA process generates a principal component (PC) coefficient matrix (bottom) to be used to form PCs of linear combinations of the standardized peak concentrations. All PCs are orthogonal to each other, with PC1 representing the greatest and PC23, the least changes in the standardized peak concentrations.

Kate W. Jordan, et al. Dis Colon Rectum. ;52(3):520-525.

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