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Results: 3

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Platelet proteome changes associated with diabetes and during platelet storage for transfusion.

Cellular locations of proteins observed with differential abundance due to diabetes (A) and after 5-days of storage (B).

David L. Springer, et al. J Proteome Res. ;8(5):2261-2272.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Normal and platelets from diabetics stored for transfusion have platelet spreading defects. From: Platelet proteome changes associated with diabetes and during platelet storage for transfusion.

Platelets from normal and diabetic donors were stored for transfusion and allowed to spread on fibrinogen-coated coverslips (100 μg/mL) blocked with 0.5% BSA. The coverslips were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde and processed for imaging by DIC (100x). Black arrows illustrate a fully spread platelet. White squares indicate platelet aggregates. Center images show magnification of spread platelets (black square) and a platelet aggregate (white square). The results are representative of two normal and two diabetic donors.

David L. Springer, et al. J Proteome Res. ;8(5):2261-2272.
3.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Stored diabetic platelets have increased levels of the collagen binding integrin, α2β1. From: Platelet proteome changes associated with diabetes and during platelet storage for transfusion.

Platelet samples were collected at days 0, 1, 3, and 5 and analyzed by flow cytometry to determine the levels of the α2β1 integrin. An increase in α2β1 integrin levels was apparent between days 3 and 5 of storage relative to that for similarly stored platelets from healthy non-diabetics. The data shown are representative of two normal and two diabetic donors.

David L. Springer, et al. J Proteome Res. ;8(5):2261-2272.

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