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1.
Figure 9

Figure 9. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

A schematic showing the principle of deflection-based microcantilever biosensing. (Figure from reference [158].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
2.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

Photograph of a five-ringed silicon-on-insulator microring resonator array used to detect biological binding events. In this example, the microrings are accessed by on-chip waveguides that are tapered off-chip to conventional fiber optics. (Figure from reference[55].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
3.
Figure 7

Figure 7. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

A diagram (A) and scanning electron micrograph (B) of three groups of ten, 20-nm wide silicon nanowires used for label-free DNA detection. Using the superlattice nanowire patterning scheme, large numbers of precisely aligned nanowires can be fabricated for use as biosensors. (Figure from reference [99].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
4.
Figure 8

Figure 8. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

Two-dimensional microcantilever array chip used to monitor protein-protein interactions. (A) Schematic of a reaction well. There were multiple cantilevers in each reaction well. Laser light reflected off a cantilever’s end pad was used to monitor the deflection of cantilevers. (B) A chip soaked in DI water. (C) A scanning electron micrograph of 3 cantilevers in a reaction well. (Figure adapted from reference [159].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
5.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

(A) SPRI image of a 120-element dsDNA array. (B) Difference image and line scan (C) after incubation of array from (A) with the transcription factor Gal4. Specific protein binding is observed as a positive change in the reflected light image. (Figure adapted from reference [16].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
6.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

Schematic representation of an imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPRI) instrumental configuration. Biomolecular binding events are transduced as a change in reflected light intensity, and multiplexing is accomplished by imaging a large portion of the substrate using the CCD. (Figure adapted from reference [5].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
7.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

Photonic crystal biosensors transduce biomolecular binding events by measuring the shift in wavelength of light reflected by the substrate. Shown here is a 384-well plate configuration of a photonic crystal sensing platform, which can be interrogated using a light emitting diode and simple spectrometer. This example demonstrates the screening small molecule libraries for inhibiting a specific DNA-protein binding event. (Figure adapted from reference [46].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
8.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

(A) Schematic illustration of sample introduction onto a nanohole array biosensor. (B) Diagram showing nanohole array instrumental set up. (C) CCD image of 30 sets of nanohole arrays having different geometries. (D, E) Scanning electron micrographs showing two a top and side view of a 9 × 9 nanohole array. (Figure adapted from reference [34].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.
9.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: Label-Free Technologies for Quantitative Multiparameter Biological Analysis.

(A) Schematic of a Si nanowire-based FET device configured as a sensor with antibody receptors (green), where binding of a protein with net positive charge (red) yields a decrease in the conductance. (B) Cross-sectional diagram and scanning electron microscopy image of a single Si nanowire sensor device, grown via the VLS method and a photograph of a prototype nanowire sensor biochip with integrated microfluidic sample delivery. (Figure adapted from reference [85].)

Abraham J. Qavi, et al. Anal Bioanal Chem. ;394(1):121-135.

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