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Results: 5

1.
Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. From: Caloric restriction improves memory in elderly humans.

Inverse correlation (Spearman, r = −0.81, P = 0.014) between changes in insulin levels and memory score improvements after caloric restriction in those subjects with best adherence to the diet (n = 9). Line indicates regression fit.

A. V. Witte, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 January 27;106(4):1255-1260.
2.
Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. From: Caloric restriction improves memory in elderly humans.

Inverse correlation (Spearman, r = −0.83, P = 0.005) between changes in high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and memory score improvements after caloric restriction in those subjects with best adherence to the diet (n = 9). Line indicates regression fit.

A. V. Witte, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 January 27;106(4):1255-1260.
3.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Caloric restriction improves memory in elderly humans.

Percentage memory scores normalized to baseline values before and after caloric restriction (dashed line), unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) enhancement (dotted line), and control (solid line). Note that after caloric restriction, a highly significant improvement in memory scores can be seen. Baseline memory scores were not significantly different. Dots give means, bars indicate standard error. ***, P < 0.001.

A. V. Witte, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 January 27;106(4):1255-1260.
4.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Caloric restriction improves memory in elderly humans.

Percentage changes in weight (black bars), BMI (gray bars), and changes in unsaturated fatty acids (UFA)-to-saturated fatty acids (SFA) ratio (striped bars) after caloric restriction (group 1), UFA enhancement (group 2), and control condition. Note that caloric restriction led to a significant decrease in weight, BMI, and UFA enhancement to a significant increase in the UFA-to-SFA-ratio. Error bars indicate standard error. ***, P < 0.001; **, P < 0.01 according to ANOVARM posthoc testings.

A. V. Witte, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 January 27;106(4):1255-1260.
5.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Caloric restriction improves memory in elderly humans.

Flow-chart of the study. 50 healthy elderly subjects were initially included in the study and performed baseline measurements of physiological parameters, fasting serum levels, and memory tests (session I). Based on age, sex, and BMI, subjects were stratified into 3 groups to follow either a specific diet, namely caloric restriction (n = 20, group 1) or unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) enhancement (n = 20, group 2), or not to change previous eating habits (control, n = 10). Dietary instructions were provided by clinical dieticians. One women from group 1 was not available for posttesting. After a period of 3 months, participants again underwent measurements of physiological parameters, fasting serum levels, and memory tests (session II). At baseline, after 6 and after 12 weeks, subjects additionally completed nutrition diaries over 7 consecutive days.

A. V. Witte, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 January 27;106(4):1255-1260.

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