We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 2

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Chronic discrimination predicts higher circulating levels of E-selectin in a national sample: the MIDUS study.

Relationship between exposure to everyday discrimination and serum e-selectin in men and women. Adjusted analyses revealed a significant gender × discrimination interaction [F(2,786) = 15.44, P<.001], and gender-specific analyses showed that in men, chronic exposure to everyday discrimination (at both waves of MIDUS data collection) predicted significantly higher levels of e-selectin compared to men who never experienced everyday discrimination [F(2,367) = 3.66, P<.05]. In women, everyday discrimination and e-selectin levels were unrelated.

Elliot M. Friedman, et al. Brain Behav Immun. ;23(5):684-692.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Chronic discrimination predicts higher circulating levels of E-selectin in a national sample: the MIDUS study.

Relationship between exposure to major lifetime discrimination and serum e-selectin in men and women. Adjusted analyses revealed a significant gender × discrimination interaction [F(2,786) = 6.24, P<.01], and gender-specific analyses showed that among men, exposure to 3 or more instances of any kind of major discrimination (see Table 1) predicted significantly greater e-selectin levels compared to those exposed to fewer or no instances of discrimination [F(2,367) = 4.15, P<.05]. In women, discrimination exposure and e-selectin levels were unrelated.

Elliot M. Friedman, et al. Brain Behav Immun. ;23(5):684-692.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk