Results: 4

2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. Relationship Between Hepatic Triglyceride Content and Total/Regional Adiposity by Gender. From: Ethnic Differences in Hepatic Steatosis: An insulin resistance paradox?.

Hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC) was log transformed to meet assumptions of ANCOVA analysis. As expected, HTGC increased as a function of total and regional adiposity in both sexes. (A) The plot of HTGC vs. percent body fat (%BF) in men and women. The slopes of this relationship were significantly different (Slope Men 0.06 vs. Slope women 0.05 P=0.019). (B) The plot of HTGC vs. percent intraperitoneal fat (%IP) (intraperitoneal fat mass / total body mass) in men and women. The slopes of this relationship were significantly different (Slope Men 0.66 vs. Slope women 0.81 P=0.022). Adjustment for subcutaneous fat yielded results similar to adjustment for %BF.

Richard Guerrero, et al. Hepatology. ;49(3):791-801.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Relationship Between Insulin Resistance, Intraperitoneal Adiposity, Hepatic Triglyceride Content and Plasma Triglyceride Levels. From: Ethnic Differences in Hepatic Steatosis: An insulin resistance paradox?.

(A) The plot of HOMAIR vs. %IP in men and women. Among the men, all regression lines had equal slopes. The mean value of HOMAIR was higher in African-American men after adjustment for %IP (P<0.023), while Hispanic and Caucasian men had similar mean HOMAIR values after this adjustment (P=0.138). Among the women, all regression lines had equal slopes. After adjustment for %IP, African-American women had the highest values of HOMAIR followed by Hispanic then Caucasian women (P<0.001). (B) The plot of serum triglyceride (TG) vs. hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC) in men and women. The slope of the relationship between HTGC and TG in African-American men was significantly lower than the other men (P<0.001). No difference in slope or mean value of TG was apparent between Hispanic and Caucasian men after adjustment for HTGC. Among the women, all regression lines had equal slopes. African-American women had lower mean TG levels after adjustment for HTGC (P<0.001). Mean TG levels remained similar between Hispanic and Caucasian women after adjustment for HTGC (P=0.878).

Richard Guerrero, et al. Hepatology. ;49(3):791-801.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Relationship Between Hepatic Triglyceride Content and Total/Regional Adiposity. From: Ethnic Differences in Hepatic Steatosis: An insulin resistance paradox?.

Hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC) was log transformed to meet assumptions of ANCOVA analysis. As expected, HTGC increased as a function of total and regional adiposity in all groups, but this relationship varied by ethnicity. (A) The plot of HTGC vs. percent body fat (%BF) in men and women. In Hispanic and Caucasian men, the difference in slopes of this relationship was not significant (P=0.539); however, the slope of this relationship trended toward lower values in African-American men compared to the other ethnicities (vs. Hispanic, P=0.067; vs. Caucasian, P=0.054). Hispanics had the highest mean value of HTGC followed by Caucasian then African-American men after adjustment for %BF (P<0.033). Among the women, all ethnicities demonstrated different slopes for this relationship (P<0.025). The greatest slope was observed in Hispanic women followed by Caucasian then African-American women. (B) The plot of HTGC vs. percent intraperitoneal fat (%IP) (intraperitoneal fat mass / total body mass) in men and women. All regression lines had equal slopes and the ethnic-specific adjusted mean values of HTGC were similar among the men (Hispanics 4.2±1.0 vs. Caucasians 3.8±1.0 vs. African-Americans 3.5±1.0 %, P>0.05 for all comparisons). Among the women, all regression lines had equal slopes. The adjusted mean value of HTGC was similar between Hispanic and African-American women once adjusted for %IP (3.9±1.1 vs. 3.5±1.0 %, respectively; P=0.260). However, the mean value of HTGC in Caucasian women was slightly lower than the other ethnicities after adjustment for %IP (3.0±1.1 %, P<0.01). Adjusting HTGC for subcutaneous and lower extremity fat failed to account for the difference in HTGC between these ethnic groups. Indeed, adjustment for subcutaneous fat yielded results similar to adjustment for %BF. Likewise, the slope of the relationship between HTGC and lower extremity fat either approached zero (men) or was not significantly different from zero (women).

Richard Guerrero, et al. Hepatology. ;49(3):791-801.

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