Results: 2

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Wound Healing.

Demonstration of VEGF’s potential role in a healing wound. By stimulating the endothelial cell, multiple phases of the angiogenic cascade are enhanced. This figure highlights the multiple synergistic stimulants to angiogenesis that may be generated if VEGF is administered to a wound.

Philip Bao, et al. J Surg Res. ;153(2):347-358.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. VEGF and Cellular Basis of Healing. From: The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Wound Healing.

Note the multiple roles that endogenous cells play in producing VEGF in the local wound environment. Platlets arrive first on Day “0” of wounding, followed by a peak of macrophages at Day 2. Endothelial cells begin to migrate at Day 2 and new capillary endothelium can be seen between Day’s 3–4. By Day 5, new collagen is produced from fibroblasts. The initial cell that releases VEGF are platelets which enter the wound after debridement. In addition, macrophages release VEGF which stimulate endothelial cells to proliferate and migrate. VEGF has been shown to stimulate keratinocyte migration and collagen production via fibroblasts. VEGF secretion also induces release of other growth factors which further stimulate healing.

Philip Bao, et al. J Surg Res. ;153(2):347-358.

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