Display Settings:

Items per page
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 6

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Open field locomotion in Fmr1 mouse lines from Cohort 2. From: Social Approach in Genetically-Engineered Mouse Lines Relevant to Autism.

Significant increases in distance traveled were seen in the Fmr1-null mice on an FVB/129, but not a C57BL/6J, background. Activity was assessed by a 1-hour trial in an open field chamber. Data shown are mean ± SEM. *p<0.05.

Sheryl S. Moy, et al. Genes Brain Behav. ;8(2):129-142.
2.
Figure 6

Figure 6. Time spent in each side by Igf-1 mice during the tests for (a) sociability and (b) preference for social novelty. From: Social Approach in Genetically-Engineered Mouse Lines Relevant to Autism.

All groups had a significant preference for proximity to stranger 1 in the test for sociability. Data shown are mean + SEM for each group. * p<0.05, within-group comparison, stranger 1 side different from empty cage side. # p<0.05, comparison with same measure in +/+ female mice.

Sheryl S. Moy, et al. Genes Brain Behav. ;8(2):129-142.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. Time spent sniffing each cage by Slc6a4 mice during the tests for (a) sociability and (b) preference for social novelty. From: Social Approach in Genetically-Engineered Mouse Lines Relevant to Autism.

During the test for sociability, all groups had a significant preference for the cage containing stranger 1. Data shown are mean + SEM for each group. * p<0.05, within-group comparison, stranger 1 side different from empty cage side (a) or stranger 2 side (b).

Sheryl S. Moy, et al. Genes Brain Behav. ;8(2):129-142.
4.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Time spent in each side by Slc6a4 mice during the tests for (a) sociability and (b) preference for social novelty. From: Social Approach in Genetically-Engineered Mouse Lines Relevant to Autism.

Neither male nor female Slc6a4-null mice, or female heterozygous mice, had a significant preference for proximity to stranger 1. Data shown are mean + SEM for each group. * p<0.05, within-group comparison, stranger 1 side different from empty cage side (a) or stranger 2 side (b). # p<0.05, comparison with same measure in both +/+ and +/− male mice.

Sheryl S. Moy, et al. Genes Brain Behav. ;8(2):129-142.
5.
Figure 3

Figure 3. (a) Time spent sniffing each cage during the test for sociability and (b) time spent in each side during the test for social novelty preference in Fmr1 mouse lines from Cohort 2. From: Social Approach in Genetically-Engineered Mouse Lines Relevant to Autism.

All groups had a significant preference for the wire cage containing an unfamiliar mouse, stranger 1, in comparison to an empty cage (a), and a significant preference for proximity to the more-novel stranger 2 (b). Data shown are mean + SEM. * p<0.05, within-group comparison, stranger 1 side different from opposite side.

Sheryl S. Moy, et al. Genes Brain Behav. ;8(2):129-142.
6.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Time spent in each side during the test for sociability in (a) Cohort 1 and (b) Cohort 2 of the Fmr1 mouse lines, and (c) numbers of entries during the test. From: Social Approach in Genetically-Engineered Mouse Lines Relevant to Autism.

Fmr1-null mice on the FVB/129 background, from both cohorts, did not have a significant preference for proximity to stranger 1. The loss of Fmr1 did not have significant effects on number of entries in either background strain. Side choice for Cohort 1 included an empty side (without any wire cage); for Cohort 2, an empty cage side. Data shown are mean + SEM. * p<0.05, within-group comparison, stranger 1 side different from empty (Cohort 1) or empty cage (Cohort 2) side. # p<0.05, comparison with same measure in +/y mice with C57BL/6J background.

Sheryl S. Moy, et al. Genes Brain Behav. ;8(2):129-142.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk