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1.
Figure 5

Figure 5. Lateral renderings of mixed load, accuracy-equated analyses. From: Development of Spatial and Verbal Working Memory Capacity in the Human Brain.

(A) Regions of greater activation for adults at highest SWM load compared to children at lowest SWM load (n = 32). (B) Regions of greater activation for adults at highest VWM load compared to children at lowest VWM load (n = 28). Comparisons are significant at p < .001, uncorrected.

Moriah E. Thomason, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. ;21(2):316-332.
2.
Figure 6

Figure 6. Lateral renderings of the main effect of material-type. From: Development of Spatial and Verbal Working Memory Capacity in the Human Brain.

SWM > VWM (top two panels) and VWM > SWM (bottom two panels) confirm lateralization effects are present for both groups. Comparisons are significant at p < .001, uncorrected. Positive laterality index values denote rightward lateralization. SWM = spatial WM; VWM = verbal WM.

Moriah E. Thomason, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. ;21(2):316-332.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Development of Spatial and Verbal Working Memory Capacity in the Human Brain.

Activations as a function of load for adults (left) and children (right) for spatial (upper panel) and verbal (lower panel) WM maintenance. Activations (p < .001, uncorrected) are displayed on a standard MR on axial slices at z = 0, +32, +48. Left side of each image is the left side of the brain.

Moriah E. Thomason, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. ;21(2):316-332.
4.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Examples of spatial and verbal trials. From: Development of Spatial and Verbal Working Memory Capacity in the Human Brain.

(A) Sequence of events in a spatial trial with a three-location load, with experimental task (WM maintenance) above and control task (no WM maintenance) below; participant response period is shown with dashed lines. (B) Examples of encoding displays in one- and five-dot spatial load conditions. (C) Sequence of events in a verbal trial with a four-letter load with experimental task (WM maintenance) above and control task (no WM maintenance) below; participant response period is shown with dashed lines. (D) Examples of encoding displays in two- and six-letter verbal load conditions.

Moriah E. Thomason, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. ;21(2):316-332.
5.
Figure 4

Figure 4. Group × Load spatial and verbal interactions. From: Development of Spatial and Verbal Working Memory Capacity in the Human Brain.

Activations (p < .001, uncorrected) are displayed on a standard magnetic resonance (MR) on axial slices. Peak contrast values (experiment > control) were extracted for every participant, averaged within each group, across memory loads, and are plotted as line graphs adjacent to activation pictures. Coordinates are in MNI space. SEM denoted by brackets.

Moriah E. Thomason, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. ;21(2):316-332.
6.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Performance by children (solid lines, squares) and adults (broken lines, circles) as a function of WM load. From: Development of Spatial and Verbal Working Memory Capacity in the Human Brain.

(A) Percent correct for spatial trials, showing children as less accurate, and a Group × Load interaction. Control blocks, which did not differ by load, are shown as averaged single points for all loads at right in all panels. (B) Percent correct for verbal trials, showing children as less accurate and a Group × Load interaction. (C) Mean of median RTs for correct spatial trials, showing slower times for greater loads, and children as slower, but no interaction. (D) Mean of median RTs for correct verbal trials, showing slower times for greater loads, and children as slower, but no interaction. SEM denoted by brackets.

Moriah E. Thomason, et al. J Cogn Neurosci. ;21(2):316-332.

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