Results: 2

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. Energy intake and growth. From: Diet-induced obesity alters protein synthesis: Tissue-specific effects in fasted vs. fed mice.

Male C57BL/6J mice were allowed ad libitum access to either a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet (LF) or a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet (HF). Energy intake (Panel A) was determined by weighing the food that remained on each cage at the end of every week and dividing by 4, i.e. the number of mice per cage. The body weight (Panel B) of individual mice was determined at the end of each week. The data are expressed as mean ± sem, n = 16 per diet group per time point (* p < 0.05).

Stephanie R. Anderson, et al. Metabolism. ;57(3):347-354.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. Effect of diet-induced obesity on protein synthesis. From: Diet-induced obesity alters protein synthesis: Tissue-specific effects in fasted vs. fed mice.

Mice were maintained on either a low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet for 9 weeks. Protein synthesis was quantified following the injection of 2H2O via the incorporation of 2H-labeled alanine, mice were studied during either the fasted (saline gavage) or the fed (liquid meal) state. Muscle, liver and plasma albumin synthesis were quantified (Panel A, B and C, respectively). The data are expressed as the % newly made protein per hour, mean ± sem (n = 6 to 8, muscle and liver data and n = 3 to 4, albumin data), * p < 0.05 fed vs. fasted, # p < 0.05 fed vs. fed.

Stephanie R. Anderson, et al. Metabolism. ;57(3):347-354.

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