Display Settings:

Items per page
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 6

1.
<b>Figure 1.</b>

Figure 1.. From: Reference Ranges for Spirometry Across All Ages.

The median volumes for each outcome, smoothed by age. Note the relatively higher FEF25–75 compared with FVC and FEV1 in females compared with males.

Sanja Stanojevic, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 February 1;177(3):253-260.
2.
<b>Figure 4.</b>

Figure 4.. From: Reference Ranges for Spirometry Across All Ages.

Median curves for FEV1/FVC in males and females and their corresponding fifth percentile lower limit of normal. Females have greater FEV1/FVC ratios than males at all ages.

Sanja Stanojevic, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 February 1;177(3):253-260.
3.
<b>Figure 2.</b>

Figure 2.. From: Reference Ranges for Spirometry Across All Ages.

Height trends in FEV1 at eight specific ages demonstrate that, for any given height, age is as important to consider in determining the reference range, especially during puberty. In contrast to adulthood, where there is a decline with age, throughout childhood at any given height an older subject can be expected to have higher values of lung function. This effect is most marked during puberty.

Sanja Stanojevic, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 February 1;177(3):253-260.
4.
<b>Figure 3.</b>

Figure 3.. From: Reference Ranges for Spirometry Across All Ages.

Between-subject variability, expressed as the coefficient of variantion (CV) for each of the three spirometric outcomes. A CV of 10% corresponds to a normal range of 80 to 120% predicted. As can be seen, the CV for FVC and FEV1 is near 10% only over the age range of 15 to 35 years. The variability at other ages and for FEF25–75 at all ages is considerably greater.

Sanja Stanojevic, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 February 1;177(3):253-260.
5.
<b>Figure 6.</b>

Figure 6.. From: Reference Ranges for Spirometry Across All Ages.

(A) Median FEV1 in males determined by the current model compared with the original NHANES III equations with the lower limit of normal. (B) The pediatric age range is expanded and demonstrates where the current models improve fit and how the use of the original NHANES III would underpredict true values in those younger than 8 years.

Sanja Stanojevic, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 February 1;177(3):253-260.
6.
<b>Figure 5.</b>

Figure 5.. From: Reference Ranges for Spirometry Across All Ages.

Comparison of z scores (as determined by the current model developed in non-Hispanic white subjects) among non-Hispanic whites, African-American females (A-AF, n = 1,481), African-American males (A-AM, n = 1,481), Mexican-American females (M-AF, n = 1,523), and Mexican-American males (M-AM, n = 1,116) from the original NHANES III dataset. As expected, non-Hispanic white subjects had a mean ± SD z score of 0 (±1). African-American subjects had lower FEV1 and FVC, but similar FEV/FVC ratios and flows compared with non-Hispanic white subjects. With the exception of Mexican-American females who had somewhat lower FVC, Mexican-American subjects had similar values to non-Hispanic white subjects.

Sanja Stanojevic, et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 February 1;177(3):253-260.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk