Display Settings:

Items per page

Results: 6

1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction.

Spine testing apparatus

Ralph E. Gay, et al. Spine J. ;8(6):982-990.
2.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction.

Path of guide needle and transducer in the intervertebral disc

Ralph E. Gay, et al. Spine J. ;8(6):982-990.
3.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction.

Vertical stress profiles in a grade 2 (mildly degenerated) L3-4 motion segment (5 conditions)

Ralph E. Gay, et al. Spine J. ;8(6):982-990.
4.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction.

Mean (SD) regional vertical stress in low degeneration discs (grade 1 and 2) during extension-distraction and flexion-distraction (n = 8)

Ralph E. Gay, et al. Spine J. ;8(6):982-990.
5.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction.

Mean (SD) regional vertical stress in high degeneration discs (grade 3 and 4) during extension-distraction and flexion-distraction (n = 7)

Ralph E. Gay, et al. Spine J. ;8(6):982-990.
6.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction.

Mean (SD) regional vertical (compressive) stress during 5 load conditions (all specimens, n = 15)
(C=compression, D=distraction, E=extension, F=flexion)
Differences between compression (either 300 N or 500 N) and each distraction condition were statistically significant in all disc regions (Repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc contrast tests, p < 0.001 for all comparisons)

Ralph E. Gay, et al. Spine J. ;8(6):982-990.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk