We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 3

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Hippocampal activation in adults with mild cognitive impairment predicts subsequent cognitive decline.

Results of exploratory whole brain analysis, showing brain regions where functional activation predicts cognitive decline. Exploratory whole brain analysis is convergent with a priori analysis, indicating that the hippocampal formation is the only place where activation predicts cognitive decline (p<0.001).

S L Miller, et al. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. ;79(6):630-635.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Hippocampal activation in adults with mild cognitive impairment predicts subsequent cognitive decline.

Hippocampal region from which percentage signal change was extracted in hypothesis driven analysis. Recruitment of a portion of the hippocampal formation during performance of this task is thought to occur, at least in part, because of the learning of new information. This activated portion of the hippocampal formation (as identified using the novel versus repeated contrast) was used as a functional region of interest for the present study to investigate whether hippocampal activation predicts cognitive decline. Left side of the brain is shown on the left of the image.

S L Miller, et al. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. ;79(6):630-635.
3.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Hippocampal activation in adults with mild cognitive impairment predicts subsequent cognitive decline.

Greater hippocampal activation at the time of functional MRI (MRI) scanning predicts greater cognitive decline over the ensuing ∼6 years. Scatterplot shows, on the y axis, parameter estimates (representing per cent signal change) of differential hippocampal activation in novel versus repeated contrast, extracted from the hippocampal region of interest shown in fig 1. The x axis shows estimated rate of change in Clinical Dementia Rating Sum-of-Boxes (CDR SB) score per year over ∼6 years after fMRI scan in participants who remained classified as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in those who were diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) during the follow-up interval.

S L Miller, et al. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. ;79(6):630-635.

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk