Results: 3

1.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Excess Mortality Following Hip Fracture: The Role of Underlying Health Status.

Proportion of subjects at cohort entry with any limitations in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) and severity of impairment.

Anna N. A. Tosteson, et al. Osteoporos Int. ;18(11):1463-1472.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Excess Mortality Following Hip Fracture: The Role of Underlying Health Status.

Proportion of mortality in the population that is attributable to hip fracture by age and sex when adjustment is limited to age, sex and race (no health status adjustment) and when health status, and comorbid conditions are also included (health status adjustment). Error bars show upper 95% confidence interval.

Anna N. A. Tosteson, et al. Osteoporos Int. ;18(11):1463-1472.
3.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Excess Mortality Following Hip Fracture: The Role of Underlying Health Status.

Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for early (within 6 months) and late (beyond 6 months) mortality following hip fracture. Models 1, 2, and 3 include all subjects. Model 1 adjusts for age, sex, and race; Model 2 adjusts for age, sex, race, functional status, comorbid conditions and socioeconomic variables; Model 3 adjusts for age, sex, race, functional status, and comorbid conditions. Results for specified strata show hip fracture hazard ratios under Model 2.

Anna N. A. Tosteson, et al. Osteoporos Int. ;18(11):1463-1472.

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