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1.
Fig. 1

Fig. 1. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Relationship between CoQ9 (A) and CoQ10 (B) content of heart mitochondria from different species and maximum lifespan potential (MLSP) of the species, expressed as log10 units. (Adapted from data in Lass et al., 1997).

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
2.
Fig. 3

Fig. 3. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Relationship between rates of superoxide anion radical generation by cardiac submitochondrial particles from different species and amounts of CoQ9 (A) and CoQ10 (B) extracted from heart mitochondria. (From Lass et al., 1997).

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
3.
Fig. 2

Fig. 2. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Relationship between rate of superoxide anion radical generation by cardiac submitochondrial particles and maximum life span potential (MLSP) of different species, expressed as log10 units. (Adapted from data in Lass et al., 1997).

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
4.
Fig. 4

Fig. 4. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Rates of superoxide anion radical generation by CoQ-depleted/repleted rat (A) and bovine (B) heart submitochondrial particles (SMPs). Freeze-dried SMPs were depleted of native CoQ by six repeated extractions with pentane and reconstituted with specific amounts of CoQ homologues, followed by measurements of rates of O2˙̄ generation. (From Lass et al., 1997).

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
5.
Fig. 8

Fig. 8. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Survival plots for groups of 50 mice fed a control diet or low or high amounts of CoQ10. The low (0.72 mg/g of food) and high (2.81 mg/g) CoQ diets were introduced when the mice were 3.5 months of age and yielded daily CoQ intakes of approximately 93 or 371 mg/kg body weight throughout life. Survivorship, expressed as Kaplan-Meier probability, was not significantly different from the control for the mice with low or high intakes of CoQ (p>0.065, Tarone-Ware). Adapted from Sohal et al., 2006.

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
6.
Fig. 5

Fig. 5. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Relationship between amounts of CoQ associated with membrane proteins and rate of superoxide anion radical generation by cardiac mitochondria of different mammalian species. Mitochondrial membrane proteins were isolated as deoxycholic acid (DOC) pelletable micelles, and the CoQ9 and CoQ10 content was determined by HPLC. The CoQ content (CoQ9 + CoQ10), retained in the mitochondrial DOC micelles in different species, is expressed as percent of the total amount of CoQ present in whole mitochondria and is plotted against the rate of O2˙̄ generation, reported previously by Lass et al., 1997.

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
7.
Fig. 6

Fig. 6. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Effect of CoQ10 intake on CoQ9 (top panels) and CoQ10 (bottom) content in mitochondria from different tissues of young adult mice (left) or rats (right). In studies on mice (Kamzalov et al., 2003), CoQ10 was added to the food yielding daily CoQ intakes of 148 or 654 mg/kg body weight for 11 weeks. Rats were fed an amount equivalent to the low dose (150 mg/kg/d) for 13 weeks prior to tissue collection (Kwong et al., 2002). Values are means ± SE for 5–8 mice or 6–7 rats; * p<0.05 when compared with the control group (planned individual comparison within one-way ANOVA). The mouse data are from Kamzalov et al., 2003.

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.
8.
Fig. 7

Fig. 7. From: Coenzyme Q, oxidative stress and aging.

Effect of coenzyme Q10 intake on α-tocopherol concentration in mitochondria from different tissues of young adult mice or rats. In studies on mice (Kamzalov et al., 2003), CoQ10 was added to the food in different amounts yielding daily CoQ intakes of 148 (low) or 654 (high) mg/kg body weight for 11 weeks. Rats consumed an amount equivalent to the low dose (150 mg/kg/d) for 13 weeks prior to tissue collection (Kwong et al., 2002). Values are means ± SE for 5–8 mice or 6–7 rats; * p<0.05 when compared with the control group (planned individual comparison within one-way ANOVA). Data for mouse are from Kamzalov et al., 2003; α-tocopherol concentrations in rat mitochondria are from previously unpublished data from the study described by Kwong et al., 2002.

Rajindar S. Sohal, et al. Mitochondrion. ;7(Suppl):S103-S111.

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