Results: 4

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Management: Part I--Behaviour change, diet, and activity.

Some patients may find that alcohol accounts for a much larger energy intake than they expected. Alcohol can also encourage some people to eat more

Alison Avenell, et al. BMJ. 2006 October 7;333(7571):740-743.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Management: Part I--Behaviour change, diet, and activity.

A possible pathway for starting weight management to provide support appropriate to the stage. Adapted from Counterweight programme (see Further Reading box)

Alison Avenell, et al. BMJ. 2006 October 7;333(7571):740-743.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Management: Part I--Behaviour change, diet, and activity.

Concerns have been raised that diets focusing long term on eating mostly protein with small amounts of carbohydrate may increase the risk of osteoporosis and kidney stones (above)

Alison Avenell, et al. BMJ. 2006 October 7;333(7571):740-743.
4.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Management: Part I--Behaviour change, diet, and activity.

In the United Kingdom over 22% of the adult population is now obese, with multiple health problems related to a body mass index—weight (in kilograms) divided by height (in metres) squared—of 30 or higher. In England the national service frameworks for diabetes and coronary heart disease highlight the importance of helping patients who are obese. People continue to gain weight until their 50s and 60s, so 30-40% of older people will be obese, with chronic disease, mobility problems, and depression aggravated by obesity.

Alison Avenell, et al. BMJ. 2006 October 7;333(7571):740-743.

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