Results: 2

1.
Figure 1.

Figure 1. From: Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Arising from Barrett’s Dysplasia: A Case Report of Double Occurrence and Prolonged Survival after Chemotherapy.

Computed tomographic (CT) images of chest and abdomen in (column a) prechemotherapy and (column b) postchemotherapy period (5 months after initial diagnosis) demonstrating the excellent response to chemotherapy. Row 1, Axillary lymphadenopathy. Row 2, Lower esophageal thickening. Row 3, Liver metastases. Row 4, Periaortic lymphadenopathy. Subsequent CT scans did not reveal any evidence of visceral or lymph node malignancy.

Hemender S. Vats, et al. Clin Med Res. 2006 September;4(3):184-188.
2.
Figure 2.

Figure 2. From: Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Arising from Barrett’s Dysplasia: A Case Report of Double Occurrence and Prolonged Survival after Chemotherapy.

(a) Invasive poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma arising at the lower end of the esophagus. There is a solid proliferation of highly atypical epithelial cells with some gland formation. Note the surface ulcer with fibrinous exudate. (b) Postchemotherapy endoscopic biopsy (8 months after initial diagnosis). Cardiac-type mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, consistent with Barrett’s esophagus. There is no evidence of dysplasia. Note the accompanying squamous re-epitheliazation. (c) Endoscopic biopsy of lower esophagus 15 months after completion of chemotherapy demonstrated high-grade dysplasia. The glands show architectural complexity (manifesting as crowding) with nuclear stratification and hyperchromasia. (d) Thirty-months postchemotherapy. High-grade dysplasia persists. (e) Three and one-half years after chemotherapy intramucosal adenocarcinoma was found in the background of high-grade dysplasia. The lower aspect of the figure shows an elongated nest of neoplastic cells invading the lamina propria. (f) Intramucosal adenocarcinoma in esophagectomy specimen. The high-grade dysplasia is accompanied by neoplastic cells infiltrating the lamina propria and muscularis mucosa. Despite extensive sampling of the lesion for histologic evaluation, there was no involvement of the submucosa.

Hemender S. Vats, et al. Clin Med Res. 2006 September;4(3):184-188.

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