Results: 3

1.
Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. From: Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer.

Sooty shearwater diving depths and frequency (a), sea surface temperatures experienced (b), and primary productivity (c) at each dive location, in relation to latitude. Sea surface temperatures (SST) were recorded by the archival tags on each bird just before a dive. Primary productivity (PP) was measured remotely by satellite and overlaid onto the locations of each dive (see Materials and Methods). Note the paucity of dives, warm sea surface temperatures, and low primary productivity at low latitudes of the South and North Pacific when shearwaters cross the equatorial region.

Scott A. Shaffer, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 August 22;103(34):12799-12802.
2.
Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. From: Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer.

Shearwater migrations originating from breeding colonies in New Zealand. (a) Interpolated geolocation tracks of 19 sooty shearwaters during breeding (light blue) and subsequent migration pathways (yellow, start of migration and northward transit; orange, wintering grounds and southward transit). The 30° parallels, equator, and international dateline are indicted by dashed lines. (bd) Representative figure-eight movement patterns of individual shearwaters traveling to one of three “winter” destinations in the North Pacific. These tracks also represent those of three breeding pairs to reveal the dispersion and extent of each pair. The image was created by using the Blue Marble data set (15).

Scott A. Shaffer, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 August 22;103(34):12799-12802.
3.
Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. From: Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer.

Sooty shearwater latitudinal movements (white open circles, n = 4,375 filtered locations) and primary productivity in the South (yellow) and North (red) Pacific throughout the year. Primary productivity is represented by the mean (±SD) of 8-day productivity from 1997 to 2005 encompassing the geographic regions where sooty shearwaters most frequently occurred (see Materials and Methods). The shaded regions represent the time periods for breeding (BR), migration, and prenuptial (PN) phases. Note that chick-hatching (A) occurs during the austral summer when productivity becomes higher in the South Pacific than in the North Pacific. Upon completion of breeding, the onset of migration coincides with the period when primary productivity becomes higher in the North Pacific (B). Primary productivity in the North Pacific peaks several months before shearwaters return to the South Pacific. Shearwaters conduct the reverse migration in October when productivity is still higher in the North Pacific. However, the timely return is required so adults can court during the prenuptial phase and lay an egg that will hatch (A) when productivity is the highest available at that time (i.e., between A and B).

Scott A. Shaffer, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 August 22;103(34):12799-12802.

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