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Results: 5

1.
FIG. 3.

FIG. 3. From: Rippling Is a Predatory Behavior in Myxococcus xanthus.

Rippling differences observed in wild-type strains DK1622 and DZ2. M. xanthus cells from strains DK1622 and DZ2 were pipetted in the presence and absence of E. coli prey on CF agar and incubated at 32°C for 72 h. (A) DK1622 alone; (B) DZ2 alone; (C) DK1622 with E. coli; (D) DZ2 with E. coli. Although rippling is observed in both M. xanthus strains in the presence of prey E. coli cells, rippling was only observed in the pure cultures of strain DK1622.

James E. Berleman, et al. J Bacteriol. 2006 August;188(16):5888-5895.
2.
FIG. 4.

FIG. 4. From: Rippling Is a Predatory Behavior in Myxococcus xanthus.

Lytic differences observed in wild-type strains DK1622 and DZ2. Log-phase cultures of strains DK1622 (⧫) and DZ2 (•) were harvested and washed in MMC buffer. One-milliliter cell suspensions containing ∼108 cells/ml were added to 12-well plates and incubated at 32°C. Cells were counted directly in a hemacytometer at the times indicated. Due to different levels of cell lysis, ∼108 cells were added to wells, and the viability was measured through direct cell counts at the times indicated.

James E. Berleman, et al. J Bacteriol. 2006 August;188(16):5888-5895.
3.
FIG. 5.

FIG. 5. From: Rippling Is a Predatory Behavior in Myxococcus xanthus.

Effect of dead cells on developmental rippling. Ten-microliter aliquots of M. xanthus cells were pipetted onto CF media as mixtures of live and dead (heat-killed) cells and photographed after 24 h of incubation at 32°C. (A) 10% dead cells; (B) 80% dead cells. Ten-microliter aliquots of live cells were also pipetted separate from but adjacent to the same quantity of dead cell material. (C) 10% dead cells; (D) 80% dead cells. The volume of the dead cell material in each of these aliquots was raised to 10 μl with water.

James E. Berleman, et al. J Bacteriol. 2006 August;188(16):5888-5895.
4.
FIG. 2.

FIG. 2. From: Rippling Is a Predatory Behavior in Myxococcus xanthus.

Rippling behavior is essential for efficient predation. Replicate 10-μl aliquots containing ∼109 E. coli prey cells were pipetted onto dried 10 μl spots of ∼107 M. xanthus cells on either CF or CYE agar. At the times shown, E. coli cells were harvested and the number of E. coli survivors was measured as CFU. The lines represent E. coli only on CF (▪) and CYE (□), E. coli in the presence of DZ2 on CF (•) and CYE (○), and E. coli in the presence of DZ2 ΔpilA mutant on CF (▴) and CYE (▵).

James E. Berleman, et al. J Bacteriol. 2006 August;188(16):5888-5895.
5.
FIG. 1.

FIG. 1. From: Rippling Is a Predatory Behavior in Myxococcus xanthus.

Predatory behavior of M. xanthus. M. xanthus strain DZ2 cells mixed with India Ink (left) and E. coli cells (right) were pipetted as colonies 1 mm apart on CF medium. The M. xanthus swarm expands from the initial spot in a tangled motility pattern. Lysis of E. coli prey cells occurs as M. xanthus cells make direct contact with the E. coli colony. Expansion of the swarm through the E. coli colony induces rippling motility behavior. Beyond the E. coli colony, the swarm resumes the tangled motility behavior. Pictures were taken at the following time points: 16 h (A and B), 40 h (C and D), and 64 h (E and F). The panels on the left were captured at a magnification of ×20. The panels on the right were captured at a magnification of ×200 and correspond to the regions marked with rectangles on the left.

James E. Berleman, et al. J Bacteriol. 2006 August;188(16):5888-5895.

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