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Results: 4

1.
FIG. 2.

FIG. 2. From: Microbial Colonization and Competition on the Marine Alga Ulva australis.

Comparison of attachment and colonization by GFP-labeled P. tunicata grown in cellobiose (A) and glucose (B). Magnification, ×600. Scale bars = 50 μm.

Dhana Rao, et al. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 August;72(8):5547-5555.
2.
FIG. 1.

FIG. 1. From: Microbial Colonization and Competition on the Marine Alga Ulva australis.

Effect of axenic treatment on the U. australis epiphytic community. (A) Nonaxenic U. australis with the natural community present. (B) Axenic U. australis with very few bacteria remaining. Only plant cells are visible. Specimens were stained with 0.01% acridine orange. Scale bars = 50 μm.

Dhana Rao, et al. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 August;72(8):5547-5555.
3.
FIG. 4.

FIG. 4. From: Microbial Colonization and Competition on the Marine Alga Ulva australis.

Competitive biofilm development on the surface of U. australis in preestablished biofilms containing P. tunicata. In competitive biofilm development P. tunicata (green) was able to dominate in certain situations, but more commonly it was able to coexist with P. gracilis (red) (A). P. tunicata (green) was, however, outcompeted by R. gallaeciensis (red) (B). The P. tunicata AlpP mutant (green) was less competitive than the wild-type P. tunicata strain, as shown by competitive biofilm development with P. gracilis (red) (C). Scale bars = 50 μm.

Dhana Rao, et al. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 August;72(8):5547-5555.
4.
FIG. 3.

FIG. 3. From: Microbial Colonization and Competition on the Marine Alga Ulva australis.

Comparison of biofilm formation by mixed-species biofilms containing P. tunicata cells suspended sterile seawater, in natural seawater, or a mixture of 17 epiphytic strains. P. tunicata inoculated into filtered seawater did not persist for more than 7 days (A). P. tunicata inoculated into natural seawater was able to attach to U. australis and form biofilms that persisted for up to 3 weeks (B). P. tunicata inoculated with a mixture of 17 strains isolated from U. australis formed a complex biofilm, which was also able to persist for up to 3 weeks (C). GFP-labeled P. tunicata cells were enumerated under an epifluorescence microscopy (Table 1) before being stained with 0.01% acridine orange as shown here. Scale bars = 50 μm.

Dhana Rao, et al. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 August;72(8):5547-5555.

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