Display Settings:

Items per page
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 6

1.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: The proteasomal ATPase complex is required for stress-induced transcription in yeast.

The proteasomal ATPases are recruited to oxidative stress promoters upon induction. (A) ChIP assay using anti-Flag antibody in the three Flag-tagged strains indicated in the figure. (B) The same experiments were conducted with different oxidative stress promoters using wild-type cells and Sug1 antibody.

Rita Sulahian, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(5):1351-1357.
2.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: The proteasomal ATPase complex is required for stress-induced transcription in yeast.

Sug1 and Sug2, but not the 20S proteasome core complex, are essential for expression of the oxidative stress response gene GAD1 and PDR5. The strains indicated in the figure were incubated for 2 h at the non-permissive temperature before addition of 1 mM menadione for 1 h.

Rita Sulahian, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(5):1351-1357.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: The proteasomal ATPase complex is required for stress-induced transcription in yeast.

Analysis of the physical association of Cim5, Pre1 and Rpb3 with different regions of HSP104. ChIP assays were conducted in strains expressing Flag-tagged Cim5, Rpb3 or Pre1 using anti-Flag antibody at 25°C and following heat shock (37°C) for 5 and 20 min. The regions amplified are shown graphically at the top of the figure. The graphs show the quantification of the gel data.

Rita Sulahian, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(5):1351-1357.
4.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: The proteasomal ATPase complex is required for stress-induced transcription in yeast.

(A) The recruitment of polII, Sug1 and mediator to the HSP82 promoter are separable events. Strains expressing either Flag-tagged Rpb3 or HA-Gal11 expressing strain were heat shocked for 5 min at 39°C (HS) or kept at 25°C for the same period of time (C, control). Association of the proteins indicated with the HSE-containing region of the HSP82 promoter was assessed by ChIP analysis using the appropriate antibodies. (B) HSP82 expression at 25 and 37°C.

Rita Sulahian, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(5):1351-1357.
5.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: The proteasomal ATPase complex is required for stress-induced transcription in yeast.

Sug1 and Sug2, but not the 20S proteasome core complex, are essential for efficient heat shock gene expression. Using the strains indicated at the bottom of the figure, mRNA was extracted from cells (OD600 = 0.6) at 25°C (time = 0 in each panel) or 37°C at 45, 60 and 120 min after shifting the temperature to 37°C (the restrictive temperature). Actin levels were monitored as a control.

Rita Sulahian, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(5):1351-1357.
6.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: The proteasomal ATPase complex is required for stress-induced transcription in yeast.

The proteasomal ATPases are recruited to heat shock promoters upon induction. (A) ChIP analysis using the anti-Flag antibody and yeast strains expressing the FLAG-tagged proteins indicated in the figure was employed to monitor the association of the tagged proteins with the HSP104 promoter region including the heat shock elements at 25°C and after 5 min of heat shock (37°C). (B) The same experiments were conducted with HSP104 and the HSP26 promoter using wild-type cells and antibodies against the native proteins indicated. (C) Comparison of ChIP analyses of Sug1 recruitment to the HSP 26 promoter at 25 and 37°C in a wild-type and a sug1-20 strain. The loss of the signal in the sug1-20 strain at the restrictive temperature argues that the signal seen in the wt strain is indeed due to Sug1-promoter association and not cross-reactivity of the antibody with some other protein.

Rita Sulahian, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(5):1351-1357.

Display Settings:

Items per page

Supplemental Content

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Write to the Help Desk