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Results: 5

1.
<b>Figure 2</b>

Figure 2. From: Transcriptional activators in yeast.

Function, localization and abundance of yeast activators. (A) Percentage of proteins annotated to have ‘TR activity’ (GO term, see also Supplementary Table 1). (B) Percentage of protein localized to the nucleus as analyzed by Huh et al. (33). (C) Abundance of proteins as analyzed by Ghaemmaghami et al. (34).

Björn Titz, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(3):955-967.
2.
<b>Figure 3</b>

Figure 3. From: Transcriptional activators in yeast.

General physicochemical properties of activators. Mean and SEM of physicochemical properties is shown for several protein sets. (A) Isoelectric point (pI), (B) molecular mass (Mr), (C) GRAVY score (overall hydrophobicity), (D) aromaticity and (E) Codon adaptation index (CAI). For details see text.

Björn Titz, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(3):955-967.
3.
<b>Figure 1</b>

Figure 1. From: Transcriptional activators in yeast.

Activation strength in Y2H activators. (A) Number of activators showing the indicated activation strength in the LTH assay. They were divided into weak (LTHw), medium (LTHm) and strong (LTHs) activators as indicated. (B) Correlation of activation strength in LTH and bGal assays. The actually measured values are shown as dots, the median and two quartiles by an overlayed boxplot. Dotted lines indicate the median of bGal activity and LTH activity, respectively. For an explanation of datasets see Table 1.

Björn Titz, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(3):955-967.
4.
<b>Figure 4</b>

Figure 4. From: Transcriptional activators in yeast.

Amino acid clusters of activators. (AE) Amino acid clusters indicating the maximum number of the respective amino acid in a window of 20 amino acids of the protein (For the remaining amino acid clusters see Supplementary Figure 2). (F) Minimum isoelectric point (pI) in a 20 amino acids window, summarizing the effect of charged amino acids (glutamate, aspartate, arginine, lysine).

Björn Titz, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(3):955-967.
5.
<b>Figure 5</b>

Figure 5. From: Transcriptional activators in yeast.

Protein–protein interactions of transcription activators. (A) This protein interaction network shows the activators (red) and the proteins interacting with at least two activators. Proteins involved in transcription are indicated by a diamond shape and the activation strength (bGal and LTH combined) is reflected by the node size. Individual protein names can be identified in the online version of this figure. (B) Protein–protein interactions of activators and control groups with other proteins involved in transcription (P-GO term ‘transcription’). Physical, binary protein interaction data from the MIPS database (35) were used. The right three columns include indirect interactions involving a bridging protein (indicated by ‘+1’) between the activator and the transcription protein. (C) Percentage of proteins interacting with components of protein complexes involved in transcription. Only high-throughput derived protein complex data from the MIPS database were considered.

Björn Titz, et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006;34(3):955-967.

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