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Results: 4

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Hemoglobin degradation in malaria-infected erythrocytes determined from live cell magnetophoresis.

P. falciparum parasite life cycle in the erythrocyte and the associated increase in the intra-erythrocytic hemozoin content. Note the hemozoin particle appearance as brown inclusions in the erythrocyte microscopic images. The hemozoin content values were taken from published literature, as discussed in the text.

Lee R. Moore, et al. FASEB J. ;20(6):747-749.
2.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Hemoglobin degradation in malaria-infected erythrocytes determined from live cell magnetophoresis.

A) Magnetic erythrocyte fraction plotted as a function of the predominant P. falciparum form in the erythrocyte culture for all samples listed in Table 1. The apparent increase in the magnetic fraction is not correlated to the parasitemia values listed in Table 1 but is an artifact of the increasing differential sedimentation rate between early stage and late stage forms, as discussed in the text. B) Magnetophoretic mobility as a function of the predominant P. falciparum form showing monotonic increase in mobility with progression from early to late parasite stage. The correlation is significant, as indicated by Spearman rank correlation coefficient,ρ, at P = 0.05%. The fractions of hemoglobin converted to hemozoin in the infected erythrocytes, z, calculated from Equation 4, and the error δz, are also shown.

Lee R. Moore, et al. FASEB J. ;20(6):747-749.
3.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Hemoglobin degradation in malaria-infected erythrocytes determined from live cell magnetophoresis.

A) Magnetophoretic mobility, m, and the corresponding net volume magnetic susceptibility, Δχ , histogram of the control (uninfected) erythrocyte suspension. The mobility is distributed normally around mean peak value of − 0.21 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg, R2 = 0.9696, at χ2 = 0.4230 and P < 0.0001. The cut-off mobility, m0 = 0.75 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg, was set at 95 percentile cumulative mobility (thick line and the left ordinate axis). For reference, the peak mobilities and susceptibilities of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and methemoglobin-converted erythrocytes are also shown (arrows) (20). The number of tracked cells is indicated by N. B) Magnetophoretic mobility, m, and the corresponding net volume magnetic susceptibility, Δχ , histogram of the erythrocyte suspension with predominantly early ring and trophozoite forms (Expt. #1, Table 1). C) Magnetophoretic mobility, m, and the corresponding net volume magnetic susceptibility, Δχ , histogram of the erythrocyte suspension with predominantly late schizont fraction (Expt. #5, Table 1).

Lee R. Moore, et al. FASEB J. ;20(6):747-749.
4.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Hemoglobin degradation in malaria-infected erythrocytes determined from live cell magnetophoresis.

Magnetic path lines (thick, calculated for equal time intervals) and Maxwell stress isolines (thin) that characterize two different field geometries used for magnetic erythrocyte capture and analysis. A) High-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) geometry used for malaria-infected cell capture (22–25) and in the early studies on erythrocyte magnetophoresis (36). A high-gradient magnetic field is induced at the surface of a high-permeability filament (of a circular cross section) by an external magnetic field (represented by its source, rectangular pole pieces N and S, drawn not to scale). Paramagnetic erythrocytes are attracted to the filament in the direction of the N–S axis, depopulating the areas orthogonal to the N–S axis. An efficient capture requires filament packing (22, 23) or spherical bead packing (24, 25) in the form of filter beds. B) Field of hyperbolic pole pieces that provides a highly regular path line pattern in the neighborhood of the plane of pole symmetry [isodynamic field (29)], as indicated by only weak dependence of path lines on position. This improves the precision of the cell tracking velocimetry (CTV) method. Not shown is the erythrocyte gravity sedimentation component. Note difference in scale between (A) and (B).

Lee R. Moore, et al. FASEB J. ;20(6):747-749.

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