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Results: 3

1.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: NAT2 slow acetylation and GSTM1 null genotypes increase bladder cancer risk: results from the Spanish Bladder Cancer Study and meta-analyses.

Meta-analysis of studies of NAT2 slow acetylation genotype and bladder cancer risk (A) and case-only meta-analysis of studies of NAT2 slow acetylation gentype, cigarette smoking and bladder cancer. The horizontal axis plots odds ratios and 95% CI on a logarithmic scale. The size of black circles are proportional to the study size for studies with 50 or more cases, Disagreements between the number of cases for the same study in panels A and B are due to cases with missing smoking information.

Montserrat García-Closas, et al. Lancet. ;366(9486):649-659.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: NAT2 slow acetylation and GSTM1 null genotypes increase bladder cancer risk: results from the Spanish Bladder Cancer Study and meta-analyses.

Meta-analysis of studies of GSTM1 null genotype and bladder cancer risk (A) and case-only meta-analysis of studies of GSTM1 null genotype, cigarette smoking and bladder cancer. The horizontal axis plots odds ratios and 95% CI on a logarithmic scale. The size of black circles are proportional to the study size for studies with 50 or more cases, Disagreements between the number of cases for the same study in panels A and B are due to cases with missing smoking information.

Montserrat García-Closas, et al. Lancet. ;366(9486):649-659.
3.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: NAT2 slow acetylation and GSTM1 null genotypes increase bladder cancer risk: results from the Spanish Bladder Cancer Study and meta-analyses.

Association between increasing smoking intensity (average number of cigarettes per day in categories of 10 cigarettes) and bladder cancer risk compared to never smokers, stratified by NAT2 acetylation genotype. Odds ratios are from conventional logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, region, smoking duration (< 20 years, 20-<30 years, 30-<40 years, 40-<50 years, ≥ 50 years) and smoking cessation (current/former smokers). Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals.

Montserrat García-Closas, et al. Lancet. ;366(9486):649-659.

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