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Results: 5

1.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Egg Quality Assurance Programs and Egg-associated Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States.

Observed annualized rates of change in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis incidence for nine states that were affected by the S. Enteritidis epidemic and adopted state-sponsored EQAPS. The nine states were California, Connecticut, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Utah.

Gerald A. Mumma, et al. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 October;10(10):1782-1789.
2.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Egg Quality Assurance Programs and Egg-associated Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States.

Observed annualized changes in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis incidence for 11 states that were affected by the S. Enteritidis epidemic and adopted state- or industry-sponsored EQAPS. The 11 states were California, Connecticut, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Utah.

Gerald A. Mumma, et al. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 October;10(10):1782-1789.
3.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Egg Quality Assurance Programs and Egg-associated Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States.

Annualized change in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis incidence for groups of states that had egg quality assurance programs (EQAPs) for the same period within group and different periods among groups. The groups of states were 11 states with >1 year of post-EQAP follow-up (Connecticut, Indiana, Pennsylvania, California, South Carolina, Maryland, Ohio, Michigan, Utah, New York, Oregon), 7 states with >2 years of post-EQAP follow-up (Connecticut, Indiana, Pennsylvania, California, South Carolina, Maryland, Ohio), 6 states with >3 years of post-EQAP follow-up (Connecticut, Indiana, Pennsylvania, California, South Carolina, Maryland), and 4 states with >5 years of post-EQAP follow-up (Connecticut, Indiana, Pennsylvania, California).

Gerald A. Mumma, et al. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 October;10(10):1782-1789.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Egg Quality Assurance Programs and Egg-associated Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States.

A) Framework to compare Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis incidence for a given year to the baseline incidence for evidence of intervention effectiveness. Each arrow shows the change of S. Enteritidis incidence for a given year, relative to baseline incidence. The letter a shows increasing S. Enteritidis incidence relative to the baseline incidence, b shows a reduction in S. Enteritidis incidence relative to the baseline incidence, c shows a smaller reduction, d shows no change, and e shows an increase. B) Framework to compare annualized changes in S. Enteritidis incidence for a given year to a baseline incidence for evidence of effectiveness of an intervention. Each dot represents an annualized change in S. Enteritidis incidence relative to the baseline change in S. Enteritidis incidence, which is 0%. The letter a shows preintervention annualized changes in S. Enteritidis incidence that are above the baseline, indicating annual increase in incidence; b shows postintervention annualized changes in S. Enteritidis incidence that are below the baseline; and preintervention rates indicating annual decrease in incidence; c are above baseline but below preintervention rates; d are above baseline but equal to preintervention rates; and e are above preintervention and baseline rates.

Gerald A. Mumma, et al. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 October;10(10):1782-1789.
5.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Egg Quality Assurance Programs and Egg-associated Salmonella Enteritidis Infections, United States.

Reported isolates per 100,000 persons of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by region, United States, 1970–1999. A) New England: Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont. B) Mid-Atlantic: New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania. Pacific: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington. Mountain: Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah. Other states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington DC, West Virginia, Wisconsin. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Salmonella Surveillance System (1).

Gerald A. Mumma, et al. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 October;10(10):1782-1789.

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