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Results: 3

1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping.

Graph of the first two axes from a principal component analysis of 193 maize and 71 teosinte individual plants. The first component explains 3.5% and the second 2.6% of the total variation.

Yoshihiro Matsuoka, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 April 30;99(9):6080-6084.
2.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping.

Geographic distribution of maize and teosinte used in this study. Core Andean maize characterized by hand-grenade-shaped ears (22 samples), other South American maize (47), Guatemalan and southern Mexican maize (31), Caribbean maize (6), lowland western and northern Mexican maize (15), highland Mexican maize (20), eastern and central U.S. maize (24), southwestern U.S. maize (22), northern Mexican maize (6), ssp. parviglumis (34), and ssp. mexicana (33). Inset shows the distribution of the 34 populations of ssp. parviglumis in southern Mexico with the populations that are basal to maize in Fig. 2 (represented as asterisks). The blue line is the Balsas River and its major tributaries.

Yoshihiro Matsuoka, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 April 30;99(9):6080-6084.
3.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping.

Phylogenies of maize and teosinte rooted with ssp. huehuetenangensis based on 99 microsatellites. Dashed gray line circumscribes the monophyletic maize lineage. Asterisks identify those populations of ssp. parviglumis basal to maize, all of which are from the central Balsas River drainage. (a) Individual plant tree based on 193 maize and 71 teosinte. (b) Tree based on 95 ecogeographically defined groups. The numbers on the branches indicate the number of times a clade appeared among 1,000 bootstrap samples. Only bootstrap values greater than 900 are shown. The arrow indicates the position of Oaxacan highland maize that is basal to all of the other maize.

Yoshihiro Matsuoka, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 April 30;99(9):6080-6084.

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