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1.
Figure 3

Figure 3. From: Measuring the thickness of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images.

Histogram of thickness values in cortical regions of the subject shown in Fig. 2. More than 99% of the surface is between 1- and 4.5-mm thick.

Bruce Fischl, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 September 26;97(20):11050-11055.
2.
Figure 5

Figure 5. From: Measuring the thickness of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images.

Map of the standard deviations of the thickness measurements across 30 subjects. Noncortical regions have been excluded on the medial aspect of the surface.

Bruce Fischl, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 September 26;97(20):11050-11055.
3.
Figure 4

Figure 4. From: Measuring the thickness of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images.

Average cortical thickness across 30 subjects, with primary auditory (A1), somatosensory (S1), and visual (V1) cortices indicated by the white arrows.

Bruce Fischl, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 September 26;97(20):11050-11055.
4.
Figure 2

Figure 2. From: Measuring the thickness of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images.

Lateral views of the gray/white (Left), pial (Center), and inflated (Right) surface representations with cortical thickness measurements overlaid in a red/green color scale.

Bruce Fischl, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 September 26;97(20):11050-11055.
5.
Figure 6

Figure 6. From: Measuring the thickness of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images.

Average thickness of posterior (area 3b/1) and anterior (area 4/3a) banks of the central sulcus together with a comparison of manually measured published values [Meyer et al. (20)].

Bruce Fischl, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 September 26;97(20):11050-11055.
6.
Figure 1

Figure 1. From: Measuring the thickness of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images.

Coronal (Left) and horizontal (Right) slices of the left hemisphere with gray/white (yellow) and pial (red) surfaces overlaid. The green crosses indicate a point at which using the coronal view only would result in a dramatic overestimation of the thickness of the cortex.

Bruce Fischl, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 September 26;97(20):11050-11055.

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