Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 14

1.

Long QT syndrome 1

Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS) is purely a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with RWS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a disease-causing mutation in one of the genes associated with RWS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
19831
Concept ID:
C0035828
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Long QT syndrome 2

Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS) is purely a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with RWS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a disease-causing mutation in one of the genes associated with RWS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462293
Concept ID:
C3150943
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Long QT syndrome 3

Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS) is purely a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with RWS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a disease-causing mutation in one of the genes associated with RWS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349087
Concept ID:
C1859062
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Brugada syndrome

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST-segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on ECG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood; although age at diagnosis ranges from two days to 85 years. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and the sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
222975
Concept ID:
C1142166
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Long QT syndrome 5

Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS) is purely a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with RWS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a disease-causing mutation in one of the genes associated with RWS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
358092
Concept ID:
C1867904
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 8

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle; with time, it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336069
Concept ID:
C1843896
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Long QT syndrome 6

Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS) is purely a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with RWS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a disease-causing mutation in one of the genes associated with RWS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462303
Concept ID:
C3150953
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Brugada syndrome 5

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST-segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on ECG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood; although age at diagnosis ranges from two days to 85 years. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and the sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
411607
Concept ID:
C2748541
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Brugada syndrome 2

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST-segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on ECG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood; although age at diagnosis ranges from two days to 85 years. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and the sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
382031
Concept ID:
C2673193
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Brugada syndrome 6

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST-segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on ECG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood; although age at diagnosis ranges from two days to 85 years. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and the sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
413473
Concept ID:
C2751089
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Paroxysmal familial ventricular fibrillation

MedGen UID:
83310
Concept ID:
C0340493
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Ventricular fibrillation, paroxysmal familial, 2

MedGen UID:
442823
Concept ID:
C2751829
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Cardiac conduction defect, nonspecific

MedGen UID:
412576
Concept ID:
C2748542
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Ventricular fibrillation

A cardiac rhythm characterized by rapid, usually more than 300 bpm (cycle length: 180 ms or less), grossly irregular ventricular rhythm with marked variability in QRS cycle length, morphology, and amplitude. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21844
Concept ID:
C0042510
Disease or Syndrome

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity