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Underdeveloped nasal alae

MedGen UID:
507330
Concept ID:
CN000403
Finding
Synonyms: Ala nasi, underdeveloped; Alar cartilage hypoplasia; Hypoplastic alae nasae; Hypoplastic alae nasi; Hypoplastic alar cartilage; Hypoplastic alar nasae; Hypoplastic nares; Hypoplastic nasal alae; Hypoplastic nasal wings; Hypoplastic nostrils; Nasal cartilage hypoplasia; Thin hypoplastic alae nasi
 
HPO: HP:0000430

Definition

Thinned, deficient, or excessively arched ala nasi. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews
  • CROGUnderdeveloped nasal alae

Conditions with this feature

Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Congenital Abnormality
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Hypohidrotic X-linked ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
57890
Concept ID:
C0162359
Congenital Abnormality
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow-growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, and at a later than average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits.
Johanson-Blizzard syndrome
MedGen UID:
59798
Concept ID:
C0175692
Congenital Abnormality
Johanson-Blizzard syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by poor growth, mental retardation, and variable dysmorphic features, including aplasia or hypoplasia of the nasal alae, abnormal hair patterns or scalp defects, and oligodontia. Other features include hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, imperforate anus, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (summary by Al-Dosari et al., 2008).
KBG syndrome
MedGen UID:
66317
Concept ID:
C0220687
Disease or Syndrome
KBG syndrome is characterized by macrodontia of the upper central incisors, distinctive craniofacial findings, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and neurologic involvement that includes global developmental delay, seizures, and intellectual disability (summary by Sirmaci et al., 2011). Sirmaci et al. (2011) noted that it is likely that KBG syndrome is underdiagnosed, since many of the features, including intellectual disability, are mild, and none of the features is a prerequisite for diagnosis.
Shprintzen syndrome
MedGen UID:
65085
Concept ID:
C0220704
Congenital Abnormality
Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a range of findings including the following: Congenital heart disease (74% of individuals), particularly conotruncal malformations (tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, ventricular septal defect, and truncus arteriosus). Palatal abnormalities (69%), particularly velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate. Characteristic facial features (present in the majority of individuals of northern European heritage). Learning difficulties (70%-90%). An immune deficiency (regardless of the clinical presentation) (77%) . Additional findings include the following: Hypocalcemia (50%). Significant feeding and swallowing problems; constipation with or without structural gastrointestinal anomalies (intestinal malrotation, imperforate anus, and Hirschsprung disease). Renal anomalies (31%). Hearing loss (both conductive and sensorineural). Laryngotracheoesophageal anomalies. Growth hormone deficiency. Autoimmune disorders. Seizures (idiopathic or associated with hypocalcemia). CNS anomalies including tethered cord. Skeletal abnormalities (scoliosis with or without vertebral anomalies, clubbed feet, polydactyly, and craniosynostosis). Ophthalmologic abnormalities (strabismus, posterior embryotoxon, tortuous retinal vessels, scleracornea, and anophthalmia). Enamel hypoplasia. Malignancies (rare). Developmental delay (in particular delays in emergence of language), intellectual disability, and learning differences (non-verbal learning disability where the verbal IQ is significantly greater than the performance IQ) are common. Autism or autistic spectrum disorder is found in approximately 20% of children and psychiatric illness (specifically schizophrenia) is present in 25% of adults; however, attention deficit disorder, anxiety, perseveration, and difficulty with social interactions are also common.
Freeman-Sheldon syndrome
MedGen UID:
120516
Concept ID:
C0265224
Congenital Abnormality
Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS), or DA2A, is phenotypically similar to DA1. In addition to contractures of the hands and feet, FSS is characterized by oropharyngeal abnormalities, scoliosis, and a distinctive face that includes a very small oral orifice (often only a few millimeters in diameter at birth), puckered lips, and an H-shaped dimple of the chin; hence, FSS has been called 'whistling face syndrome.' The limb phenotypes of DA1 and FSS may be so similar that they can only be distinguished by the differences in facial morphology (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009).
Cryptophthalmos syndrome
MedGen UID:
82692
Concept ID:
C0265233
Congenital Abnormality
Fraser syndrome is a rare disorder that affects development starting before birth. Characteristic features of this condition include eyes that are completely covered by skin and usually malformed (cryptophthalmos), fusion of the skin between the fingers and toes (cutaneous syndactyly), and abnormalities of the genitalia and the urinary tract (genitourinary anomalies). Other tissues and organs can also be affected. Depending on the severity of the signs and symptoms, Fraser syndrome can be fatal before or shortly after birth; less severely affected individuals can live into childhood or adulthood. Cryptophthalmos is the most common abnormality in people with Fraser syndrome. Both eyes are usually completely covered by skin, but in some cases, only one eye is covered or one or both eyes are partially covered. In cryptophthalmos, the eyes can also be malformed; for example, the eyeballs may be fused to the skin covering them, or they may be small (microphthalmia) or missing (anophthalmia). Eye abnormalities typically lead to impairment or loss of vision in people with Fraser syndrome. Affected individuals can have other problems related to abnormal eye development, including missing eyebrows or eyelashes or a patch of hair extending from the side hairline to the eyebrow. Cutaneous syndactyly typically occurs in both the hands and the feet in Fraser syndrome. In most people with this feature, the skin between the middle three fingers and toes are fused, but the other digits can also be involved. Other abnormalities of the hands and feet can occur in people with Fraser syndrome. Individuals with Fraser syndrome can have abnormalities of the genitalia, such as an enlarged clitoris in females or undescended testes (cryptorchidism) in males. Some affected individuals have external genitalia that do not appear clearly female or male (ambiguous genitalia). The most common urinary tract abnormality in Fraser syndrome is the absence of one or both kidneys (renal agenesis). Affected individuals can have other kidney problems or abnormalities of the bladder and other parts of the urinary tract. A variety of other signs and symptoms can be involved in Fraser syndrome, including heart malformations or abnormalities of the voicebox (larynx) or other parts of the respiratory tract. Some affected individuals have facial abnormalities, including ear or nose abnormalities or an opening in the upper lip (cleft lip) with or without an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate).
Ruvalcaba syndrome
MedGen UID:
120520
Concept ID:
C0265248
Disease or Syndrome
A dysmorphic syndrome characterized by short stature, microcephaly, mental deficiency, peculiar facies, hypoplastic genitalia, and skeletal anomalies.
Femoral hypoplasia - unusual facies syndrome
MedGen UID:
120523
Concept ID:
C0265263
Disease or Syndrome
Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS), also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FHUFS), is a rare and sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising bilateral femoral hypoplasia and characteristic facial features, such as long philtrum, thin upper lip, micrognathia with or without cleft palate, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a short nose with broad tip. Other features, such as renal anomalies, are more variable (summary by Nowaczyk et al., 2010).
Baller-Gerold syndrome
MedGen UID:
120532
Concept ID:
C0265308
Disease or Syndrome
Baller-Gerold syndrome (BGS) is characterized by coronal craniosynostosis, manifest as abnormal shape of the skull (brachycephaly) with ocular proptosis and bulging forehead; radial ray defect, manifest as oligodactyly (reduction in number of digits), aplasia or hypoplasia of the thumb, and/or aplasia or hypoplasia of the radius; growth retardation and poikiloderma. Findings in individuals with BGS overlap with those of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) and RAPADILINO syndrome, also caused by mutations in RECQL4. RTS is characterized by poikiloderma; sparse hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows/lashes; small stature; skeletal and dental abnormalities; cataracts; and an increased risk for cancer, especially osteosarcoma. RAPADILINO syndrome is an acronym for RAdial ray defect; PAtellae hypoplasia or aplasia and cleft or highly arched PAlate; DIarrhea and DIslocated joints; LIttle size and LImb malformation; NOse slender and NOrmal intelligence.
Symphalangism-brachydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
90977
Concept ID:
C0342282
Congenital Abnormality
Follicular atrophoderma and basal cell epitheliomata
MedGen UID:
87539
Concept ID:
C0346104
Neoplastic Process
Bazex syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by a triad of congenital hypotrichosis, follicular atrophoderma affecting the dorsa of the hands and feet, the face, and extensor surfaces of the elbows or knees, and the development of basal cell neoplasms, including basal cell nevi and basal cell carcinomas from the second decade onward (Yung and Newton-Bishop, 2005). Rombo syndrome (180730) has similar features, but shows autosomal dominant inheritance.
Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
95931
Concept ID:
C0392475
Congenital Abnormality
Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by prenatal growth retardation (ranging from mild to severe), craniofacial findings (including microcephaly and cleft lip and/or palate) and limb malformations (including bilateral symmetric tetraphocomelia or hypomelia caused by mesomelic shortening). Upper limbs are more severely affected than lower limbs. Other limb malformations include oligodactyly with thumb aplasia or hypoplasia, syndactyly, clinodactyly, and elbow and knee flexion contractures. Craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and/or cleft palate, premaxillary prominence, micrognathia, microbrachycephaly, malar flattening, downslanted palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, exophthalmos resulting from shallow orbits, corneal clouding, underdeveloped ala nasi, beaked nose, and ear malformations. Intellectual disability is reported in the majority of affected individuals. Mortality is high among severely affected pregnancies and newborns. Mildly affected individuals may survive to adulthood.
Boomerang dysplasia
MedGen UID:
96579
Concept ID:
C0432201
Disease or Syndrome
The FLNB-related disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild (spondylocarpotarsal synostosis [SCT] syndrome and Larsen syndrome) to severe (atelosteogenesis types I [AOI] and III [AOIII], boomerang dysplasia). SCT syndrome is characterized by disproportionate short stature, block vertebrae, scoliosis and lordosis, carpal and tarsal fusion, club feet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, and mild facial dysmorphisms. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; club feet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; and distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, andwidely spaced eyes). Both can have midline cleft palate and conductive hearing loss. AOIII and AOI are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and club feet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period.
Floating-Harbor syndrome
MedGen UID:
152667
Concept ID:
C0729582
Disease or Syndrome
Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is characterized by typical craniofacial features; low birth weight, normal head circumference, and short stature; bone age delay that normalizes between ages six and 12 years; skeletal anomalies (brachydactyly, clubbing, clinodactyly, short thumbs, prominent joints, clavicular abnormalities); severe receptive and expressive language impairment; hypernasality and high-pitched voice; and intellectual disability that is typically mild to moderate. Difficulties with temperament and behavior that are present in many children tend to improve in adulthood. Other features can include: hyperopia and/or strabismus; conductive hearing loss; seizures; gastroesophageal reflux; renal anomalies (e.g., hydronephrosis/renal pelviectasis, cysts, and/or agenesis) and genital anomalies (e.g., hypospadias and/or undescended testes).
Faciocardiorenal syndrome
MedGen UID:
208649
Concept ID:
C0795936
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of characteristic facies, horseshoe kidney, congenital heart defect, and delayed mental and physical development.
Filippi syndrome
MedGen UID:
163197
Concept ID:
C0795940
Disease or Syndrome
A craniodigital syndrome characterized by unusual facial appearance with microcephaly, high frontal hairline, thin nose with deep epicanthal folds, and short palpebral fissures in association with cleft palate, digital anomalies, and developmental delay.
Mac Dermot Winter syndrome
MedGen UID:
162900
Concept ID:
C0796024
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of prenatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, dysmorphic facies, absent psychomotor development, hypoplastic genitalia, convulsions, and other disorders.
McDonough syndrome
MedGen UID:
162902
Concept ID:
C0796038
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of psychomotor retardation, characteristic facies, kyphoscoliosis, diastasis recti, cryptorchidism, and congenital heart defect. Named after Dr. Kenneth B. McDonough, who referred to the authors the original family affected with this syndrome
Pashayan syndrome
MedGen UID:
163226
Concept ID:
C0796197
Disease or Syndrome
Telecanthus, displacement of the lacrimal puncta, lacrimal defects, masklike facies, and mental deficiency.
Woods syndrome
MedGen UID:
490089
Concept ID:
C0796203
Disease or Syndrome
A craniodigital syndrome of prenatal growth retardation, microcephaly, mental retardation, syndactyly of the fingers, and minor facial anomalies.
Oculodentodigital dysplasia
MedGen UID:
167236
Concept ID:
C0812437
Disease or Syndrome
Oculodentodigital syndrome is characterized by a typical facial appearance and variable involvement of the eyes, dentition, and fingers. Characteristic facial features include a narrow, pinched nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, prominent columella and thin anteverted nares together with a narrow nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds giving the impression of hypertelorism. The teeth are usually small and carious. Typical eye findings include microphthalmia and microcornea. The characteristic digital malformation is complete syndactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers (syndactyly type III) but the third finger may be involved and associated camptodactyly is a common finding (summary by Judisch et al., 1979). Neurologic abnormalities are sometimes associated (Gutmann et al., 1991), and lymphedema has been reported in some patients with ODDD (Brice et al., 2013). See review by De Bock et al. (2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculodentodigital Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of ODDD (257850) is also caused by mutation in the GJA1 gene, but the majority of cases are autosomal dominant.
SHORT syndrome
MedGen UID:
164212
Concept ID:
C0878684
Disease or Syndrome
'Short,' the mnemonic designation for this syndrome, is an acronym: S = stature; H = hyperextensibility of joints or hernia (inguinal) or both; O = ocular depression; R = Rieger anomaly; T = teething delay. The name was given by Gorlin (1975), who described the syndrome in 2 brothers. Dyment et al. (2013) noted that the features listed in the acronym for SHORT syndrome do not capture the full range of the clinical phenotype, which can include a recognizable facial gestalt consisting of triangular facies, lack of facial fat, and hypoplastic nasal alae with overhanging columella, as well as near-universal partial lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, nephrocalcinosis, and hearing deficits. Notably, both developmental milestones and cognition are normal for individuals with SHORT syndrome.
Barber-Say syndrome
MedGen UID:
230818
Concept ID:
C1319466
Disease or Syndrome
Barber-Say syndrome is a rare congenital condition characterized by severe hypertrichosis, especially of the back, skin abnormalities such as hyperlaxity and redundancy, and facial dysmorphism, including macrostomia, eyelid deformities, ocular telecanthus, abnormal and low-set ears, bulbous nasal tip with hypoplastic alae nasi, and low frontal hairline (summary by Roche et al., 2010). Ablepharon-macrostomia syndrome (AMS; 200110) is a similar but apparently distinct disorder, distinguished by the fact that AMS patients have ablepharon or microblepharon rather than ectropion and more severe genital abnormalities (Stevens and Sargent, 2002).
Oral-facial-digital syndrome
MedGen UID:
307142
Concept ID:
C1510460
Disease or Syndrome
Oral-facial-digital syndrome type I (OFD1) is associated with dysfunction of primary cilia and is characterized by the following abnormalities: Oral (lobed tongue, hamartomas or lipomas of the tongue, cleft of the hard or soft palate, accessory gingival frenulae, hypodontia, and other dental abnormalities). Facial (widely spaced eyes or telecanthus, hypoplasia of the alae nasi, median cleft or pseudocleft upper lip, micrognathia) . Digital (brachydactyly, syndactyly of varying degrees, and clinodactyly of the fifth finger; duplicated hallux [great toe]; preaxial or postaxial polydactyly of the hands). Brain (intracerebral cysts, corpus callosum agenesis, cerebellar agenesis with or without Dandy-Walker malformation) . Kidney (polycystic kidney disease). As many as 50% of individuals with OFD1 have some degree of intellectual disability, which is usually mild. Almost all affected individuals are female. However, males with OFD1 have been described, mostly as malformed fetuses delivered by women with OFD1.
Rapp-Hodgkin ectodermal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
315656
Concept ID:
C1785148
Disease or Syndrome
Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome is a form of ectodermal dysplasia, a group of about 150 conditions characterized by abnormal development of ectodermal tissues including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands. Among the most common features of AEC syndrome are missing patches of skin (erosions). In affected infants, skin erosions most commonly occur on the scalp. They tend to recur throughout childhood and into adulthood, frequently affecting the scalp, neck, hands, and feet. The skin erosions range from mild to severe and can lead to infection, scarring, and hair loss. Other ectodermal abnormalities in AEC syndrome include changes in skin coloring; brittle, sparse, or missing hair; misshapen or absent fingernails and toenails; and malformed or missing teeth. Affected individuals also report increased sensitivity to heat and a reduced ability to sweat. Many infants with AEC syndrome are born with an eyelid condition known as ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum, in which strands of tissue partially or completely fuse the upper and lower eyelids. Most people with AEC syndrome are also born with an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate), a split in the lip (a cleft lip), or both. Cleft lip or cleft palate can make it difficult for affected infants to suck, so these infants often have trouble feeding and do not grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Additional features of AEC syndrome can include limb abnormalities, most commonly fused fingers and toes (syndactyly). Less often, affected individuals have permanently bent fingers and toes (camptodactyly) or a deep split in the hands or feet with missing fingers or toes and fusion of the remaining digits (ectrodactyly). Hearing loss is common, occurring in more than 90 percent of children with AEC syndrome. Some affected individuals have distinctive facial features, such as small jaws that cannot open fully and a narrow space between the upper lip and nose (philtrum). Other signs and symptoms can include the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias) in affected males, digestive problems, absent tear duct openings in the eyes, and chronic sinus or ear infections. A condition known as Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome has signs and symptoms that overlap considerably with those of AEC syndrome. These two syndromes were classified as separate disorders until it was discovered that they both result from mutations in the same part of the same gene. Most researchers now consider Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome and AEC syndrome to be part of the same disease spectrum.
Microcephaly, congenital heart disease, unilateral renal agenesis, and hyposegmented lungs
MedGen UID:
371329
Concept ID:
C1832436
Disease or Syndrome
Potocki-Shaffer syndrome
MedGen UID:
318657
Concept ID:
C1832588
Disease or Syndrome
Potocki-Shaffer syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion syndrome due to haploinsufficiency of the 11p12-p11.2 region and is characterized by craniofacial abnormalities, developmental delay, intellectual disability, multiple exostoses (168500), and biparietal foramina (605957) (summary by Swarr et al., 2010).
Marden Walker like syndrome
MedGen UID:
322127
Concept ID:
C1833136
Disease or Syndrome
Van den Endo-Gupta syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe contractual arachnodactyly from birth and distinctive facial dysmorphism, including triangular face, malar hypoplasia, narrow nose, everted lips, and blepharophimosis. Skeletal anomalies include slender ribs, hooked clavicles, and dislocated radial head. There is no neurologic involvement (summary by Patel et al., 2014).
Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease
MedGen UID:
373160
Concept ID:
C1836727
Disease or Syndrome
The neurologic variant of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a complex neurocristopathy that includes features of 4 distinct syndromes: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy (see 118200), central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (see 142623) (Inoue et al., 2004). Inoue et al. (2004) proposed the acronym PCWH for this disorder.
Burn-Mckeown syndrome
MedGen UID:
325265
Concept ID:
C1837822
Disease or Syndrome
Brachydactyly-Mental Retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
373895
Concept ID:
C1838126
Disease or Syndrome
2q37 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by mild-moderate developmental delay/intellectual disability, brachymetaphalangy of digits 3-5 (often digit 4 alone) (>50%), short stature, obesity, hypotonia, characteristic facial appearance, autism or autism spectrum disorder (30%), joint hypermobility/dislocation, and scoliosis. Other findings include seizures (20%-35%), congenital heart disease, CNS abnormalities (hydrocephalus, dilated ventricles), umbilical/inguinal hernia, tracheomalacia, situs abnormalities, gastrointestinal abnormalities, and renal malformations. Wilms tumor has been reported in two individuals.
Granddad syndrome
MedGen UID:
330701
Concept ID:
C1841836
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
376211
Concept ID:
C1847800
Congenital Abnormality
Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder comprising congenital sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances of the iris, hair, and skin, along with dystopia canthorum (lateral displacement of the inner canthi). The hearing loss in WS1, observed in approximately 60% of affected individuals, is congenital, typically non-progressive, either unilateral or bilateral, and sensorineural. Most commonly, hearing loss in WS1 is bilateral and profound (>100 dB). The majority of individuals with WS1 have either a white forelock or early graying of the scalp hair before age 30 years. The classic white forelock observed in approximately 45% of individuals is the most common hair pigmentation anomaly seen in WS1. Affected individuals may have complete heterochromia iridium, partial/segmental heterochromia, or hypoplastic or brilliant blue irides. Congenital leukoderma is frequently seen on the face, trunk, or limbs.
Whistling face syndrome, recessive form
MedGen UID:
376364
Concept ID:
C1848470
Disease or Syndrome
Whistling face syndrome is characterized by an atypical facial appearance with anomalies of the hands and feet. Most cases show autosomal dominant inheritance: see distal arthrogryposis 2A (DA2A; 193700). There are rare reports of presumably autosomal recessive inheritance (summary by Altunhan et al., 2010).
Pseudopapilledema, ocular hypotelorism, blepharophimosis, and hand anomalies
MedGen UID:
337882
Concept ID:
C1849661
Disease or Syndrome
Popliteal pterygium syndrome lethal type
MedGen UID:
337894
Concept ID:
C1849718
Disease or Syndrome
Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (lethal popliteal pterygium syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple popliteal pterygia, ankyloblepharon, filiform bands between the jaws, cleft lip and palate, and syndactyly. Early lethality is common, although survival into childhood and beyond has been reported (summary by Mitchell et al., 2012). A less severe form of popliteal pterygium syndrome (119500) is caused by mutation in the IRF6 gene (607199).
Laurin-Sandrow syndrome
MedGen UID:
340697
Concept ID:
C1851100
Disease or Syndrome
Deafness-craniofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
342201
Concept ID:
C1852278
Disease or Syndrome
Mastocytosis cutaneous with short stature conductive hearing loss and microtia
MedGen UID:
383661
Concept ID:
C1855345
Disease or Syndrome
Keutel syndrome
MedGen UID:
383722
Concept ID:
C1855607
Disease or Syndrome
Frontofacionasal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
341599
Concept ID:
C1856687
Disease or Syndrome
The features of frontofacionasal dysplasia include blepharophimosis, lower lid lagophthalmos, primary telecanthus, S-shaped palpebral fissues, facial hypoplasia, eyelid coloboma, widow's peak, cranium bifidum occultum, frontal lipoma, nasal hypoplasia, deformed nostrils, bifid nose, and cleft of lip, premaxilla, palate, and uvula (White et al., 1991). Also see frontonasal dysplasia (136760).
Gingival fibromatosis with distinctive facies
MedGen UID:
346437
Concept ID:
C1856761
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacial dyssynostosis
MedGen UID:
347473
Concept ID:
C1857511
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar vermis aplasia with associated features suggesting Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome and Meckel syndrome
MedGen UID:
347120
Concept ID:
C1859300
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 2
MedGen UID:
347148
Concept ID:
C1859451
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II is characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, severe proportionate short stature, and microcephaly. It is distinct from Seckel syndrome (see 210600) by more severe growth retardation, radiologic abnormalities, and absent or mild mental retardation (summary by Willems et al., 2010).
Coloboma of alar-nasal cartilages with telecanthus
MedGen UID:
348504
Concept ID:
C1859964
Disease or Syndrome
Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome
MedGen UID:
395439
Concept ID:
C1860224
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 2A
MedGen UID:
349786
Concept ID:
C1860339
Disease or Syndrome
Waardenburg syndrome type 2 is an autosomal dominant auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, skin, and eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; and the absence of 'dystopia canthorum,' the lateral displacement of the ocular inner canthi, which is seen in some other forms of WS (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). Waardenburg syndrome type 2A is caused by mutation in the MITF gene (156845). Clinical Variability of Waardenburg Syndrome Types 1-4 Waardenburg syndrome has been classified into 4 main phenotypes. Type I Waardenburg syndrome (WS1; 193500) is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, including a white forelock and premature graying; pigmentary changes of the iris, such as heterochromia iridis and brilliant blue eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; and 'dystopia canthorum.' WS type II (WS2) is distinguished from type I by the absence of dystopia canthorum. WS type III (WS3; 148820) has dystopia canthorum and is distinguished by the presence of upper limb abnormalities. WS type IV (WS4; 277580), also known as Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, has the additional feature of Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 2 Waardenburg syndrome type 2 is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. WS2B (600193) has been mapped to chromosome 1p, WS2C (606662) has been mapped to chromosome 8p23, WSD (608890) is caused by mutation in the SNAI2 gene (602150) on chromosome 8q11, and WS2E (611584) is caused by mutation in the SOX10 gene (602229) on chromosome 22q13.
Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type 3
MedGen UID:
349899
Concept ID:
C1860823
Disease or Syndrome
Tibia, hypoplasia of, with polydactyly
MedGen UID:
348786
Concept ID:
C1861098
Disease or Syndrome
Anonychia-onychodystrophy with hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges
MedGen UID:
354848
Concept ID:
C1862841
Disease or Syndrome
Familial anonychia/onychodystrophy with hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges (ODP) is a rare disorder characterized by onychodystrophy, anonychia, brachydactyly of the fifth finger, and digitalization of the thumbs, with absence or hypoplasia of the distal phalanges of the hands and feet. Generally the nails of the first to third digits are progressively deformed with total anonychia in the last 2 digits and in all toes (summary by Genzer-Nir et al., 2010). A syndrome has been described in which affected females display juvenile hypertrophy of the breast (JHB; 113670) in association with ODP, whereas males have only ODP (mammary-digital-nail syndrome; 613689).
Frias syndrome
MedGen UID:
400621
Concept ID:
C1864825
Disease or Syndrome
Frias syndrome is characterized by mild exophthalmia, palpebral ptosis, hypertelorism, short square hands with minimal proximal syndactyly between the second and third fingers, small broad great toes, and short stature. Some patients may exhibit bilateral pedunculated postminimi (summary by Martinez-Fernandez et al., 2014).
17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
355853
Concept ID:
C1864871
Disease or Syndrome
The KANSL1-related intellectual disability syndrome is characterized by developmental delay/intellectual disability, neonatal/childhood hypotonia, dysmorphisms, congenital malformations, and behavioral features. Global psychomotor developmental delay is noted in all individuals from an early age. The majority of individuals with the KANSL1-related intellectual disability syndrome function in the mild to moderate range of intellectual disability. Other findings include epilepsy (55%), congenital heart defects (39%), renal and urologic anomalies (37%), and cryptorchidism (71% of males). Behavior in most is described as friendly, amiable, and cooperative.
Otofacioosseous-gonadal syndrome
MedGen UID:
356416
Concept ID:
C1865988
Disease or Syndrome
Stapes ankylosis with broad thumb and toes
MedGen UID:
357104
Concept ID:
C1866656
Disease or Syndrome
Simosa cranio facial syndrome
MedGen UID:
356655
Concept ID:
C1866962
Disease or Syndrome
Synostoses, tarsal, carpal, and digital
MedGen UID:
360296
Concept ID:
C1876184
Anatomical Abnormality
Mental retardation, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
370849
Concept ID:
C1970199
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 6pter-p24 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
393396
Concept ID:
C2675486
Disease or Syndrome
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with pyloric atresia
MedGen UID:
436922
Concept ID:
C2677349
Disease or Syndrome
EBS-PA is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by severe skin blistering at birth and congenital pyloric atresia. Death usually occurs in infancy. In reports of 2 consensus meetings for EB, Fine et al. (2000, 2008) considered EBS-PA to be a 'basal' form of simplex EB because the electron microscopy shows that skin cleavage occurs in the lower basal level of the keratinocyte, just above the hemidesmosome. There is often decreased integration of keratin filaments with hemidesmosomes.
Stevenson-Carey syndrome
MedGen UID:
383183
Concept ID:
C2677763
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, distal
MedGen UID:
395634
Concept ID:
C2678480
Disease or Syndrome
Oculodentodigital dysplasia, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
412708
Concept ID:
C2749477
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 19q13.11 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
414432
Concept ID:
C2751651
Disease or Syndrome
Zechi Ceide syndrome
MedGen UID:
416693
Concept ID:
C2752047
Disease or Syndrome
15q24 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462024
Concept ID:
C3150674
Disease or Syndrome
The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay; mild to severe (usually at least moderate) intellectual disability; facial dysmorphisms; congenital malformations of the hands and feet, eye, and genitalia; joint laxity; and growth retardation and failure to thrive. Less common findings include: seizures; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hypospadias and/ or micropenis. Males and females are affected equally.
Frontonasal dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
462056
Concept ID:
C3150706
Disease or Syndrome
Frontonasal dysplasia is a condition that results from abnormal development of the head and face before birth. People with frontonasal dysplasia have at least two of the following features: widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism); a broad nose; a slit (cleft) in one or both sides of the nose; no nasal tip; a central cleft involving the nose, upper lip, or roof of the mouth (palate); incomplete formation of the front of the skull with skin covering the head where bone should be (anterior cranium bifidum occultum); or a widow's peak hairline. Other features of frontonasal dysplasia can include additional facial malformations, absence or malformation of the tissue that connects the left and right halves of the brain (the corpus callosum), and intellectual disability. There are at least three types of frontonasal dysplasia that are distinguished by their genetic causes and their signs and symptoms. In addition to the features previously described, each type of frontonasal dysplasia is associated with other distinctive features. Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 1 typically have abnormalities of the nose, a long area between the nose and upper lip (philtrum), and droopy upper eyelids (ptosis). Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 2 can have hair loss (alopecia) and an enlarged opening in the two bones that make up much of the top and sides of the skull (enlarged parietal foramina). Males with this form of the condition often have genital abnormalities. Features of frontonasal dysplasia type 3 include eyes that are missing (anophthalmia) or very small (microphthalmia) and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Frontonasal dysplasia type 3 is typically associated with the most severe facial abnormalities, but the severity of the condition varies widely, even among individuals with the same type. Life expectancy of affected individuals depends on the severity of the malformations and whether or not surgical intervention can improve associated health problems, such as breathing and feeding problems caused by the facial clefts.
Meier-Gorlin syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
462447
Concept ID:
C3151097
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect. Some people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age). Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge. Abnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair. Additional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.
OGDEN SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
477078
Concept ID:
C3275447
Disease or Syndrome
Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome
MedGen UID:
481430
Concept ID:
C3279800
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 8q21.11 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
481861
Concept ID:
C3280231
Disease or Syndrome
The chromosome 8q21.11 deletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability and common facial dysmorphic features (summary by Palomares et al., 2011).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Romo T 3rd, Shapiro AL
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1992 Aug;118(8):837-41. PMID: 1642835

Prognosis

Romo T 3rd, Shapiro AL
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1992 Aug;118(8):837-41. PMID: 1642835

Clinical prediction guides

Romo T 3rd, Shapiro AL
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1992 Aug;118(8):837-41. PMID: 1642835

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