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Results: 17

1.

Incontinentia pigmenti syndrome

Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a disorder that affects the skin, hair, teeth, nails, eyes, and central nervous system. Characteristic skin lesions evolve through four stages: I. blistering (birth to age ~4 months); II. a wart-like rash (for several months); III. swirling macular hyperpigmentation (age ~6 months into adulthood); and IV. linear hypopigmentation. Alopecia, hypodontia, abnormal tooth shape, and dystrophic nails are observed. Neovascularization of the retina, present in some individuals, predisposes to retinal detachment. Neurologic findings including cognitive delays/intellectual disability are occasionally seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
7049
Concept ID:
C0021171
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in nonscarring blisters caused by little or no trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 12 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, Dowling-Meara type (EBS-DM). EBS, other generalized (EBS, gen-nonDM; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP) . The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen-non DM, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-DM. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-DM; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-DM, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both within and among families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. EBS-DM appears to improve with warmth in some individuals. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-DM may interfere with feeding. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140934
Concept ID:
C0432316
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Pachyonychia congenita, type 1

Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is characterized by hypertrophic nail dystrophy, painful palmoplantar keratoderma and blistering, oral leukokeratosis, pilosebaceous cysts (including steatocystoma and vellus hair cysts), palmoplantar hyperhydrosis, and follicular keratoses on the trunk and extremities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
353335
Concept ID:
C1706595
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, autosomal recessive

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some cases) that results in nonscarring blisters caused by little or no trauma. The current classification of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) includes two major types and 12 minor subtypes of EBS; all share the common feature of blistering above the dermal-epidermal junction at the ultrastructural level. The four most common subtypes of EBS are the focus of this GeneReview: EBS, localized (EBS-loc; previously known as Weber-Cockayne type). EBS, Dowling-Meara type (EBS-DM). EBS, other generalized (EBS, gen-nonDM; previously known as Koebner type). EBS-with mottled pigmentation (EBS-MP) . The phenotypes for these subtypes range from relatively mild blistering of the hands and feet to more generalized blistering, which can be fatal. In EBS-loc, blisters are rarely present or minimal at birth and may occur on the knees and shins with crawling or on the feet at approximately age18 months; some individuals manifest the disease in adolescence or early adulthood. Blisters are usually confined to the hands and feet, but can occur anywhere if trauma is significant. In EBS, gen-non DM, blisters may be present at birth or develop within the first few months of life. Involvement is more widespread than in EBS-loc, but generally milder than in EBS-DM. In EBS-MP, skin fragility is evident at birth and clinically indistinguishable from EBS-DM; over time, progressive brown pigmentation interspersed with hypopigmented spots develops on the trunk and extremities, with the pigmentation disappearing in adult life. Focal palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses may occur. In EBS-DM, onset is usually at birth; severity varies greatly, both within and among families. Widespread and severe blistering and/or multiple grouped clumps of small blisters are typical and hemorrhagic blisters are common. Improvement occurs during mid- to late childhood. EBS-DM appears to improve with warmth in some individuals. Progressive hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles begins in childhood and may be the major complaint of affected individuals in adult life. Nail dystrophy and milia are common. Both hyper- and hypopigmentation can occur. Mucosal involvement in EBS-DM may interfere with feeding. Blistering can be severe enough to result in neonatal or infant death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371444
Concept ID:
C1832926
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Growth of nails

MedGen UID:
98400
Concept ID:
C0423801
Finding
6.

Rapp-Hodgkin ectodermal dysplasia syndrome

Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome is a form of ectodermal dysplasia, a group of about 150 conditions characterized by abnormal development of ectodermal tissues including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands. Among the most common features of AEC syndrome are missing patches of skin (erosions). In affected infants, skin erosions most commonly occur on the scalp. They tend to recur throughout childhood and into adulthood, frequently affecting the scalp, neck, hands, and feet. The skin erosions range from mild to severe and can lead to infection, scarring, and hair loss. Other ectodermal abnormalities in AEC syndrome include changes in skin coloring; brittle, sparse, or missing hair; misshapen or absent fingernails and toenails; and malformed or missing teeth. Affected individuals also report increased sensitivity to heat and a reduced ability to sweat. Many infants with AEC syndrome are born with an eyelid condition known as ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum, in which strands of tissue partially or completely fuse the upper and lower eyelids. Most people with AEC syndrome are also born with an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate), a split in the lip (a cleft lip), or both. Cleft lip or cleft palate can make it difficult for affected infants to suck, so these infants often have trouble feeding and do not grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Additional features of AEC syndrome can include limb abnormalities, most commonly fused fingers and toes (syndactyly). Less often, affected individuals have permanently bent fingers and toes (camptodactyly) or a deep split in the hands or feet with missing fingers or toes and fusion of the remaining digits (ectrodactyly). Hearing loss is common, occurring in more than 90 percent of children with AEC syndrome. Some affected individuals have distinctive facial features, such as small jaws that cannot open fully and a narrow space between the upper lip and nose (philtrum). Other signs and symptoms can include the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias) in affected males, digestive problems, absent tear duct openings in the eyes, and chronic sinus or ear infections. A condition known as Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome has signs and symptoms that overlap considerably with those of AEC syndrome. These two syndromes were classified as separate disorders until it was discovered that they both result from mutations in the same part of the same gene. Most researchers now consider Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome and AEC syndrome to be part of the same disease spectrum.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
315656
Concept ID:
C1785148
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis

Verloes et al. (1992) described a rare variant of frontonasal dysplasia (FND; 136760), designated acromelic frontonasal dysplasia (AFND), in which similar craniofacial anomalies are associated with variable central nervous system malformations and limb defects including tibial hypoplasia/aplasia, talipes equinovarus, and preaxial polydactyly of the feet. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
350933
Concept ID:
C1863616
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Haim-Munk syndrome

MedGen UID:
344539
Concept ID:
C1855627
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Twenty nail dystrophy

Many types of nonsyndromic congenital nail disorders (NDNC) have been described. Twenty-nail dystrophy (TND), also known as trachyonychia (from the Greek for 'rough nails'), is an autosomal dominant nail dystrophy characterized by excessive longitudinal striations and numerous superficial pits on the nails, which have a distinctive rough sandpaper-like appearance. Occasionally some nails are spared. The slowly progressive condition is usually apparent at birth and may be self-limiting, with spontaneous resolution in some patients (summary by Sehgal, 2007). TND is referred to here as nonsyndromic congenital nail disorder-1 (NCNC1). Other Nonsyndromic Congenital Nail Disorders Other nonsyndromic congenital nail disorders include koilonychia (NDNC2; 149300); leukonychia (NDNC3; 151600) caused by mutation in the PLCD1 gene (602142) on chromosome 3p22-p21.3; anonychia/hyponychia (NDNC4; 206800) caused by mutation in the RSPO4 gene (610673) on chromosome 20p13; partial onycholysis with scleronychia (NDNC5; 164800); anonychia of thumbs with onychodystrophy of other nails (NDNC6; 107000); onychodystrophy mapping to chromosome 17p13 (NDNC7; 605779); toenail dystrophy (NDNC8; 607523) caused by mutation in the COL7A1 gene (120120) on chromosome 3p21.3; onychodystrophy mapping to chromosome 17q25.1-q25.3 (NDNC9; 614149); and onychodystrophy (NDNC10; 614157) caused by mutation in the FZD6 gene (603409) on chromosome 8q22.3-q23.1. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
96056
Concept ID:
C0406443
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Pachyonychia congenita, recessive

MedGen UID:
337972
Concept ID:
C1850103
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Inflammatory skin and bowel disease, neonatal

MedGen UID:
482131
Concept ID:
C3280501
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, subacute, of leigh, adult

MedGen UID:
331718
Concept ID:
C1834340
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Ectodermal dysplasia, hidrotic, Christianson-Fourie type

MedGen UID:
371322
Concept ID:
C1832411
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Orofacial cleft 8

MedGen UID:
377541
Concept ID:
C1851878
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Incontinentia pigmenti, familial male-lethal type

MedGen UID:
443905
Concept ID:
C2930820
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate, Nonsyndromic, 8

MedGen UID:
342113
Concept ID:
C1851879
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Thick nail

Nail that appears thick when viewed on end. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504956
Concept ID:
CN001635
Finding

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