Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
  • Quoted phrase not found.

Thick lower lip vermilion

MedGen UID:
504381
Concept ID:
CN000174
Finding
Synonyms: Full lower lip; Prominent lower lip; Thick lower lip
 
HPO: HP:0000179

Definition

Increased thickness of the lower lip, leading to a prominent appearance of the lower lip. The height of the vermilion of the lower lip in the midline is more than 2 SD above the mean. Alternatively, an apparently increased height of the vermilion of the lower lip in the frontal view (subjective). [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews
  • CROGThick lower lip vermilion

Conditions with this feature

Fabry's disease
MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase (a-Gal A) and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesias), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhydrosis, hypohydosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, they may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity may have either (1) a cardiac variant phenotype that usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, mitral insufficiency and/or cardiomyopathy, and proteinuria, but without ESRD; or (2) a renal variant phenotype, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain.
5p partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
41345
Concept ID:
C0010314
Congenital Abnormality
Cri-du-chat syndrome was first described by Lejeune et al. (1963) as a hereditary congenital syndrome associated with deletion of part of the short arm of chromosome 5. The deletions can vary in size from extremely small and involving only band 5p15.2 to the entire short arm. Although the majority of deletions arise as new mutations, approximately 12% result from unbalanced segregation of translocations or recombination involving a pericentric inversion in one of the parents.
Fucosidosis
MedGen UID:
5288
Concept ID:
C0016788
Disease or Syndrome
Fucosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by defective alpha-L-fucosidase with accumulation of fucose in the tissues. Clinical features include angiokeratoma, progressive psychomotor retardation, neurologic signs, coarse facial features, and dysostosis multiplex. Fucosidosis has been classified into 2 major types. Type 1 is characterized by rapid psychomotor regression and severe neurologic deterioration beginning at about 6 months of age, elevated sweat sodium chloride, and death within the first decade of life. Type 2 is characterized by milder psychomotor retardation and neurologic signs, the development of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum, normal sweat salinity, and longer survival (Kousseff et al., 1976).
Hypomelanosis of Ito
MedGen UID:
5920
Concept ID:
C0022283
Disease or Syndrome
A neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by a bizarre, more or less symmetrical leukoderma with depigmented streaks, patches, and whorls, sometimes associated with hyperkeratosis follicularis. Associated disorders include seizures, psychomotor retardation, macrocephaly, and ophthalmological and other abnormalities.
Lipid proteinosis
MedGen UID:
6112
Concept ID:
C0023795
Disease or Syndrome
Lipoid proteinosis of Urbach and Wiethe is a rare autosomal recessive disorder typified by generalized thickening of skin, mucosae, and certain viscera. Classic features include beaded eyelid papules and laryngeal infiltration leading to hoarseness. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous, with affected individuals displaying differing degrees of skin scarring and infiltration, variable signs of hoarseness and respiratory distress, and in some cases neurologic abnormalities such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Histologically, there is widespread deposition of hyaline (glycoprotein) material and disruption/reduplication of basement membrane (summary by Hamada et al., 2002 and Hamada et al., 2003).
Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome
MedGen UID:
6291
Concept ID:
C0025235
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome characterized by recurrent facial nerve paralysis, edema of the lips and face, and furrowed tongue.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 2b
MedGen UID:
9959
Concept ID:
C0025269
Neoplastic Process
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is classified into three subtypes: MEN 2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma), and MEN 2B. All three subtypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN 2A and MEN 2B have an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN 2A has an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN 2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and a ‘marfanoid’ habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN 2B, early adulthood in MEN 2A, and middle age in FMTC.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II
MedGen UID:
7734
Concept ID:
C0026705
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; also known as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by glycosaminoglycans (GAG) accumulation. The vast majority of affected individuals are male; on rare occasion heterozygous females manifest findings. Age of onset, disease severity, and rate of progression vary significantly among affected males. In those with early progressive disease, CNS involvement (manifest primarily by progressive cognitive deterioration), progressive airway disease, and cardiac disease usually result in death in the first or second decade of life. In those with slowly progressive disease, the CNS is not (or is minimally) affected, although the effect of GAG accumulation on other organ systems may be early progressive to the same degree as in those who have progressive cognitive decline. Survival into the early adult years with normal intelligence is common in the slowly progressing form of the disease. Additional findings in both forms of MPS II include: short stature; macrocephaly with or without communicating hydrocephalus; macroglossia; hoarse voice; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hepato-splenomegaly; dysostosis multiplex; spinal stenosis; and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-I-S
MedGen UID:
6453
Concept ID:
C0026708
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes, Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome, no biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap; thus, affected individuals are best described as having either severe or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory-tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal. By age three years, linear growth ceases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound. Hearing loss is common. Death, typically caused by cardiorespiratory failure, usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decades to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities can be present. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. Hearing loss and cardiac valvular disease are common.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-III-D
MedGen UID:
88602
Concept ID:
C0086650
Disease or Syndrome
The mucopolysaccharidoses are a family of lysosomal storage diseases caused by deficiencies of enzymes required for the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans. The defects result in accumulation of excessive intralysosomal glycosoaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides) in various tissues, causing distended lysosomes to accumulate in the cell and interfere with cell function. Multiple types have been described (Mok et al., 2003).
Hurler syndrome
MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes, Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome, no biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap; thus, affected individuals are best described as having either severe or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory-tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal. By age three years, linear growth ceases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound. Hearing loss is common. Death, typically caused by cardiorespiratory failure, usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decades to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities can be present. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. Hearing loss and cardiac valvular disease are common.
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to failure to thrive in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
FG syndrome
MedGen UID:
113106
Concept ID:
C0220769
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of MED12-related disorders, which is still being defined, includes at a minimum the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1) and Lujan syndrome (LS). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, high nasal root, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected.
Neu-Laxova syndrome
MedGen UID:
78537
Concept ID:
C0265218
Congenital Abnormality
Marshall syndrome
MedGen UID:
82694
Concept ID:
C0265235
Congenital Abnormality
Stickler syndrome is a group of hereditary conditions characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, eye abnormalities, hearing loss, and joint problems. These signs and symptoms vary widely among affected individuals. A characteristic feature of Stickler syndrome is a somewhat flattened facial appearance. This is caused by underdeveloped bones in the middle of the face, including the cheekbones and the bridge of the nose. A particular group of physical features, called Pierre Robin sequence, is also common in people with Stickler syndrome. Robin sequence includes an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate), a tongue that is placed further back than normal (glossoptosis), and a small lower jaw (micrognathia). This combination of features can lead to feeding problems and difficulty breathing. Many people with Stickler syndrome have severe nearsightedness (high myopia). In some cases, the clear gel that fills the eyeball (the vitreous) has an abnormal appearance, which is visible upon eye examination. Other eye problems are also common, including increased pressure within the eye (glaucoma), clouding of the lens of the eyes (cataracts), and tearing of the lining of the eye (retinal detachment). These eye abnormalities can cause impaired vision or blindness in some cases. Another feature of Stickler syndrome is hearing loss. The degree of hearing loss varies among affected individuals and may become more severe over time. Most people with Stickler syndrome have skeletal abnormalities that affect the joints. The joints of affected children and young adults may be loose and very flexible (hypermobile), though joints become less flexible with age. Arthritis often appears early in life and may cause joint pain or stiffness. Problems with the bones of the spine (vertebrae) may also occur, including abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis or kyphosis) and flattened vertebrae (platyspondyly). These spinal abnormalities may cause back pain. Researchers have described several types of Stickler syndrome, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and their characteristic signs and symptoms. In particular, the eye abnormalities and severity of hearing loss differ among the types. Type I has the highest risk of retinal detachment. Type II also includes eye abnormalities, but type III does not (and is often called non-ocular Stickler syndrome). Types II and III are more likely than type I to have hearing loss. Types IV and V are very rare and have only been diagnosed in a few individuals. A similar condition called Marshall syndrome is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, eye abnormalities, hearing loss, and early-onset arthritis. Marshall syndrome can also include short stature, which is typically not seen in people with Stickler syndrome. Whether Marshall syndrome represents a variant of Stickler syndrome or a separate disorder is controversial.
Coffin-Lowry syndrome
MedGen UID:
75556
Concept ID:
C0265252
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is usually characterized by severe-to-profound intellectual disability in males; less severely impaired individuals have been reported. Intellect ranges from normal to profoundly impaired in heterozygous females. The facial appearance is characteristic in the affected, older male child or adult. The hands are short, soft, and fleshy, often with remarkably hyperextensible fingers that taper from wide (proximally) to narrow with small terminal phalanges and nails. Males are consistently below the third centile in height. Microcephaly is common. Cardiac abnormalities may be present and can contribute to premature death. Stimulus-induced drop attacks (SIDAs) in which unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli or excitement triggers a brief collapse but no loss of consciousness are present in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Typically SIDAs begin between mid-childhood and the teens. Progressive kyphoscoliosis is one of the most difficult aspects of long-term care. Life span may be reduced.
Geleophysic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
78549
Concept ID:
C0265287
Congenital Abnormality
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with geleophysic dysplasia 1.
Coffin-Siris syndrome
MedGen UID:
75565
Concept ID:
C0265338
Congenital Abnormality
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth digit, distinctive facial features, and moderate to severe developmental/cognitive delay. Expressive language is more severely affected than receptive language. On average, children with CSS learn to sit at 12 months, walk at 30 months, and speak their first words at 24 months. Other findings commonly include failure to thrive, feeding difficulties, short stature, ophthalmologic abnormalities, microcephaly, brain malformations, and hearing loss.
Leprechaunism syndrome
MedGen UID:
82708
Concept ID:
C0265344
Disease or Syndrome
Donohue syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's tissues and organs do not respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin normally helps regulate blood sugar levels by controlling how much sugar (in the form of glucose) is passed from the bloodstream into cells to be used as energy. Severe insulin resistance leads to problems with regulating blood sugar levels and affects the development and function of organs and tissues throughout the body. Severe insulin resistance underlies the varied signs and symptoms of Donohue syndrome. Individuals with Donohue syndrome are unusually small starting before birth, and affected infants experience failure to thrive, which means they do not grow and gain weight at the expected rate. Additional features that become apparent soon after birth include a lack of fatty tissue under the skin (subcutaneous fat); wasting (atrophy) of muscles; excessive body hair growth (hirsutism); multiple cysts on the ovaries in females; and enlargement of the nipples, genitalia, kidneys, heart, and other organs. Most affected individuals also have a skin condition called acanthosis nigricans, in which the skin in body folds and creases becomes thick, dark, and velvety. Distinctive facial features in people with Donohue syndrome include bulging eyes, thick lips, upturned nostrils, and low-set ears. Affected individuals develop recurrent, life-threatening infections beginning in infancy. Donohue syndrome is one of a group of related conditions described as inherited severe insulin resistance syndromes. These disorders, which also include Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome and type A insulin resistance syndrome, are considered part of a spectrum. Donohue syndrome represents the most severe end of the spectrum; children with this condition do not survive beyond age 2.
Mandibular prognathism
MedGen UID:
120568
Concept ID:
C0266075
Congenital Abnormality
Mandibular prognathism is a dentofacial anomaly characterized by protrusion of the mandible, with lower incisors often overlapping the upper incisors. The protruding lower jaw is caused by a forward positioning of the mandible itself (summary by Stiles and Luke, 1953).
Cheilitis glandularis
MedGen UID:
75626
Concept ID:
C0267034
Disease or Syndrome
Idiopathic hypercalcemia of infancy
MedGen UID:
120608
Concept ID:
C0268080
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypercalcemia is characterized by severe hypercalcemia, failure to thrive, vomiting, dehydration, and nephrocalcinosis. An epidemic of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia occurred in the United Kingdom in the 1950s after the implementation of an increased prophylactic dose of vitamin D supplementation; however, the fact that most infants receiving the prophylaxis remained unaffected suggested that an intrinsic hypersensitivity to vitamin D might be implicated in the pathogenesis (summary by Schlingmann et al., 2011).
Aspartylglycosaminuria
MedGen UID:
78649
Concept ID:
C0268225
Disease or Syndrome
Aspartylglucosaminuria is a severe autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that involves the central nervous system and causes skeletal abnormalities as well as connective tissue lesions. The most characteristic feature is progressive mental retardation. The disorder is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glycosylasparaginase, which results in body fluid and tissue accumulation of a series of glycoasparagines, i.e., glycoconjugates with an aspartylglucosamine moiety at the reducing end. AGU belongs to the group of disorders commonly referred to as the Finnish disease heritage (summary by Mononen et al., 1993 and Arvio and Arvio, 2002).
Sialidosis, type II
MedGen UID:
120621
Concept ID:
C0268226
Disease or Syndrome
Sialidosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive lysosomal storage of sialylated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides caused by a deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase. Common to the sialidoses is the accumulation and/or excretion of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) covalently linked ('bound') to a variety of oligosaccharides and/or glycoproteins (summary by Lowden and O'Brien, 1979). The sialidoses are distinct from the sialurias in which there is storage and excretion of 'free' sialic acid, rather than 'bound' sialic acid; neuraminidase activity in sialuria is normal or elevated. Salla disease (604369) is a form of 'free' sialic acid disease. Classification Lowden and O'Brien (1979) provided a logical nosology of neuraminidase deficiency into sialidosis type I and type II. Type I is the milder form, also known as the 'normosomatic' type or the cherry red spot-myoclonus syndrome. Sialidosis type II is the more severe form with an earlier onset, and is also known as the 'dysmorphic' type. Type II has been subdivided into juvenile and infantile forms. Other terms for sialidosis type II are mucolipidosis I and lipomucopolysaccharidosis.
Odontotrichomelic syndrome
MedGen UID:
98034
Concept ID:
C0406723
Congenital Abnormality
The GAPO syndrome is the acronymic designation for a complex of growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia (failure of tooth eruption), and progressive optic atrophy (Tipton and Gorlin, 1984). Ilker et al. (1999) noted that optic atrophy is not a consistent feature of this disorder.
Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis
MedGen UID:
96590
Concept ID:
C0432268
Disease or Syndrome
Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis is an X-linked dominant sclerosing bone dysplasia that presents in females with macrocephaly, cleft palate, mild learning disabilities, sclerosis of the long bones and skull, and longitudinal striations visible on radiographs of the long bones, pelvis, and scapulae (Jenkins et al., 2009). In males, the disorder is usually associated with fetal or neonatal lethality. Occasional surviving males have, in addition to hyperostosis, cardiac, intestinal, and genitourinary malformations. Osteosclerosis in the cranial and facial bones leads to disfigurement and to disability due to pressure on cranial nerves, e.g., deafness. Osteopathia striata is a frequent feature of focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH; 305600). Although early reports of familial cases of this disorder appeared to suggest autosomal dominant inheritance (see, e.g., Horan and Beighton, 1978 and Konig et al., 1996), reappraisal of the literature (Behninger and Rott, 2000; Rott et al., 2003) and the finding of a molecular basis for the disorder by Jenkins et al. (2009) confirms that the inheritance pattern is X-linked dominant. Affected males who survive have a more severe phenotype than affected females, and sporadic male cases may result from somatic mosaicism (Behninger and Rott, 2000).
Lenz-Majewski hyperostosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
98483
Concept ID:
C0432269
Disease or Syndrome
Lenz-Majewski hyperostotic dwarfism is a rare condition characterized by intellectual disability, sclerosing bone dysplasia, distinct craniofacial and dental anomalies, loose skin, and distal limb anomalies, particularly brachydactyly and symphalangism. Patients have multiple radiographic abnormalities due to progressive generalized hyperostosis that affects the cranium, vertebrae, and diaphyses of tubular bones, leading to severe growth retardation (summary by Sousa et al., 2014).
Costello syndrome
MedGen UID:
108454
Concept ID:
C0587248
Disease or Syndrome
Costello syndrome is characterized by failure to thrive in infancy as a result of severe postnatal feeding difficulties; short stature; developmental delay or intellectual disability; coarse facial features (full lips, large mouth, full nasal tip); curly or sparse, fine hair; loose, soft skin with deep palmar and plantar creases; papillomata of the face and perianal region; diffuse hypotonia and joint laxity with ulnar deviation of the wrists and fingers; tight Achilles tendons; and cardiac involvement including: cardiac hypertrophy (usually typical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [HCM]), congenital heart defect (usually valvar pulmonic stenosis), and arrhythmia (usually supraventricular tachycardia, especially chaotic atrial rhythm/multifocal atrial tachycardia or ectopic atrial tachycardia). Relative or absolute macrocephaly is typical, and postnatal cerebellar overgrowth can result in the development of a Chiari I malformation with associated anomalies including hydrocephalus or syringomyelia. Individuals with Costello syndrome have an approximately 15% lifetime risk for malignant tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma in young children and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in adolescents and young adults.
Recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome
MedGen UID:
167070
Concept ID:
C0795822
Disease or Syndrome
Recombinant 8 syndrome is a condition that involves heart and urinary tract abnormalities, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and a distinctive facial appearance. The characteristic facial features include a wide, square face; a thin upper lip; a downturned mouth; a small chin (micrognathia); wide-set eyes (hypertelorism); and low-set or unusually shaped ears. People with recombinant 8 syndrome may have overgrowth of the gums (gingival hyperplasia) and abnormal tooth development. Males with this condition frequently have undescended testes (cryptorchidism). Some affected individuals have recurrent ear infections (otitis media) or hearing loss. Many children with recombinant 8 syndrome do not survive past early childhood, usually due to complications related to their heart abnormalities.
Hypertrichotic osteochondrodysplasia
MedGen UID:
208647
Concept ID:
C0795905
Disease or Syndrome
Cantú syndrome and the related disorders acromegaloid facial appearance (AFA) and hypertrichosis and acromegaloid facial features (HAFF) are characterized by congenital hypertrichosis; distinctive coarse facial features (including broad nasal bridge, wide mouth with full lips and macroglossia); enlarged heart (increased ventricular mass, enlarged chambers, and normal cardiac function); and skeletal abnormalities (thickening of the calvaria, broad ribs, scoliosis, and flaring of the metaphyses). Other cardiovascular abnormalities may include patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (in 50%), pericardial effusion (20%), and increased vascular tortuosity. Intellect is typically normal; behavioral problems can include anxiety, mood swings, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and tics.
Fountain syndrome
MedGen UID:
208650
Concept ID:
C0795944
Disease or Syndrome
Coarse facies, mental retardation, hearing loss, and skeletal abnormalities are the major symptoms.
Mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome X-linked, 1
MedGen UID:
167093
Concept ID:
C0796003
Disease or Syndrome
The term 'X-linked mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome' comprises several syndromes previously reported separately. These include Juberg-Marsidi, Carpenter-Waziri, Holmes-Gang, and Smith-Fineman-Myers syndromes as well as 1 family with X-linked mental retardation with spastic paraplegia. All these syndromes were found to be caused by mutation in the XH2 gene and are characterized primarily by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, and a highly skewed X-inactivation pattern in carrier women (Abidi et al., 2005). Other more variable features include hypogonadism, deafness, renal anomalies, and mild skeletal defects. X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X; 301040) is an allelic disorder with a similar phenotype with the addition of alpha-thalassemia and Hb H inclusion bodies in erythrocytes.
Laband syndrome
MedGen UID:
208656
Concept ID:
C0796013
Disease or Syndrome
Zimmermann-Laband syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by gingival fibromatosis, dysplastic or absent nails, hypoplasia of the distal phalanges, scoliosis, hepatosplenomegaly, hirsutism, and abnormalities of the cartilage of the nose and/or ears (summary by Balasubramanian and Parker, 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Zimmermann-Laband Syndrome Zimmermann-Laband syndrome-2 (ZLS2; 616455) is caused by mutation in the ATP6V1B2 gene (606939) on chromosome 8p21.
Primrose syndrome
MedGen UID:
162911
Concept ID:
C0796121
Disease or Syndrome
Primrose syndrome consists of recognizable facial features, macrocephaly, mental retardation, enlarged and calcified external ears, sparse body hair, and distal muscle wasting (summary by Carvalho and Speck-Martins, 2011). Patients with a deletion syndrome involving 3q13.31 (615433) exhibit features overlapping those of Primrose syndrome.
Snyder Robinson syndrome
MedGen UID:
162918
Concept ID:
C0796160
Disease or Syndrome
Snyder-Robinson syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome characterized by asthenic build, facial dysmorphism with a prominent lower lip, kyphoscoliosis, osteoporosis, and speech abnormalities. Developmental delay usually presents as failure to meet early developmental milestones and then evolves to moderate to profound global intellectual disability (which appears to remain stable over time) and variable motor disability. Asthenic habitus and low muscle mass usually develop during the first year, even in males who are ambulatory. During the first decade, males with SRS develop osteoporosis, resulting in fractures in the absence of trauma.
Atkin syndrome
MedGen UID:
163230
Concept ID:
C0796206
Disease or Syndrome
Acromegaloid facial appearance syndrome
MedGen UID:
167116
Concept ID:
C0796280
Disease or Syndrome
Coarse (acromegaloid) facies with thick lips, overgrowth of the intraoral mucosa, blepharophimosis, and bulbous nose in association with dull mentality and other disorders.
Sponastrime dysplasia
MedGen UID:
266247
Concept ID:
C1300260
Disease or Syndrome
Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome
MedGen UID:
220983
Concept ID:
C1303073
Disease or Syndrome
Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS) is characterized by severe mental retardation, early-onset seizures, short stature, dysmorphic facial features, and sparse hair (summary by Sousa et al., 2009).
Myelodysplasia, immunodeficiency, facial dysmorphism, short stature, and psychomotor delay
MedGen UID:
318627
Concept ID:
C1832442
Disease or Syndrome
MOMO syndrome
MedGen UID:
371897
Concept ID:
C1834759
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation
MedGen UID:
320559
Concept ID:
C1835265
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation is an autosomal dominant disorder that involves an overlapping but variable spectrum of central nervous system and ocular developmental anomalies. Microcephaly ranges from mild to severe and is often associated with mild to moderate developmental delay and a characteristic facial phenotype with upslanting palpebral fissures, broad nose with rounded tip, long philtrum with thin upper lip, prominent chin, and prominent ears. Chorioretinopathy is the most common eye abnormality, but retinal folds, microphthalmia, and myopic and hypermetropic astigmatism have also been reported, and some individuals have no overt ocular phenotype. Congenital lymphedema, when present, is typically confined to the dorsa of the feet, and lymphoscintigraphy reveals the absence of radioactive isotope uptake from the webspaces between the toes (summary by Ostergaard et al., 2012). Robitaille et al. (2014) found that MCLMR includes a broader spectrum of ocular disease, including retinal detachment with avascularity of the peripheral retina, and noted phenotypic overlap with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR; see EVR1, 133780). An autosomal recessive form of microcephaly with chorioretinopathy (251270) is caused by mutation in the TUBGCP6 gene (610053) on chromosome 22q. See also Mirhosseini-Holmes-Walton syndrome (autosomal recessive microcephaly with pigmentary retinopathy and mental retardation; 268050), which has been mapped to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1. A patient with microcephaly, congenital retinal fold, mental retardation, and lymphedema who had a pericentric inversion of chromosome 6 resulting in haploinsufficiency of the CDK19 gene (614720) has been reported.
Kanzaki disease
MedGen UID:
324539
Concept ID:
C1836522
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NAGA) deficiency is a very rare lysosomal storage disorder with atypical features. It is clinically heterogeneous with 3 main phenotypes: type I is an infantile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (609241); type II, also known as Kanzaki disease, is an adult-onset disorder characterized by angiokeratoma corporis diffusum and mild intellectual impairment; and type III is an intermediate disorder (see 609241) with mild to moderate neurologic manifestations (Desnick and Schindler, 2001).
Midface hypoplasia, obesity, developmental delay, and neonatal hypotonia
MedGen UID:
325238
Concept ID:
C1837730
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with characteristic facies
MedGen UID:
325071
Concept ID:
C1838653
Disease or Syndrome
Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 2
MedGen UID:
326463
Concept ID:
C1839333
Disease or Syndrome
EIEE2 is an X-linked dominant severe neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the first months of life and severe global developmental delay resulting in mental retardation and poor motor control. Other features include lack of speech development, subtle dysmorphic facial features, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal problems, and stereotypic hand movements. There is some phenotypic overlap with Rett syndrome (312750), but EIEE2 is considered to be a distinct entity (summary by Fehr et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIEE, see EIEE1 (308350).
Mental retardation, X-linked, syndromic 12
MedGen UID:
333405
Concept ID:
C1839792
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation and psoriasis
MedGen UID:
333408
Concept ID:
C1839801
Disease or Syndrome
Craniofacial abnormalities, cataracts, congenital heart disease, sacral neural tube defects, and growth and developmental retardation
MedGen UID:
330832
Concept ID:
C1842363
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair
MedGen UID:
334697
Concept ID:
C1843181
Disease or Syndrome
ATR-X syndrome
MedGen UID:
337145
Concept ID:
C1845055
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability (ATRX) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, genital anomalies, severe developmental delays, hypotonia, intellectual disability, and mild-to-moderate anemia secondary to alpha-thalassemia. Craniofacial abnormalities include small head circumference, telecanthus or widely spaced eyes, short nose, tented vermilion of the upper lip, and thick or everted vermilion of the lower lip with coarsening of the facial features over time. Although all affected individuals have a normal 46,XY karyotype, genital anomalies range from hypospadias and undescended testicles to severe hypospadias and ambiguous genitalia, to normal-appearing female external genitalia. Global developmental delays are evident in infancy and some affected individuals never walk independently or develop significant speech.
Martin-Probst deafness-mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
375620
Concept ID:
C1845285
Disease or Syndrome
Syndromic X-linked mental retardation, Cabezas type
MedGen UID:
337334
Concept ID:
C1845861
Disease or Syndrome
This form of syndromic X-linked mental retardation is characterized primarily by short stature, hypogonadism, and abnormal gait, with other more variable features such as speech delay, prominent lower lip, and tremor (Cabezas et al., 2000).
Mental retardation X-linked syndromic 11
MedGen UID:
335348
Concept ID:
C1846145
Disease or Syndrome
Amme complex
MedGen UID:
337424
Concept ID:
C1846242
Disease or Syndrome
Mental retardation, epileptic seizures, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity
MedGen UID:
375855
Concept ID:
C1846278
Disease or Syndrome
Zunich neuroectodermal syndrome
MedGen UID:
341214
Concept ID:
C1848392
Disease or Syndrome
Zunich neuroectodermal syndrome is an extremely rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder clinically characterized by colobomas, congenital heart defects, migratory ichthyosiform dermatosis, mental retardation, and ear anomalies (CHIME). Other clinical features include distinctive facial features, abnormal growth, genitourinary abnormalities, seizures, and feeding difficulties (summary by Ng et al., 2012).
Mental retardation Wolff type
MedGen UID:
336345
Concept ID:
C1848439
Disease or Syndrome
Three M syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
336440
Concept ID:
C1848862
Disease or Syndrome
3-M syndrome is characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation (final height 5-6 SD below the mean; i.e., 120-130 cm), characteristic facies, and normal intelligence. Additional features of 3-M syndrome include short broad neck, prominent trapezii, deformed sternum, short thorax, square shoulders, winged scapulae, hyperlordosis, short fifth fingers, prominent heels, and loose joints. Males with 3-M syndrome have hypogonadism and, occasionally, hypospadias.
Spinocerebellar ataxia with dysmorphism
MedGen UID:
336495
Concept ID:
C1849088
Disease or Syndrome
Nakajo syndrome
MedGen UID:
376827
Concept ID:
C1850568
Disease or Syndrome
This autosomal recessive systemic autoinflammatory disorder is characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions.
Noonan syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
339908
Concept ID:
C1853120
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, characteristic facies, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one third of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability.
Mastocytosis cutaneous with short stature conductive hearing loss and microtia
MedGen UID:
383661
Concept ID:
C1855345
Disease or Syndrome
Hall Riggs mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
341089
Concept ID:
C1856198
Disease or Syndrome
Temtamy syndrome
MedGen UID:
347474
Concept ID:
C1857512
Disease or Syndrome
Temtamy syndrome is a mental retardation/multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by variable craniofacial dysmorphism, ocular coloboma, seizures, and brain abnormalities, including abnormalities of the corpus callosum and thalamus (summary by Akizu et al., 2013).
Borrone Di Rocco Crovato syndrome
MedGen UID:
395254
Concept ID:
C1859406
Disease or Syndrome
Blepharophimosis with ptosis, syndactyly, and short stature
MedGen UID:
347880
Concept ID:
C1859432
Disease or Syndrome
Ackerman syndrome
MedGen UID:
395426
Concept ID:
C1860167
Disease or Syndrome
Craniosynostosis, anal anomalies, and porokeratosis
MedGen UID:
351066
Concept ID:
C1864186
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia Genevieve type
MedGen UID:
355314
Concept ID:
C1864872
Disease or Syndrome
Char syndrome
MedGen UID:
358356
Concept ID:
C1868570
Disease or Syndrome
Char syndrome is characterized by the triad of typical facial features, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and aplasia or hypoplasia of the middle phalanges of the fifth fingers. Typical facial features are flat midface, flat nasal bridge and broad flat nasal tip, wide-set eyes, downslanting palpebral fissures, mild ptosis, short philtrum resulting in a triangular mouth, and thickened (patulous) everted lips.
Meier-Gorlin syndrome
MedGen UID:
401501
Concept ID:
C1868684
Congenital Abnormality
Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect. Some people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age). Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge. Abnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair. Additional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.
LEOPARD syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
370588
Concept ID:
C1969056
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) is a condition in which the cardinal features consist of lentigines, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, short stature, pectus deformity, and dysmorphic facial features, including widely spaced eyes and ptosis. Multiple lentigines present as dispersed flat, black-brown macules, mostly on the face, neck and upper part of the trunk with sparing of the mucosa. In general, lentigines do not appear until age four to five years but then increase to the thousands by puberty. Some individuals with NSML do not exhibit lentigines. Approximately 85% of affected individuals have heart defects, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) (typically appearing during infancy and sometimes progressive) and pulmonary valve stenosis. Postnatal growth retardation resulting in short stature occurs in fewer than 50% of affected persons, although most affected individuals have a height that is less than the 25(th) percentile for age. Sensorineural hearing deficits, present in approximately 20%, are poorly characterized. Intellectual disability, typically mild, is observed in approximately 30% of persons with NSML.
Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy
MedGen UID:
370203
Concept ID:
C1970203
Disease or Syndrome
Pitt-Hopkins syndrome
MedGen UID:
370910
Concept ID:
C1970431
Disease or Syndrome
Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by distinctive facial features which become more apparent with age (100%), developmental delay/intellectual disability (100%), and episodic hyperventilation and/or breath-holding while awake (55%-60%). Global developmental delays are significant and intellectual disability is moderate to severe: mean age of walking is four to six years; most affected individuals are nonverbal. Other common findings are behavioral issues, hand stereotypic movements, seizures (40%-50%), constipation, and severe myopia.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia-brachydactyly and distinctive speech
MedGen UID:
435975
Concept ID:
C2673649
Disease or Syndrome
Kahrizi syndrome
MedGen UID:
382543
Concept ID:
C2675185
Disease or Syndrome
Kahrizi syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, cataracts, coloboma, kyphosis, and coarse facial features (summary by Kahrizi et al., 2009). See also congenital disorder of glycosylation type Iq (CDG1Q; 612379), an allelic disorder with overlapping features.
Craniofaciofrontodigital syndrome
MedGen UID:
393947
Concept ID:
C2676032
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis
MedGen UID:
416526
Concept ID:
C2751321
Disease or Syndrome
Hadziselimovic syndrome
MedGen UID:
414129
Concept ID:
C2751878
Disease or Syndrome
Clark-Baraitser syndrome
MedGen UID:
443983
Concept ID:
C2931130
Disease or Syndrome
15q24 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462024
Concept ID:
C3150674
Disease or Syndrome
The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay; mild to severe (usually at least moderate) intellectual disability; facial dysmorphisms; congenital malformations of the hands and feet, eye, and genitalia; joint laxity; and growth retardation and failure to thrive. Less common findings include: seizures; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hypospadias and/ or micropenis. Males and females are affected equally.
Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
462463
Concept ID:
C3151113
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect. Some people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age). Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge. Abnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair. Additional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.
Meier-Gorlin syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
462470
Concept ID:
C3151120
Disease or Syndrome
Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect. Some people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age). Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge. Abnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair. Additional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.
Microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and cardiac conduction defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
482322
Concept ID:
C3280692
Disease or Syndrome
The Zaki-Gleeson syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by profound mental retardation, severe microcephaly, poor growth, cerebellar hypoplasia, and second-degree cardiac conduction defects (summary by Zaki et al., 2011).
Mental retardation, autosomal dominant 14
MedGen UID:
766161
Concept ID:
C3553247
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebellar ataxia, nonprogressive, with mental retardation
MedGen UID:
766575
Concept ID:
C3553661
Disease or Syndrome
Nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia with mental retardation is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mildly delayed psychomotor development, early onset of cerebellar ataxia, and intellectual disability later in childhood and adult life. Other features may include neonatal hypotonia, dysarthria, and dysmetria. Brain imaging in some patients shows cerebellar atrophy. Dysmorphic facial features are variable (summary by Thevenon et al., 2012).

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Boycott KM, Beaulieu C, Puffenberger EG, McLeod DR, Parboosingh JS, Innes AM
Am J Med Genet A 2010 Jun;152A(6):1349-56. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33379. PMID: 20503307

Diagnosis

Boycott KM, Beaulieu C, Puffenberger EG, McLeod DR, Parboosingh JS, Innes AM
Am J Med Genet A 2010 Jun;152A(6):1349-56. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33379. PMID: 20503307

Therapy

Hara M, Ishida R, Ohkubo M, Sugiyama T, Abe S
J Oral Rehabil 2014 May;41(5):374-80. Epub 2014 Mar 2 doi: 10.1111/joor.12154. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24579999

Prognosis

Boycott KM, Beaulieu C, Puffenberger EG, McLeod DR, Parboosingh JS, Innes AM
Am J Med Genet A 2010 Jun;152A(6):1349-56. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33379. PMID: 20503307

Clinical prediction guides

Hara M, Ishida R, Ohkubo M, Sugiyama T, Abe S
J Oral Rehabil 2014 May;41(5):374-80. Epub 2014 Mar 2 doi: 10.1111/joor.12154. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24579999
Boycott KM, Beaulieu C, Puffenberger EG, McLeod DR, Parboosingh JS, Innes AM
Am J Med Genet A 2010 Jun;152A(6):1349-56. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33379. PMID: 20503307

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Consumer resources

    Outreach and support

    Clinical Trials

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...