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1.

Susceptibility to severe cutaneous adverse reaction

MedGen UID:
326760
Concept ID:
C1840548
Finding
2.

Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is the most common process resulting in disproportionate small stature. Affected individuals have short arms and legs, a large head, and characteristic facial features with frontal bossing and midface retrusion (formerly known as midface hypoplasia). In infancy, hypotonia is typical, and acquisition of developmental motor milestones is often both aberrant in pattern and delayed. Intelligence and life span are usually near normal, although craniocervical junction compression increases the risk of death in infancy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1289
Concept ID:
C0001080
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Gaucher disease, type 1

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Williams syndrome

Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to failure to thrive in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Proteus syndrome

Proteus syndrome is characterized by progressive, segmental or patchy overgrowth of diverse tissues of all germ layers, most commonly affecting the skeleton, skin, and adipose and central nervous systems. In most individuals Proteus syndrome has minimal or no manifestations at birth, develops and progresses rapidly beginning in the toddler period, and relentlessly progresses through childhood, causing severe overgrowth and disfigurement. It is associated with a range of tumors, pulmonary complications, and a striking predisposition to deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
39008
Concept ID:
C0085261
Neoplastic Process
6.

Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 1, X-linked

Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of joint contractures that begin in early childhood, slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting initially in a humero-peroneal distribution that later extends to the scapular and pelvic girdle muscles, and cardiac involvement that may manifest as palpitations, presyncope and syncope, poor exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure. Age of onset, severity, and progression of muscle and cardiac involvement demonstrate both inter- and intrafamilial variability. Clinical variability ranges from early onset with severe presentation in childhood to late onset with slow progression in adulthood. In general, joint contractures appear during the first two decades, followed by muscle weakness and wasting. Cardiac involvement usually occurs after the second decade. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
148284
Concept ID:
C0751337
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Long QT syndrome 1

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7), hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8) and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
19831
Concept ID:
C0035828
Disease or Syndrome
8.

beta Thalassemia

Beta-thalassemia (ß-thalassemia) is characterized by reduced synthesis of the hemoglobin subunit beta (hemoglobin beta chain) that results in microcytic hypochromic anemia, an abnormal peripheral blood smear with nucleated red blood cells, and reduced amounts of hemoglobin A (HbA) on hemoglobin analysis. Individuals with thalassemia major have severe anemia and hepatosplenomegaly; they usually come to medical attention within the first two years of life. Without treatment, affected children have severe failure to thrive and shortened life expectancy. Treatment with a regular transfusion program and chelation therapy, aimed at reducing transfusion iron overload, allows for normal growth and development and may improve the overall prognosis. Individuals with thalassemia intermedia present later and have milder anemia that only rarely requires transfusion. These individuals are at risk for iron overload secondary to increased intestinal absorption of iron as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2611
Concept ID:
C0005283
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke

MELAS syndrome, comprising mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with a variable clinical phenotype. The disorder is accompanied by features of central nervous system involvement, including seizures, hemiparesis, hemianopsia, cortical blindness, and episodic vomiting (Pavlakis et al., 1984; Montagna et al., 1988). Other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies include Leigh syndrome (LS; 256000), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS; 530000), MERRF syndrome (545000), and Leber optic atrophy (535000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

Deficiency of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which catalyzes the initial step of mitochondrial ß-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids with a chain length of 14 to 20 carbons, is associated with three phenotypes. The severe early-onset cardiac and multi-organ failure form typically presents in the first months of life with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy, pericardial effusion, and arrhythmias, as well as hypotonia, hepatomegaly, and intermittent hypoglycemia. The hepatic or hypoketotic hypoglycemic form typically presents during early childhood with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, but without cardiomyopathy. The later-onset episodic myopathic form presents with intermittent rhabdomyolysis, muscle cramps and/or pain, and/or exercise intolerance. Hypoglycemia typically is not present at the time of symptoms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87459
Concept ID:
C0342784
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Long QT syndrome 2

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7), hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8) and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462293
Concept ID:
C3150943
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Benign scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy with cardiomyopathy

Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of joint contractures that begin in early childhood, slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting initially in a humero-peroneal distribution that later extends to the scapular and pelvic girdle muscles, and cardiac involvement that may manifest as palpitations, presyncope and syncope, poor exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure. Age of onset, severity, and progression of muscle and cardiac involvement demonstrate both inter- and intrafamilial variability. Clinical variability ranges from early onset with severe presentation in childhood to late onset with slow progression in adulthood. In general, joint contractures appear during the first two decades, followed by muscle weakness and wasting. Cardiac involvement usually occurs after the second decade. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98048
Concept ID:
C0410190
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Arterial tortuosity syndrome

Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is characterized by: Severe and widespread arterial tortuosity of the aorta and middle-sized arteries (with an increased risk of aneurysms and dissections) and focal and widespread stenosis which can involve the aorta and/or pulmonary arteries; ??The risk for ischemic vascular events involving cerebrovascular circulation and the abdominal arteries is increased. In addition, large veins may be dilated and valvular regurgitation and mitral valve prolapse can occur. Craniofacial involvement with characteristic facies and high palate with dental crowding; Soft/doughy skin and other evidence of a generalized connective tissue disorder including skeletal findings (scoliosis, pectus excavatum/carinatum, joint laxity, knee/elbow contractures, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly); inguinal/abdominal wall hernia; sliding hiatal or diaphragmatic hernia; hypotonia; and ocular involvement (myopia, keratoconus). [from NCBI]

MedGen UID:
347942
Concept ID:
C1859726
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1B

Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SEPN1-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
320400
Concept ID:
C1834653
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Danon disease

Danon disease is an X-linked dominant disorder predominantly affecting cardiac muscle. Skeletal muscle involvement and mental retardation are variable features. The accumulation of glycogen in muscle and lysosomes originally led to the classification of Danon disease as a variant of glycogen storage disease II (Pompe disease; 232300) with 'normal acid maltase' or alpha-glucosidase (GAA; 606800) (Danon et al., 1981). However, Nishino et al. (2000) stated that Danon disease is not a glycogen storage disease because glycogen is not always increased. Sugie et al. (2005) classified Danon disease as a form of autophagic vacuolar myopathy, characterized by intracytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles with sarcolemmal features. The characteristic vacuole is believed to be an autolysosome surrounded by secondarily-generated membranes containing sarcolemmal proteins, basal lamina, and acetylcholinesterase activity. X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA; 310440) is a distinct disorder with similar pathologic features. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
209235
Concept ID:
C0878677
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Long qt syndrome 3

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7), hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8) and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349087
Concept ID:
C1859062
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 1

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle; with time, it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349530
Concept ID:
C1862511
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Clinical manifestations usually occur in an individual with a concurrent febrile or gastrointestinal illness when energy demands are increased; onset of symptoms is usually rapid. The recognized phenotypes are: acute fatty liver of pregnancy, in which the fetus has biallelic pathogenic variants in CPT1A that causes CPT1A deficiency; and hepatic encephalopathy, in which individuals (typically children) present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and sudden onset of liver failure. Individuals with hepatic encephalopathy typically present with hypoglycemia, absent or low levels of ketones, and elevated serum concentrations of liver transaminases, ammonia, and total carnitine. Between episodes of hepatic encephalopathy, individuals appear developmentally and cognitively normal unless previous metabolic decompensation has resulted in neurologic damage. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87461
Concept ID:
C0342789
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Alexander disease

Alexander disease is a progressive disorder of cerebral white matter that predominantly affects infants and children and has variable life expectancy. The later-onset forms present with a slower clinical course. The infantile form comprises about 42% of affected individuals, the juvenile form about 22%, and the adult form about 33%. A neonatal form is also recognized. The neonatal form leads to severe disability or death within two years. Characteristics include seizures, hydrocephalus, severe motor and intellectual disability, and elevated CSF protein concentration. MRI shows severe white matter abnormalities with involvement of the basal ganglia and cerebellum. The infantile form presents in the first two years of life, typically with progressive psychomotor retardation with loss of developmental milestones, megalencephaly, frontal bossing, and seizures. Other findings include hyperreflexia and pyramidal signs, ataxia, and occasional hydrocephalus secondary to aqueductal stenosis. Affected children survive weeks to several years. The juvenile form usually presents between ages four and ten years, occasionally in the mid-teens. Findings can include bulbar/pseudobulbar signs, ataxia, gradual loss of intellectual function, seizures, normocephaly or megalencephaly, and breathing problems. Survival ranges from the early teens to the 20s-30s. The adult form is the most variable. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78724
Concept ID:
C0270726
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Long QT syndrome 5

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7), hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8) and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
358092
Concept ID:
C1867904
Disease or Syndrome
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