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1.

Ganglioside sialidase deficiency

Mucolipidosis IV is characterized by severe psychomotor delay evident by the end of the first year of life and slowly progressive visual impairment during the first decade as a result of a combination of corneal clouding and retinal degeneration. By the end of the first decade of life and certainly by their early teens, all individuals with typical mucolipidosis IV have severe visual impairment as a result of retinal degeneration. Neurodegeneration is thought to occur in no more than 15% of individuals. About 5% of individuals have atypical mucolipidosis IV, often manifest as less severe psychomotor retardation and/or eye findings. Although in the past, mucolipidosis IV was considered an Ashkenazi Jewish disease, currently most affected individuals are non-Ashkenazi Jewish. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
68663
Concept ID:
C0238286
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Metachromatic leukodystrophy

Arylsulfatase A deficiency (also known as metachromatic leukodystrophy or MLD) is characterized by three clinical subtypes: late-infantile MLD (50%-60% of cases); juvenile MLD (20%-30% of cases); and adult MLD (15%-20% of cases). Age of onset within a family is usually similar. The disease course may be from three to ten or more years in the late-infantile form and up to 20 years or more in the juvenile and adult forms. Late-infantile MLD. Onset is between ages one and two years. Typical presenting findings include weakness, hypotonia, clumsiness, frequent falls, toe walking, and slurred speech. Later signs include inability to stand, difficulty with speech, deterioration of mental function, increased muscle tone, pain in the arms and legs, generalized or partial seizures, compromised vision and hearing, and peripheral neuropathy. In the final stages children have tonic spasms, decerebrate posturing, and general unawareness of their surroundings. Juvenile MLD. Onset is between age four years and sexual maturity (age 12-14 years). Initial manifestations include decline in school performance and emergence of behavioral problems, followed by clumsiness, gait problems, slurred speech, incontinence, and bizarre behaviors. Seizures may occur. Progression is similar to but slower than the late-infantile form. Adult MLD. Onset occurs after sexual maturity, sometimes not until the fourth or fifth decade. Initial signs can include problems in school or job performance, personality changes, alcohol or drug abuse, poor money management, and emotional lability; in others, neurologic symptoms (weakness and loss of coordination progressing to spasticity and incontinence) or seizures predominate initially. Peripheral neuropathy is common. Disease course is variable, with periods of stability interspersed with periods of decline, and may extend over two to three decades. The final stage is similar to that for the earlier-onset forms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6071
Concept ID:
C0023522
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Microphthalmia syndromic 3

SOX2-related eye disorders are characterized by anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia that is usually bilateral, severe, and apparent at birth or by prenatal ultrasound examination. Other common findings include brain malformations, esophageal atresia, cryptorchidism and/or micropenis in males, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and/or pituitary hypoplasia. Postnatal growth failure, delayed motor development, and learning disability are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
347232
Concept ID:
C1859773
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) comprises a continuum of three phenotypes with overlapping clinical and radiologic features: Classic infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). Atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy (atypical NAD). PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism. INAD usually begins between ages six months and three years with developmental regression, hypotonia, progressive psychomotor delay, and progressive spastic tetraparesis. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Disease progression is rapid. Many affected children never learn to walk or lose the ability shortly after attaining it. Severe spasticity, progressive cognitive decline, and visual impairment typically result in death during the first decade. Atypical NAD shows more phenotypic variability than INAD. In general, onset is in early childhood but can be as late as the end of the second decade. The presenting signs may be gait instability or ataxia (as in the classic form) or speech delay and autistic features, which are sometimes the only evidence of disease for a year or more. The course is fairly stable during early childhood and resembles static encephalopathy but is followed by neurologic deterioration between ages seven and 12 years. PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism presents with subacute onset of dystonia-parkinsonism in late adolescence/early adulthood. Other findings are eye movement abnormalities, pyramidal tract signs, and marked cognitive decline. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82852
Concept ID:
C0270724
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Fucosidosis

Fucosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by defective alpha-L-fucosidase with accumulation of fucose in the tissues. Clinical features include angiokeratoma, progressive psychomotor retardation, neurologic signs, coarse facial features, and dysostosis multiplex. Fucosidosis has been classified into 2 major types. Type 1 is characterized by rapid psychomotor regression and severe neurologic deterioration beginning at about 6 months of age, elevated sweat sodium chloride, and death within the first decade of life. Type 2 is characterized by milder psychomotor retardation and neurologic signs, the development of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum, normal sweat salinity, and longer survival (Kousseff et al., 1976). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
5288
Concept ID:
C0016788
Disease or Syndrome
6.

3-Methylglutaconic aciduria

3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is an inherited condition that causes neurological problems. Beginning in infancy to early childhood, children with this condition often have delayed development of mental and motor skills (psychomotor delay), speech delay, involuntary muscle cramping (dystonia), and spasms and weakness of the arms and legs (spastic quadriparesis). Affected individuals can also have optic atrophy, which is the degeneration (atrophy) of nerve cells that carry visual information from the eyes to the brain.In some cases, signs and symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency begin in adulthood, often in a person's twenties or thirties. These individuals have damage to a type of brain tissue called white matter (leukoencephalopathy), which likely contributes to progressive problems with speech (dysarthria), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), stiffness (spasticity), optic atrophy, and a decline in intellectual function (dementia).Affected individuals who show symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency in childhood often go on to develop leukoencephalopathy and other neurological problems in adulthood.All people with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency accumulate large amounts of a substance called 3-methylglutaconic acid in their body fluids. As a result, they have elevated levels of acid in their blood (metabolic acidosis) and excrete large amounts of acid in their urine (aciduria). 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is one of a group of metabolic disorders that can be diagnosed by the presence of increased levels 3-methylglutaconic acid in urine (3-methylglutaconic aciduria). People with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency also have high urine levels of another acid called 3-methylglutaric acid.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
90994
Concept ID:
C0342727
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome

MCT8-specific thyroid hormone cell-membrane transporter deficiency is characterized by severe cognitive deficiency, infantile hypotonia, diminished muscle mass and generalized muscle weakness, progressive spastic quadriplegia, joint contractures, and dystonic and/or athetoid movement with characteristic paroxysms or kinesigenic dyskinesias. Seizures occur in about 25% of cases. Most affected males never sit or walk independently or lose these abilities over time; most never speak or have severely dysarthric speech. Brain MRI obtained in the first few years of life shows transient delayed myelination, which improves by age four years. Although psychomotor findings observed in affected males do not occur in heterozygous females, the latter often have thyroid test abnormalities intermediate between affected and normal individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
208645
Concept ID:
C0795889
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Lissencephaly 3

MedGen UID:
369910
Concept ID:
C1969029
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 4

MedGen UID:
436917
Concept ID:
C2677326
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 11

EIEE11 is an autosomal dominant seizure disorder characterized by infantile onset of refractory seizures with resultant delayed neurologic development and persistent neurologic abnormalities (Ogiwara et al., 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIEE, see EIEE1 (308350). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462337
Concept ID:
C3150987
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Proud Levine Carpenter syndrome

Proud syndrome is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, severe mental retardation, seizures, and spasticity. Males are severely affected, whereas females may be unaffected or have a milder phenotype (Proud et al., 1992). Proud syndrome is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from lissencephaly (LISX2; 300215) to Proud syndrome to infantile spasms without brain malformations (EIEE1; 308350) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
163217
Concept ID:
C0796124
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pyruvate dehydrogenase E3-binding protein deficiency

Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is characterized by the buildup of a chemical called lactic acid in the body and a variety of neurological problems. Signs and symptoms of this condition usually first appear shortly after birth, and they can vary widely among affected individuals. The most common feature is a potentially life-threatening buildup of lactic acid (lactic acidosis), which can cause nausea, vomiting, severe breathing problems, and an abnormal heartbeat. People with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency usually have neurological problems as well. Most have delayed development of mental abilities and motor skills such as sitting and walking. Other neurological problems can include intellectual disability, seizures, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), poor coordination, and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals have abnormal brain structures, such as underdevelopment of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (corpus callosum), wasting away (atrophy) of the exterior part of the brain known as the cerebral cortex, or patches of damaged tissue (lesions) on some parts of the brain. Because of the severe health effects, many individuals with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency do not survive past childhood, although some may live into adolescence or adulthood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
343383
Concept ID:
C1855553
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 5

MedGen UID:
462081
Concept ID:
C3150731
Disease or Syndrome
14.

GM1 gangliosidosis type 2

GM1-gangliosidosis type II is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by slowly progressive generalized neurodegeneration and mild skeletal changes, with onset between 7 months and 3 years of age. Unlike the severe infantile type I, type II is usually not associated with macular cherry-red spots or organomegaly. Within type II, those with somewhat earlier onset and earlier death are considered to have the 'late-infantile' form, whereas those with slightly later onset and survival into late childhood are referred to as having the 'juvenile' form (Caciotti et al., 2003). However, there is no strict age marker to distinguish between these 2 type II forms. GLB1 enzyme activity in type II ranges from approximately 1 to 4% of control values (Nishimoto et al., 1991; Yoshida et al., 1991). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120625
Concept ID:
C0268272
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Molybdenum cofactor deficiency, complementation group A

Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is a rare condition characterized by brain dysfunction (encephalopathy) that worsens over time. Babies with this condition appear normal at birth, but within a week they have difficulty feeding and develop seizures that do not improve with treatment (intractable seizures). Brain abnormalities, including deterioration (atrophy) of brain tissue, lead to severe developmental delay; affected individuals usually do not learn to sit unassisted or to speak. A small percentage of affected individuals have an exaggerated startle reaction (hyperekplexia) to unexpected stimuli such as loud noises. Other features of molybdenum cofactor deficiency can include a small head size (microcephaly) and facial features that are described as "coarse."Tests reveal that affected individuals have high levels of chemicals called sulfite, S-sulfocysteine, xanthine, and hypoxanthine in the urine and low levels of a chemical called uric acid in the blood.Because of the serious health problems caused by molybdenum cofactor deficiency, affected individuals usually do not survive past early childhood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
381530
Concept ID:
C1854988
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Combined molybdoflavoprotein enzyme deficiency

Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MOCOD) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by onset in infancy of poor feeding, intractable seizures, and severe psychomotor retardation. Characteristic biochemical abnormalities include decreased serum uric acid and increased urine sulfite levels due to the combined enzymatic deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH; 607633) and sulfite oxidase (SUOX; 606887), both of which use molybdenum as a cofactor. Most affected individuals die in early childhood (summary by Reiss, 2000; Reiss et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Molybdenum Cofactor Deficiency See also MOCOD, complementation group B (MOCODB; 252160), caused by mutation in the MOCS2 gene (602708) on chromosome 5q11; and MOCOD, complementation group C (MOCODC; 615501), caused by mutation in the GPHN gene (603930) on chromosome 14q24. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75652
Concept ID:
C0268119
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Encephalopathy, acute, infection-induced, 3, suceptibility to

Infection-induced acute encephalopathy 3 (IIAE3) is the susceptibility to recurrent acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) caused by a heterozygous pathogenic variant in RANBP2. ANE refers to the specific neurologic presentation in which bilateral symmetric thalamic, midbrain, and/or hindbrain lesions occur within days following the onset of an acute viral illness caused by influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza II, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackie virus, or an enterovirus. Although most IIAE3 occurs before age six years, first episodes have been observed in teenagers and adults. ANE begins within 12 hours to three or four days of the first awareness of viral symptoms (fever, cough, rhinorrhea, vomiting, diarrhea, and malaise). The most common sign of ANE is lethargy that progresses to coma (which may last for weeks) and seizures (in 50%). One third of affected individuals die during the acute phase of the encephalopathy; of the survivors, one half have permanent neurologic damage and the remainder have no discernible residual symptoms. Fifty per cent of persons with IIAE3 will have at least one repeat episode and some will have multiple repeat episodes [from NCBI]

MedGen UID:
382634
Concept ID:
C2675556
Finding
18.

Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease

PCWH syndrome is a complex neurocristopathy that includes features of 4 distinct syndromes: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy (see 118200), central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (see 142623) (Inoue et al., 2004). Inoue et al. (2004) proposed the acronym PCWH for this disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
373160
Concept ID:
C1836727
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

ALS2-related disorders involve retrograde degeneration of the upper motor neurons of the pyramidal tracts and comprise a clinical continuum from infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia (IAHSP), to juvenile forms without lower motor neuron involvement (juvenile primary lateral sclerosis [JPLS]), to forms with lower motor neuron involvement (autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [JALS]). IAHSP is characterized by onset of spasticity with increased reflexes and sustained clonus of the lower limbs within the first two years of life, progressive weakness and spasticity of the upper limbs by age seven to eight years, and wheelchair dependence in the second decade with progression toward severe spastic tetraparesis and a pseudobulbar syndrome. JPLS is characterized by onset and loss of ability to walk during the second year of life, progressive signs of upper motor neuron disease, wheelchair dependence by adolescence, and later loss of motor speech production. JALS is characterized by onset during childhood (mean age of onset 6.5 years), spasticity of facial muscles, uncontrolled laughter, spastic dysarthria, spastic gait, moderate muscle atrophy (variably present), bladder dysfunction, and sensory disturbances; some individuals are bedridden by age 12 to 50 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
335467
Concept ID:
C1846588
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Cerebral palsy, spastic quadriplegic, 1

Cerebral palsy (CP) is defined as a nonprogressive but not unchanging disorder of posture or movement, caused by an abnormality of the brain and first evident at the stage of rapid brain development (Hughes and Newton, 1992). The most common forms result from factors surrounding difficulties before or at birth, such as severe perinatal asphyxia, congenital infection, prematurity, and multiple pregnancy (Blair and Stanley, 1988; Stanley, 1994). More rarely, familial clustering or absence of pre- or postpartum events indicate that there are genetic forms of the disorder (Lynex et al., 2004). Cerebral palsy can be classified according to the type of movement disorder: spastic cerebral palsy accounts for approximately 60% of cases and can be subdivided into hemiplegic, diplegic, quadriplegic, and monoplegic types, whereas other forms include athetoid/dyskinetic, ataxic (605388), and mixed (Gustavson et al., 1969). Genetic Heterogeneity of Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy See also CPSQ2 (612900), caused by deletion of the ANKRD15 gene (KANK1; 607704) inherited on the paternal allele, and CPSQ3 (617008), caused by mutation in the ADD3 gene (601568) on 10q24. Related phenotypes that were formerly classified in the CPSQ series include spastic paraplegia-47 (SPG47; 614066), spastic paraplegia-50 (SPG50; 612936), spastic paraplegia-51 (SPG51; 613744), and spastic paraplegia-52 (614067). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
442852
Concept ID:
C2751938
Disease or Syndrome
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