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1.

Muscle eye brain disease

Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SEPN1-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
105341
Concept ID:
C0457133
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

I cell disease

Mucolipidosis II (ML II, I-cell disease) is a slowly progressive inborn error of metabolism with clinical onset at birth and fatal outcome most often in early childhood. Postnatal growth is limited and often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Already in infancy skeletal radiographs reveal dysostosis multiplex. All children appear to have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
3.

MECP2 duplication syndrome

The MECP2 duplication syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, delayed psychomotor development leading to severe intellectual disability, poor speech development, progressive spasticity, recurrent respiratory infections (in ~75% of affected individuals) and seizures (in ~50%). MECP2 duplication syndrome is 100% penetrant in males. Occasionally females have been described with a MECP2 duplication and related clinical findings, often associated with concomitant X-chromosomal abnormalities that prevent inactivation of the duplicated region. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are most often observed; atonic seizures and absence seizures have also been described. One third of affected males are never able to walk independently. Almost 50% of affected males die before age 25 years, presumably from complications of recurrent infection and/or neurologic deterioration. In addition to the core features, autistic behaviors and gastrointestinal dysfunction have been observed in several affected boys. Although interfamilial phenotypic variability is observed, severity is usually consistent within families. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
337496
Concept ID:
C1846058
Disease or Syndrome; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome

MCT8-specific thyroid hormone cell-membrane transporter deficiency is characterized by severe cognitive deficiency, infantile hypotonia, diminished muscle mass and generalized muscle weakness, progressive spastic quadriplegia, joint contractures, and dystonic and/or athetoid movement with characteristic paroxysms or kinesigenic dyskinesias. Seizures occur in about 25% of cases. Most affected males never sit or walk independently or lose these abilities over time; most never speak or have severely dysarthric speech. Brain MRI obtained in the first few years of life shows transient delayed myelination, which improves by age four years. Although psychomotor findings observed in affected males do not occur in heterozygous females, the latter often have thyroid test abnormalities intermediate between affected and normal individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
208645
Concept ID:
C0795889
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Lissencephaly 2, X-linked

X-linked lissencephaly-2 (LISX2) is a developmental disorder characterized by structural brain anomalies, early-onset intractable seizures, severe psychomotor retardation, and ambiguous genitalia. Males are severely affected and often die within the first days or months of life, whereas females may be unaffected or have a milder phenotype (Bonneau et al., 2002). LISX2 is part of a phenotypic spectrum of disorders caused by mutation in the ARX gene comprising a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders ranging from hydranencephaly and lissencephaly to Proud syndrome (300004) to infantile spasms without brain malformations (EIEE1; 308350) to syndromic (309510) and nonsyndromic (300419) mental retardation (Kato et al., 2004; Wallerstein et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375832
Concept ID:
C1846171
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency

Adenylosuccinase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by an enzymatic defect in de novo purine synthesis (DNPS) pathway. ADSL deficiency leads to the accumulation of toxic intermediates, including succinyladenosine (S-Ado) and succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide riboside (SAICAr) in body fluids. There are 3 major phenotypic forms of the disorder that correlate with different values of the S-Ado and SAICAr concentration ratios (S-Ado/SAICAr) in the cerebrospinal fluid. These include the most severe fatal neonatal encephalopathy (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio less than 1); childhood form (type I) with severe psychomotor retardation (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio close to 1), and a milder form (type II) with psychomotor retardation or hypotonia (S-Ado/SAICAr ratio greater than 2) (summary by Baresova et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
78641
Concept ID:
C0268126
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Aicardi Goutieres syndrome 4

Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical handicap. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with mutation of the AGS-related genes is not yet known. For example, mutation of ADAR has recently been associated with a clinical presentation of acute bilateral striatal necrosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
332084
Concept ID:
C1835912
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 4

MedGen UID:
436917
Concept ID:
C2677326
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 4

TSEN54-related pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) includes three PCH types (PCH2, 4, and 5) that share characteristic neuroradiologic and neurologic findings. The three types (which differ mainly in life expectancy) were thought to be distinct entities before their molecular basis was known. Children with PCH2 usually succumb before age ten years, whereas those with PCH4 and 5 usually succumb as neonates. Children with PCH2 have generalized clonus, incoordination of sucking and swallowing, impaired motor and cognitive development with lack of voluntary motor development, central visual impairment, and an increased risk for rhabdomyolysis complicating severe infections. Epilepsy is present in approximately 50%. Neonates with PCH4 often have seizures, multiple joint contractures (''arthrogryposis''), generalized clonus, and central respiratory impairment. PCH5, which resembles PCH4, has been described in one family. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
384027
Concept ID:
C1856974
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Aicardi Goutieres syndrome 3

Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical handicap. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with mutation of the AGS-related genes is not yet known. For example, mutation of ADAR has recently been associated with a clinical presentation of acute bilateral striatal necrosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
324389
Concept ID:
C1835916
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2A

TSEN54-related pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) includes three PCH types (PCH2, 4, and 5) that share characteristic neuroradiologic and neurologic findings. The three types (which differ mainly in life expectancy) were thought to be distinct entities before their molecular basis was known. Children with PCH2 usually succumb before age ten years, whereas those with PCH4 and 5 usually succumb as neonates. Children with PCH2 have generalized clonus, incoordination of sucking and swallowing, impaired motor and cognitive development with lack of voluntary motor development, central visual impairment, and an increased risk for rhabdomyolysis complicating severe infections. Epilepsy is present in approximately 50%. Neonates with PCH4 often have seizures, multiple joint contractures (''arthrogryposis''), generalized clonus, and central respiratory impairment. PCH5, which resembles PCH4, has been described in one family. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
376379
Concept ID:
C1848526
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pseudoneonatal adrenoleukodystrophy

Peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. See also D-bifunctional protein deficiency (261515), caused by mutation in the HSD17B4 gene (601860) on chromosome 5q2. The clinical manifestations of these 2 deficiencies are similar to those of disorders of peroxisomal assembly, including Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome (see 214100) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (see 601539) (Watkins et al., 1995). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
376636
Concept ID:
C1849678
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1E

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are metabolic deficiencies in glycoprotein biosynthesis that usually cause severe mental and psychomotor retardation. Different forms of CDGs can be recognized by altered isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns of serum transferrin. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG Ia (212065) and CDG Ib (602579). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
324784
Concept ID:
C1837396
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 6A

Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 7 (CG7, equivalent to CGB) have mutations in the PEX10 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766861
Concept ID:
C3553947
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome

Mosaic variegated aneuploidy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mosaic aneuploidies, predominantly trisomies and monosomies, involving multiple different chromosomes and tissues (Hanks et al., 2004). The proportion of aneuploid cells varies but is usually more than 25% and is substantially greater than in normal individuals. Affected individuals typically present with severe intrauterine growth retardation and microcephaly. Eye anomalies, mild dysmorphism, variable developmental delay, and a broad spectrum of additional congenital abnormalities and medical conditions may also occur. The risk of malignancy is high, with rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms tumor, and leukemia reported in several cases. See also MVA2 (614114), caused by mutation in the CEP57 gene (607951) on chromosome 11q21. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
338026
Concept ID:
C1850343
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome

MedGen UID:
120527
Concept ID:
C0265286
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
17.

Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 10A

Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 12 (CG12, equivalent to CGG) have mutations in the PEX3 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766913
Concept ID:
C3553999
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8A

Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome resulting from disordered peroxisome biogenesis. Affected children present in the newborn period with profound hypotonia, seizures, and inability to feed. Characteristic craniofacial anomalies, eye abnormalities, neuronal migration defects, hepatomegaly, and chondrodysplasia punctata are present. Children with this condition do not show any significant development and usually die in the first year of life (summary by Steinberg et al., 2006). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Zellweger syndrome, see 214100. Individuals with PBDs of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD) have mutations in the PEX16 gene. For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766873
Concept ID:
C3553959
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

The microcephaly-capillary malformation (MIC-CAP) syndrome is characterized by microcephaly, generalized cutaneous capillary malformations (ranging from a few to hundreds of oval/circular macules or patches varying in size from 1-2 mm to several cm), hypoplastic distal phalanges of the hands and/or feet, intractable epilepsy, and profound developmental delay. Seizures, which can include focal, tonic, complex partial, and infantile spasms, seem to stabilize after the first two years of life. Myoclonus of the limbs and eyelids is common; other abnormal movements (dyskinetic, choreiform) may be seen. Minimal developmental progress is made after birth. To date the diagnosis has been confirmed in 12 affected individuals (including 2 sibs). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481926
Concept ID:
C3280296
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Warburg micro syndrome 2

MedGen UID:
481844
Concept ID:
C3280214
Disease or Syndrome
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