Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 6

1.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type 4

Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (vEDS) is characterized by thin, translucent skin; easy bruising; characteristic facial appearance (in some individuals); and arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility. Vascular dissection or rupture, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture are the presenting signs in the majority of adults identified to have vEDS. Arterial rupture may be preceded by aneurysm, arteriovenous fistulae, or dissection but also may occur spontaneously. Neonates may present with clubfoot and/or congenital dislocation of the hips. In childhood, inguinal hernia, pneumothorax, recurrent joint subluxation or dislocation, and bruising can occur. Pregnancy for women with vEDS has an estimated 5.3% risk for death from peripartum arterial rupture or uterine rupture. One fourth of individuals with vEDS, confirmed by laboratory testing, experienced a major complication by age 20 years and more than 80% by age 40 years. The median age of death in this reviewed population was 50 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82790
Concept ID:
C0268338
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Williams syndrome

Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to failure to thrive in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic disorder that affects the elastic tissue of the skin, the eye, and the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Individuals most commonly present with papules in the skin and/or with angioid streaks of the retina found on routine eye examination or associated with retinal hemorrhage. Rarely, individuals may present with vascular signs and symptoms, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, angina, or intermittent claudication. The most frequent cause of morbidity and disability in PXE is reduced vision from macular hemorrhage and disciform scarring of the macula. Most affected individuals live a normal life span. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18733
Concept ID:
C0033847
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
4.

Alstrom syndrome

Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive sensorineural hearing impairment, dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy, the insulin resistance syndrome, and multiple organ failure. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals. Hearing loss may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to type 2 diabetes in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate associated dyslipidemia. Other endocrine abnormalities can include hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in boys, and polycystic ovaries in girls. More than 60% of individuals with Alström syndrome develop cardiac failure as a result of dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy. About 50% of individuals have delay in early developmental milestones; intelligence is normal. Liver involvement includes elevation of transaminases, steatosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and steatohepatitis. Portal hypertension and cirrhosis can lead to hepatic encephalopathy and life-threatening esophageal varices. Pulmonary dysfunction and severe renal disease may also develop. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) can occur as early as the late teens. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Fibromuscular dysplasia

Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory arterial disease that most commonly involves the renal and carotid arteries. The prevalence of symptomatic renal artery FMD is about 4 in 1,000 and the prevalence of cervicocranial FMD is about half of that. Histologic classification includes 3 main subtypes, intimal, medial, and perimedial, which may be associated in a single patient. Angiographic classification includes the multifocal type, with multiple stenoses and the 'string of beads' appearance that is related to medial FMD, and tubular and focal types, which are not clearly related to specific histologic lesions (summary by Plouin et al., 2007) [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
376945
Concept ID:
C1851111
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Renovascular hypertension

The presence of hypertension related to stenosis of the renal artery. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506544
Concept ID:
CN117707
Finding
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity