Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 4

  • Wrong UID 504344
1.

Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is characterized by hemangioblastomas of the brain, spinal cord, and retina; renal cysts and clear cell renal cell carcinoma; pheochromocytoma, pancreatic cysts, and neuroendocrine tumors; endolymphatic sac tumors; and epididymal and broad ligament cysts. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas may be associated with headache, vomiting, gait disturbances, or ataxia. Spinal hemangioblastomas and related syrinx usually present with pain. Sensory and motor loss may develop with cord compression. Retinal hemangioblastomas may be the initial manifestation of VHL syndrome and can cause vision loss. Renal cell carcinoma occurs in about 70% of individuals with VHL and is the leading cause of mortality. Pheochromocytomas can be asymptomatic but may cause sustained or episodic hypertension. Pancreatic lesions often remain asymptomatic and rarely cause endocrine or exocrine insufficiency. Endolymphatic sac tumors can cause hearing loss of varying severity, which can be a presenting symptom. Cystadenomas of the epididymis are relatively common. They rarely cause problems, unless bilateral, in which case they may result in infertility. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42458
Concept ID:
C0019562
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Alagille syndrome 1

Alagille syndrome is a genetic disorder that can affect the liver, heart, and other parts of the body. One of the major features of Alagille syndrome is liver damage caused by abnormalities in the bile ducts. These ducts carry bile (which helps to digest fats) from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. In Alagille syndrome, the bile ducts may be narrow, malformed, and reduced in number (bile duct paucity). As a result, bile builds up in the liver and causes scarring that prevents the liver from working properly to eliminate wastes from the bloodstream. Signs and symptoms arising from liver damage in Alagille syndrome may include a yellowish tinge in the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice), itchy skin, and deposits of cholesterol in the skin (xanthomas). Alagille syndrome is also associated with several heart problems, including impaired blood flow from the heart into the lungs (pulmonic stenosis). Pulmonic stenosis may occur along with a hole between the two lower chambers of the heart (ventricular septal defect) and other heart abnormalities. This combination of heart defects is called tetralogy of Fallot. People with Alagille syndrome may have distinctive facial features including a broad, prominent forehead; deep-set eyes; and a small, pointed chin. The disorder may also affect the blood vessels within the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) and the kidneys. Affected individuals may have an unusual butterfly shape of the bones of the spinal column (vertebrae) that can be seen in an x-ray. Problems associated with Alagille syndrome generally become evident in infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder varies among affected individuals, even within the same family. Symptoms range from so mild as to go unnoticed to severe heart and/or liver disease requiring transplantation. Some people with Alagille syndrome may have isolated signs of the disorder, such as a heart defect like tetralogy of Fallot, or a characteristic facial appearance. These individuals do not have liver disease or other features typical of the disorder.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
365434
Concept ID:
C1956125
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

COACH syndrome

COACH syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, ataxia due to cerebellar hypoplasia, and hepatic fibrosis. Other features, such as coloboma and renal cysts, may be variable. COACH syndrome is considered by some to be a subtype of Joubert syndrome (JBTS; see 213300) with congenital hepatic fibrosis. Identification of liver disease in these patients is critical because some may develop complications such as portal hypertension with fatal variceal bleeding (Brancati et al., 2008; Doherty et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
387879
Concept ID:
C1857662
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Medullary cystic kidney disease 2

Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease, UMOD-related (ADTKD-UMOD) (previously UMOD-associated kidney disease) is also known as familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy type 1 (FJHN1) and medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2). Clinical findings typically include hyperuricemia and gout (resulting from reduced kidney excretion of uric acid) that usually occur as early as the teenage years. Slowly progressive interstitial kidney disease begins early in life. Elevations in serum creatinine usually occur between ages five and 40 years, leading to end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) usually between the fourth and seventh decade. The age at ESRD varies both between and within families. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349081
Concept ID:
C1859040
Disease or Syndrome
Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...