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  • Wrong UID 505044

Results: 15

1.

Tyrosinemia type I

Untreated tyrosinemia type I usually presents either in young infants with severe liver involvement or later in the first year with liver dysfunction and renal tubular dysfunction associated with growth failure and rickets. Untreated children may have repeated, often unrecognized, neurologic crises lasting one to seven days that can include change in mental status, abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, and/or respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Death in the untreated child usually occurs before age ten years, typically from liver failure, neurologic crisis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Combined treatment with nitisinone and a low-tyrosine diet has resulted in a greater than 90% survival rate, normal growth, improved liver function, prevention of cirrhosis, correction of renal tubular acidosis, and improvement in secondary rickets. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75688
Concept ID:
C0268490
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency

Complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase; EC 1.9.3.1) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain and consists of 13 polypeptide subunits, 3 of which are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The 3 mitochondrially encoded proteins in the cytochrome oxidase complex are the actual catalytic subunits that carry out the electron transport function (Saraste, 1983). See 123995 for discussion of some of the nuclear-encoded subunits. Shoubridge (2001) provided a comprehensive review of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and noted that most isolated COX deficiencies are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes; mutations in the mtDNA-encoded COX subunit genes are relatively rare. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75662
Concept ID:
C0268237
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

Deficiency of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which catalyzes the initial step of mitochondrial ß-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids with a chain length of 14 to 20 carbons, is associated with three phenotypes. The severe early-onset cardiac and multi-organ failure form typically presents in the first months of life with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy, pericardial effusion, and arrhythmias, as well as hypotonia, hepatomegaly, and intermittent hypoglycemia. The hepatic or hypoketotic hypoglycemic form typically presents during early childhood with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, but without cardiomyopathy. The later-onset episodic myopathic form presents with intermittent rhabdomyolysis, muscle cramps and/or pain, and/or exercise intolerance. Hypoglycemia typically is not present at the time of symptoms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87459
Concept ID:
C0342784
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cystinosis

Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal tubular Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine crystals in almost all cells, leading to cellular destruction and tissue dysfunction. The typical untreated child has short stature, light complexion, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these therapies, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1207
Concept ID:
C0010690
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Kearns Sayre syndrome

A mitochondrial disorder featuring the triad of chronic progressive EXTERNAL OPHTHALMOPLEGIA, cardiomyopathy (CARDIOMYOPATHIES) with conduction block (HEART BLOCK), and RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA. Disease onset is in the first or second decade. Elevated CSF protein, sensorineural deafness, seizures, and pyramidal signs may also be present. Ragged-red fibers are found on muscle biopsy. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p984) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9618
Concept ID:
C0022541
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Lowe syndrome

Lowe syndrome (oculocerebrorenal syndrome) is characterized by involvement of the eyes, central nervous system, and kidneys. Dense congenital cataracts are found in all affected boys and infantile glaucoma in approximately 50%. All boys have impaired vision; corrected acuity is rarely better than 20/100. Generalized hypotonia is noted at birth and is of central (brain) origin. Deep tendon reflexes are usually absent. Hypotonia may slowly improve with age, but normal motor tone and strength are never achieved. Motor milestones are delayed. Almost all affected males have some degree of intellectual disability; 10%-25% function in the low-normal or borderline range, approximately 25% in the mild-to-moderate range, and 50%-65% in the severe-to-profound range of intellectual disability. Affected males have varying degrees of proximal renal tubular dysfunction of the Fanconi type, including bicarbonate wasting and renal tubular acidosis, phosphaturia with hypophosphatemia and renal rickets, aminoaciduria, low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, sodium and potassium wasting, and polyuria. Fanconi syndrome is usually not clinically apparent in the first few months of life, but symptoms may appear by age six to 12 months. Glomerulosclerosis associated with chronic tubular injury usually results in slowly progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease after age ten to 20 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18145
Concept ID:
C0028860
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Mitochondrial myopathy

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
56484
Concept ID:
C0162670
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Pearson's syndrome

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion syndromes predominantly comprise three overlapping phenotypes that are usually simplex (i.e., a single occurrence in a family), but rarely may be observed in different members of the same family or may evolve in a given individual over time. The three phenotypes are Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), Pearson syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). Rarely Leigh syndrome can be a manifestation of a mtDNA deletion. KSS is a multisystem disorder defined by the triad of onset before age 20 years, pigmentary retinopathy, and PEO. In addition, affected individuals have at least one of the following: cardiac conduction block, cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration greater than 100 mg/dL, or cerebellar ataxia. Onset is usually in childhood. Pearson syndrome is characterized by sideroblastic anemia and exocrine pancreas dysfunction and is usually fatal in infancy. PEO, characterized by ptosis, paralysis of the extraocular muscles (ophthalmoplegia), oropharyngeal weakness, and variably severe proximal limb weakness, is relatively benign. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
90997
Concept ID:
C0342773
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Fanconi syndrome

Fanconi renotubular syndrome is a consequence of decreased solute and water reabsorption in the proximal tubule of the kidney. Patients have polydipsia and polyuria with phosphaturia, glycosuria, and aminoaciduria. They may develop hypophosphatemic rickets or osteomalacia, acidosis, and a tendency toward dehydration. Some will eventually develop renal insufficiency. Common laboratory abnormalities include glucosuria with a normal serum glucose, hyperaminoaciduria, hypophosphatemia, progressive renal insufficiency, renal sodium and potassium wasting, acidosis, uricosuria, and low-molecular-weight proteinuria (summary by Lichter-Konecki et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Fanconi Renotubular Syndrome Fanconi renotubular syndrome-1 has been mapped to chromosome 15q15.3. See also autosomal recessive FRTS2 (613388), caused by mutation in the SLC34A1 gene (182309) on chromosome 5q35, and autosomal dominant FRTS3 (615605), caused by mutation in the EHHADH gene (607037) on chromosome 3q27. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
4653
Concept ID:
C0015624
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Cystinosis, atypical nephropathic

MedGen UID:
413668
Concept ID:
C2749685
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Cystinosis

A metabolic disease characterized by the defective transport of CYSTINE across the lysosomal membrane due to mutation of a membrane protein cystinosin. This results in cystine accumulation and crystallization in the cells causing widespread tissue damage. In the KIDNEY, nephropathic cystinosis is a common cause of RENAL FANCONI SYNDROME. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
419735
Concept ID:
C2931187
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Mitochondrial cytopathy

MedGen UID:
419940
Concept ID:
C2931928
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Infantile nephropathic cystinosis

MedGen UID:
760976
Concept ID:
C3537440
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Congenital Fanconi syndrome

constellation of clinical and laboratory manifestations produced by generalized proximal tubular insufficiency in the presence of normal, or nearly normal, glomerular filtration. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
341765
Concept ID:
C1857395
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate 5-Phosphatase Deficiency

MedGen UID:
398779
Concept ID:
C2713392
Disease or Syndrome

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