Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 1 to 20 of 29

1.

Adrenoleukodystrophy

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and the adrenal cortex. Three main phenotypes are seen in affected males: The childhood cerebral form manifests most commonly between ages four and eight years. It initially resembles attention deficit disorder or hyperactivity; progressive impairment of cognition, behavior, vision, hearing, and motor function follow the initial symptoms and often lead to total disability within two years. Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) manifests most commonly in the late twenties as progressive paraparesis, sphincter disturbances, sexual dysfunction, and often, impaired adrenocortical function; all symptoms are progressive over decades. "Addison disease only" presents with primary adrenocortical insufficiency between age two years and adulthood and most commonly by age 7.5 years, without evidence of neurologic abnormality; however, some degree of neurologic disability (most commonly AMN) usually develops later. Approximately 20% of females who are carriers develop neurologic manifestations that resemble AMN but have later onset (age =35 years) and milder disease than do affected males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57667
Concept ID:
C0162309
Disease or Syndrome
2.

X-linked hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy

Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy X type 1 (CMTX1) is characterized by a moderate to severe motor and sensory neuropathy in affected males and usually mild to no symptoms in carrier females. Sensorineural deafness and central nervous system symptoms also occur in some families. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98290
Concept ID:
C0393808
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
350795
Concept ID:
C1862937
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome

Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is characterized by variable clinical presentation and age of onset. Neonatal onset (~12% of affected individuals). Infants are normal for the first 24-48 hours followed by onset of symptoms related to hyperammonemia (poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, low temperature, rapid breathing). Information on long-term outcome is limited. Infancy, childhood, and adult presentation (~88%). Affected individuals may present with: Chronic neurocognitive deficits (including developmental delay, ataxia, spasticity, learning disabilities, cognitive deficits and/or unexplained seizures); Acute encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemic crisis precipitated by a variety of factors; and Chronic liver dysfunction (unexplained elevation of liver transaminases with or without mild coagulopathy, with or without mild hyperammonemia and protein intolerance). Neurologic findings and cognitive abilities can continue to deteriorate despite early metabolic control that prevents hyperammonemia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82815
Concept ID:
C0268540
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Subacute neuronopathic Gaucher's disease

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78653
Concept ID:
C0268251
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Osteitis deformans

Paget disease is a metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormalities of increased bone turnover affecting 1 or more sites throughout the skeleton, primarily the axial skeleton. Bone lesions in this disorder show evidence of increased osteoclastic bone resorption and disorganized bone structure. Ralston et al. (2008) provided a detailed review of the pathogenesis and current management of the disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
10493
Concept ID:
C0029401
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Waardenburg syndrome type 4A

Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4), also known as Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, is an auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, skin, and eyes, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). WS type 4A is caused by mutation in the EDNRB gene (131244). Clinical Variability of Waardenburg Syndrome Types 1-4 Waardenburg syndrome has been classified into 4 main phenotypes. Type I Waardenburg syndrome (WS1; 193500) is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the hair, including a white forelock and premature graying; pigmentary changes of the iris, such as heterochromia iridis and brilliant blue eyes; congenital sensorineural hearing loss; and 'dystopia canthorum.' WS type II (WS2) is distinguished from type I by the absence of dystopia canthorum. WS type III (WS3; 148820) has dystopia canthorum and is distinguished by the presence of upper limb abnormalities. WS type 4 has the additional feature of Hirschsprung disease (reviews by Read and Newton, 1997 and Pingault et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 Waardenburg syndrome type 4 is genetically heterogeneous. WS4B (613265) is caused by mutation in the EDN3 gene (131242) on chromosome 20q13, and WS4C (613266) is caused by mutation in the SOX10 gene (602229) on chromosome 22q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
341244
Concept ID:
C1848519
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Oculodentodigital dysplasia

Oculodentodigital syndrome is characterized by a typical facial appearance and variable involvement of the eyes, dentition, and fingers. Characteristic facial features include a narrow, pinched nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, prominent columella and thin anteverted nares together with a narrow nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds giving the impression of hypertelorism. The teeth are usually small and carious. Typical eye findings include microphthalmia and microcornea. The characteristic digital malformation is complete syndactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers (syndactyly type III) but the third finger may be involved and associated camptodactyly is a common finding (summary by Judisch et al., 1979). Neurologic abnormalities are sometimes associated (Gutmann et al., 1991), and lymphedema has been reported in some patients with ODDD (Brice et al., 2013). See review by De Bock et al. (2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculodentodigital Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of ODDD (257850) is also caused by mutation in the GJA1 gene, but the majority of cases are autosomal dominant. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
167236
Concept ID:
C0812437
Congenital Abnormality
9.

Parkinson disease 9

Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338281
Concept ID:
C1847640
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive

Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease (BTBGD) is characterized by recurrent subacute encephalopathy manifest as confusion, seizures, ataxia, dystonia, supranuclear facial palsy, external ophthalmoplegia, and/or dysphagia which - if left untreated - can eventually lead to coma and even death. Dystonia and cogwheel rigidity are nearly always present; hyperreflexia, ankle clonus, and Babinski responses are common. Hemiparesis or quadriparesis may be seen. Episodes are often triggered by febrile illness or mild trauma or surgery. Less frequently, BTBGD presents as chronic or slowly progressive dystonia, seizures, and/or psychomotor delay. Although onset is usually in childhood (ages three to ten 10 years), it is extremely variable, ranging from the newborn period to adulthood. Prompt administration of biotin and thiamine early in the disease course results in partial or complete improvement within days. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
375289
Concept ID:
C1843807
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease

The neurologic variant of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a complex neurocristopathy that includes features of 4 distinct syndromes: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy (see 118200), central dysmyelination, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (see 142623) (Inoue et al., 2004). Inoue et al. (2004) proposed the acronym PCWH for this disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
373160
Concept ID:
C1836727
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 2

For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080. The hypomyelinating leukodystrophy Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD; 312080) is an X-linked disorder characterized by nystagmus, progressive spasticity, and ataxia. Uhlenberg et al. (2004) described patients with a PMD-like phenotype inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
325157
Concept ID:
C1837355
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia and cirrhosis

The disorder dystonia/parkinsonism, hypermanganesemia, polycythemia, and chronic liver disease is characterized by the following: A movement disorder resulting from manganese accumulation in the basal ganglia. Whole-blood manganese concentrations that often exceed 2000 nmol/L (normal: <320 nmol/L). Polycythemia. Hepatomegaly with variable hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis. Neurologic findings can manifest either in childhood (ages 2-15 years) as four-limb dystonia, leading to a characteristic high-stepping gait (“cock-walk gait”), dysarthria, fine tremor, and bradykinesia or on occasion spastic paraplegia, or in adulthood as parkinsonism (shuffling gait, rigidity, bradykinesia, hypomimia, and monotone speech) unresponsive to L-dopa treatment. Hepatic failure, secondary complications of cirrhosis, and the neurologic disorder shorten life expectancy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
412958
Concept ID:
C2750442
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Neurofibromatosis, familial spinal

Spinal neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a high load of spinal tumors. These tumors may be asymptomatic or result in neurologic symptoms, including back pain, difficulty walking, and paresthesias. Spinal NF is considered to be a subtype of neurofibromatosis type I (NF1; 162200), which is an allelic disorder. Patients with spinal NF may or may not have the classic cutaneous cafe-au-lait pigmentary macules or ocular Lisch nodules typically observed in patients with classic NF1. Patients with spinal NF should be followed closely for spinal sequelae (summary by Burkitt Wright et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320296
Concept ID:
C1834235
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating 3

Autosomal recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-3 (HLD3) is a severe neurologic disorder characterized by early infantile onset of global developmental delay, lack of development, lack of speech acquisition, and peripheral spasticity associated with decreased myelination in the central nervous system (summary by Feinstein et al., 2010). The disorder is phenotypically similar to X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD; 312080), which is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene (300401). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
342403
Concept ID:
C1850053
Disease or Syndrome
16.

HTLV-1-associated myelopathy-tropical spastic paraparesis

A subacute paralytic myeloneuropathy occurring endemically in tropical areas such as the Caribbean, Colombia, India, and Africa, as well as in the southwestern region of Japan; associated with infection by HUMAN T-CELL LEUKEMIA VIRUS I. Clinical manifestations include a slowly progressive spastic weakness of the legs, increased reflexes, Babinski signs, incontinence, and loss of vibratory and position sensation. On pathologic examination inflammatory, demyelination, and necrotic lesions may be found in the spinal cord. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1239) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18298
Concept ID:
C0030481
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Mast syndrome

Mast syndrome is an autosomal recessive complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia in which progressive spastic paraparesis is associated in more advanced cases with cognitive decline, dementia, and other neurologic abnormalities. Symptom onset usually occurs in adulthood, and the disorder is progressive with variable severity. Brain imaging shows thinning of the corpus callosum. The disorder occurs with high frequency in the Old Order Amish (summary by Simpson et al., 2003). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
343325
Concept ID:
C1855346
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Ataxia, spastic, 4, autosomal recessive

MedGen UID:
462275
Concept ID:
C3150925
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Spastic ataxia 5, autosomal recessive

Spastic ataxia-5 (SPAX5) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early-onset spasticity resulting in significantly impaired ambulation, cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, and myoclonic epilepsy (summary by Pierson et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of spastic ataxia, see SPAX1 (108600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482607
Concept ID:
C3280977
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Branchial myoclonus with spastic paraparesis and cerebellar ataxia

MedGen UID:
349424
Concept ID:
C1862071
Disease or Syndrome

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...