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Everted upper lip vermilion

MedGen UID:
451132
Concept ID:
CN116537
Finding
 
HPO: HP:0010803

Definition

Inner aspect of the upper lip vermilion (normally apposing the teeth) visible in a frontal view, i.e., the presence of an everted upper lip. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews
  • CROGEverted upper lip vermilion

Conditions with this feature

Hypohidrotic X-linked ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
57890
Concept ID:
C0162359
Congenital Abnormality
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow-growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, and at a later than average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits.
Autosomal recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
96067
Concept ID:
C0406702
Congenital Abnormality
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow-growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, and at a later than average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits.
Smith-Magenis syndrome
MedGen UID:
162881
Concept ID:
C0795864
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by distinctive physical features (particularly facial features that progress with age), developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. Infants have feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, prolonged napping or need to be awakened for feeds, and generalized lethargy. The majority of individuals function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. The behavioral phenotype, including significant sleep disturbance, stereotypies, and maladaptive and self-injurious behaviors, is generally not recognized until age 18 months or older and continues to change until adulthood. Sensory integration issues are frequently noted. Children and adults typically have inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, impulsivity, maladaptive behaviors including frequent outbursts/temper tantrums, attention seeking, disobedience, aggression, toileting difficulties, and self-injurious behaviors (SIB) including self-hitting, self-biting, and/or skin picking, inserting foreign objects into body orifices (polyembolokoilamania), and yanking fingernails and/or toenails (onychotillomania). Among the stereotypic behaviors described, the spasmodic upper-body squeeze or "self-hug" seems to be highly associated with SMS. The finger lick and page flipping ("lick and flip") behavior may be less prevalent than initially reported. An underlying developmental asynchrony, specifically between intellectual functioning and emotional maturity, may also contribute to maladaptive behaviors in people with SMS.
Gaucher disease, perinatal lethal
MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.

Recent clinical studies

Diagnosis

Liu YH, Xie RG, Zhang XY, Wei SD, He Y, Xu WF, Lin YY, Xiong F
Gene 2012 Nov 1;509(1):164-7. Epub 2012 Aug 8 doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2012.07.052. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22959136
Chen CP, Lin CC, Chuang CY, Lee CC, Chen WL, Jan SW, Lin SP
Prenat Diagn 1997 Jul;17(7):675-80. PMID: 9249870

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