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Results: 1 to 20 of 155

1.

Ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome

Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune defects, and a predisposition to malignancy. Chromosomal breakage is a feature. AT cells are abnormally sensitive to killing by ionizing radiation (IR), and abnormally resistant to inhibition of DNA synthesis by ionizing radiation. The latter trait has been used to identify complementation groups for the classic form of the disease (Jaspers et al., 1988). At least 4 of these (A, C, D, and E) map to chromosome 11q23 (Sanal et al., 1990) and are associated with mutations in the ATM gene. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
439
Concept ID:
C0004135
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Leigh's disease

Leigh syndrome is an early-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a characteristic neuropathology consisting of focal, bilateral lesions in one or more areas of the central nervous system, including the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions are areas of demyelination, gliosis, necrosis, spongiosis, or capillary proliferation. Clinical symptoms depend on which areas of the central nervous system are involved. The most common underlying cause is a defect in oxidative phosphorylation (Dahl, 1998). Leigh syndrome may be a feature of a deficiency of any of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes: complex I deficiency (252010), complex II deficiency (252011), complex III deficiency (124000), complex IV deficiency (cytochrome c oxidase; 220110), or complex V deficiency (604273). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44095
Concept ID:
C0023264
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Rett's disorder

MECP2-related disorders in females include classic Rett syndrome, variant Rett syndrome, and mild learning disabilities. A MECP2 mutation in a male is presumed to most often be lethal; phenotypes in rare surviving males are primarily severe neonatal encephalopathy and manic-depressive psychosis, pyramidal signs, Parkinsonian, and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome). Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Atypical Rett syndrome is observed increasingly as MECP2 mutations are identified in individuals previously diagnosed with: clinically suspected but molecularly unconfirmed Angelman syndrome; intellectual disability with spasticity or tremor; mild learning disability; or (rarely) autism. Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before age two years is the most common phenotype observed in affected males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Azorean disease

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and variable findings including a dystonic-rigid syndrome, a parkinsonian syndrome, or a combined syndrome of dystonia and peripheral neuropathy. Neurologic findings tend to evolve as the disease progresses. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9841
Concept ID:
C0024408
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Wilson's disease

Wilson disease is a disorder of copper metabolism that can present with hepatic, neurologic, or psychiatric disturbances, or a combination of these, in individuals ranging from age three years to over 50 years; symptoms vary among and within families. Liver disease includes recurrent jaundice, simple acute self-limited hepatitis-like illness, autoimmune-type hepatitis, fulminant hepatic failure, or chronic liver disease. Neurologic presentations include movement disorders (tremors, poor coordination, loss of fine-motor control, chorea, choreoathetosis) or rigid dystonia (mask-like facies, rigidity, gait disturbance, pseudobulbar involvement). Psychiatric disturbance includes depression, neurotic behaviors, disorganization of personality, and, occasionally, intellectual deterioration. Kayser-Fleischer rings, frequently present, result from copper deposition in Descemet's membrane of the cornea and reflect a high degree of copper storage in the body. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42426
Concept ID:
C0019202
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

PLP1-related disorders of central nervous system myelin formation include a range of phenotypes from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). PMD typically manifests in infancy or early childhood with nystagmus, hypotonia, and cognitive impairment; the findings progress to severe spasticity and ataxia. Life span is shortened. SPG2 manifests as spastic paraparesis with or without CNS involvement and usually normal life span. Intrafamilial variation of phenotypes can be observed, but the signs are usually fairly consistent within families. Female carriers may manifest mild to moderate signs of the disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61440
Concept ID:
C0205711
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Alzheimer disease, type 3

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by adult-onset progressive dementia associated with cerebral cortical atrophy, beta-amyloid plaque formation, and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. AD typically begins with subtle memory failure that becomes more severe and is eventually incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, hallucinations, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism. Familial AD (FAD) characterizes families that have more than one member with AD and usually implies multiple affected persons in more than one generation. Early-onset FAD (EOFAD) refers to families in which onset is consistently before age 60 to 65 years and often before age 55 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
334304
Concept ID:
C1843013
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Propionic acidemia

The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by poor feeding, vomiting, and somnolence in the first days of life in a previously healthy infant, followed by lethargy, seizures, coma, and death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Late-onset PA includes developmental regression, chronic vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and occasionally basal ganglia infarction (resulting in dystonia and choreoathetosis) and cardiomyopathy. Affected children can have an acute decompensation that resembles the neonatal presentation and is precipitated by a catabolic stress such as infection, injury, or surgery. Isolated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), and chronic renal failure. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Metachromatic leukodystrophy

Arylsulfatase A deficiency (also known as metachromatic leukodystrophy or MLD) is characterized by three clinical subtypes: late-infantile MLD (50%-60% of cases); juvenile MLD (20%-30% of cases); and adult MLD (15%-20% of cases). Age of onset within a family is usually similar. The disease course may be from three to ten or more years in the late-infantile form and up to 20 years or more in the juvenile and adult forms. Late-infantile MLD. Onset is between ages one and two years. Typical presenting findings include weakness, hypotonia, clumsiness, frequent falls, toe walking, and slurred speech. Later signs include inability to stand, difficulty with speech, deterioration of mental function, increased muscle tone, pain in the arms and legs, generalized or partial seizures, compromised vision and hearing, and peripheral neuropathy. In the final stages children have tonic spasms, decerebrate posturing, and general unawareness of their surroundings. Juvenile MLD. Onset is between age four years and sexual maturity (age 12-14 years). Initial manifestations include decline in school performance and emergence of behavioral problems, followed by clumsiness, gait problems, slurred speech, incontinence, and bizarre behaviors. Seizures may occur. Progression is similar to but slower than the late-infantile form. Adult MLD. Onset occurs after sexual maturity, sometimes not until the fourth or fifth decade. Initial signs can include problems in school or job performance, personality changes, alcohol or drug abuse, poor money management, and emotional lability; in others, neurologic symptoms (weakness and loss of coordination progressing to spasticity and incontinence) or seizures predominate initially. Peripheral neuropathy is common. Disease course is variable, with periods of stability interspersed with periods of decline, and may extend over two to three decades. The final stage is similar to that for the earlier-onset forms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6071
Concept ID:
C0023522
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Niemann-Pick disease type C1

Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a lipid storage disease that can present in infants, children, or adults. Neonates can present with ascites and severe liver disease from infiltration of the liver and/or respiratory failure from infiltration of the lungs. Other infants, without liver or pulmonary disease, have hypotonia and developmental delay. The classic presentation occurs in mid-to-late childhood with the insidious onset of ataxia, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP), and dementia. Dystonia and seizures are common. Dysarthria and dysphagia eventually become disabling, making oral feeding impossible; death usually occurs in the late second or third decade from aspiration pneumonia. Adults are more likely to present with dementia or psychiatric symptoms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
465922
Concept ID:
C3179455
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Leber's optic atrophy

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
182973
Concept ID:
C0917796
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Ganglioside sialidase deficiency

Mucolipidosis IV is characterized by severe psychomotor delay evident by the end of the first year of life and slowly progressive visual impairment during the first decade as a result of a combination of corneal clouding and retinal degeneration. By the end of the first decade of life and certainly by their early teens, all individuals with typical mucolipidosis IV have severe visual impairment as a result of retinal degeneration. Neurodegeneration is thought to occur in no more than 15% of individuals. About 5% of individuals have atypical mucolipidosis IV, often manifest as less severe psychomotor retardation and/or eye findings. About 70% of individuals with mucolipidosis IV are of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
68663
Concept ID:
C0238286
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Episodic ataxia type 2

Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of ataxia, vertigo, and nausea typically lasting minutes to days in duration. Attacks can be associated with dysarthria, diplopia, tinnitus, dystonia, hemiplegia, and headache. About 50% of individuals with EA2 have migraine headaches. Onset is typically in childhood or early adolescence (age range 2-32 years). Frequency of attacks can range from once or twice a year to three or four times a week. Attacks can be triggered by stress, exertion, caffeine, alcohol, fever, heat, and phenytoin and can be stopped or decreased in frequency and severity by administration of acetazolamide. Between attacks, individuals may initially be asymptomatic but eventually develop interictal findings that can include nystagmus and ataxia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
314039
Concept ID:
C1720416
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Parkinson's disease

Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10590
Concept ID:
C0030567
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is characterized by motor dysfunction that resembles cerebral palsy, cognitive and behavioral disturbances, and uric acid overproduction (hyperuricemia). The most common presenting features, hypotonia and developmental delay, are evident by age three to six months. Affected children are delayed in sitting and most never walk. Within the first few years, extrapyramidal involvement (e.g., dystonia, choreoathetosis, opisthotonos) and pyramidal involvement (e.g., spasticity, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar reflexes) become evident. Cognitive impairment and behavioral disturbances emerge between ages two and three years. Persistent self-injurious behavior (biting the fingers, hands, lips, and cheeks; banging the head or limbs) is a hallmark of the disease. Overproduction of uric acid may lead to deposition of uric acid crystals or calculi in the kidneys, ureters, or bladder. Gouty arthritis may occur later in the disease. Related disorders with less severe manifestations include hyperuricemia with neurologic dysfunction but no self-injurious behavior and hyperuricemia alone, sometimes with acute renal failure. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9721
Concept ID:
C0023374
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Glutaric aciduria, type 1

The term "organic acidemia" or "organic aciduria" (OA) applies to a group of disorders characterized by the excretion of non-amino organic acids in urine. Most organic acidemias result from dysfunction of a specific step in amino acid catabolism, usually the result of deficient enzyme activity. The majority of the classic organic acid disorders are caused by abnormal amino acid catabolism of branched-chain amino acids or lysine. They include maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), propionic acidemia, methylmalonic acidemia (MMA), methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria, isovaleric acidemia, biotin-unresponsive 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) lyase deficiency, ketothiolase deficiency, and glutaricacidemia type I (GA I). A neonate affected with an OA is usually well at birth and for the first few days of life. The usual clinical presentation is that of toxic encephalopathy and includes vomiting, poor feeding, neurologic symptoms such as seizures and abnormal tone, and lethargy progressing to coma. Outcome is enhanced by diagnosis and treatment in the first ten days of life. In the older child or adolescent, variant forms of the OAs can present as loss of intellectual function, ataxia or other focal neurologic signs, Reye syndrome, recurrent ketoacidosis, or psychiatric symptoms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
124337
Concept ID:
C0268595
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Parkinson disease 2

Parkin type of early-onset Parkinson disease is characterized by rigidity, bradykinesia, and resting tremor. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign. Onset usually occurs between ages 20 and 40 years with an average age of onset in the early to mid-thirties. The disease is slowly progressive and disease duration of more than 50 years has been reported. Clinical signs vary; hyperreflexia is common. Dyskinesia as a result of treatment with levodopa frequently occurs. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
401500
Concept ID:
C1868675
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Dystonia 1

DYT1 early-onset primary dystonia typically presents in childhood or adolescence and only on occasion in adulthood. Dystonic muscle contractions causing posturing of a foot, leg, or arm are the most common presenting findings. Dystonia is usually first apparent with specific actions such as writing or walking. Over time, the contractions frequently (but not invariably) become evident with less specific actions and spread to other body regions. No other neurologic abnormalities are present, except for postural arm tremor. Disease severity varies considerably even within the same family. Isolated writer's cramp may be the only sign. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338823
Concept ID:
C1851945
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome

The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as dystonia 9, dystonia 18, atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings such as intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures begin before age two years in approximately 90% and later in approximately 10%. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continuous with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting, fever, and intercurrent infection. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
337833
Concept ID:
C1847501
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Dystonia 18

The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as dystonia 9, dystonia 18, atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings such as intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures begin before age two years in approximately 90% and later in approximately 10%. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continuous with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting, fever, and intercurrent infection. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
330866
Concept ID:
C1842534
Disease or Syndrome

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