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Results: 1 to 20 of 46

1.

Fabry's disease

Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase (a-Gal A) and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesias), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhydrosis, hypohydosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, they may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity may have either (1) a cardiac variant phenotype that usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, mitral insufficiency and/or cardiomyopathy, and proteinuria, but without ESRD; or (2) a renal variant phenotype, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome

The PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS) includes Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS), PTEN-related Proteus syndrome (PS), and Proteus-like syndrome. CS is a multiple hamartoma syndrome with a high risk for benign and malignant tumors of the thyroid, breast, and endometrium. Affected individuals usually have macrocephaly, trichilemmomas, and papillomatous papules, and present by the late 20s. The lifetime risk of developing breast cancer is 85%, with an average age of diagnosis between 38 and 46 years. The lifetime risk for thyroid cancer (usually follicular, rarely papillary, but never medullary thyroid cancer) is approximately 35%. The risk for endometrial cancer, although not well defined, may approach 28%. BRRS is a congenital disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal hamartomatous polyposis, lipomas, and pigmented macules of the glans penis. PS is a complex, highly variable disorder involving congenital malformations and hamartomatous overgrowth of multiple tissues, as well as connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, and hyperostoses. Proteus-like syndrome is undefined but refers to individuals with significant clinical features of PS who do not meet the diagnostic criteria for PS. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78554
Concept ID:
C0265326
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Williams syndrome

Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to failure to thrive in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome

Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, progeria) is characterized by clinical features that develop in childhood and resemble some features of accelerated aging. Although signs and symptoms vary in age of onset and severity, they are remarkably consistent overall. Children with HGPS usually appear normal at birth. Profound failure to thrive occurs during the first year. Characteristic facies, with receding mandible, narrow nasal bridge and pointed nasal tip develop. During the first to third year the following usually become apparent: partial alopecia progressing to total alopecia, loss of subcutaneous fat, progressive joint contractures, bone changes, nail dystrophy, and abnormal tightness and/or small soft outpouchings of the skin over the abdomen and upper thighs, and delayed primary tooth eruption. Later findings include low-frequency conductive hearing loss, dental crowding, and partial lack of secondary tooth eruption. Additional findings present in some but not all affected individuals include photophobia, excessive ocular tearing, exposure keratitis, and Raynaud phenomenon. Motor and mental development is normal. Death occurs as a result of complications of severe atherosclerosis, either cardiac disease (myocardial infarction) or cerebrovascular disease (stroke), generally between ages six and 20 years. Average life span is approximately 13 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
46123
Concept ID:
C0033300
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hurler syndrome

Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes, Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome, no biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap; thus, affected individuals are best described as having either severe or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory-tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal. By age three years, linear growth ceases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound. Hearing loss is common. Death, typically caused by cardiorespiratory failure, usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decades to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities can be present. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. Hearing loss and cardiac valvular disease are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Lipodystrophy, familial partial, type 2

Familial partial lipodystrophy is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution beginning in late childhood or early adult life. Affected individuals gradually lose fat from the upper and lower extremities and the gluteal and truncal regions, resulting in a muscular appearance with prominent superficial veins. In some patients, adipose tissue accumulates on the face and neck, causing a double chin, fat neck, or cushingoid appearance. Metabolic abnormalities include insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosis nigricans and hypertriglyceridemia; hirsutism and menstrual abnormalities occur infrequently. Familial partial lipodystrophy may also be referred to as lipoatrophic diabetes mellitus, but the essential feature is loss of subcutaneous fat (review by Garg, 2004). The disorder may be misdiagnosed as Cushing disease (see 219080) (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986; Garg, 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy Familial partial lipodystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Types 1 and 2 were originally described as clinical subtypes: type 1 (FPLD1; 608600), characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat confined to the limbs (Kobberling et al., 1975), and FPLD2, characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat from the limbs and trunk (Dunnigan et al., 1974; Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). No genetic basis for FPLD1 has yet been delineated. FPLD3 (604367) is caused by mutation in the PPARG gene (601487) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD4 (613877) is caused by mutation in the PLIN1 gene (170290) on chromosome 15q26; and FPLD5 (615238) is caused by mutation in the CIDEC gene (612120) on chromosome 3p25. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
354526
Concept ID:
C1720860
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Werner syndrome

Werner syndrome is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Individuals with Werner syndrome develop normally until the end of the first decade. The first sign is the lack of a growth spurt during the early teen years. Early findings (usually observed in the 20s) include loss and graying of hair, hoarseness, and scleroderma-like skin changes, followed by bilateral ocular cataracts, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, skin ulcers, and osteoporosis in the 30s. Myocardial infarction and cancer are the most common causes of death; the mean age of death in individuals with Werner syndrome is 54 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
12147
Concept ID:
C0043119
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Alkaptonuria

Alkaptonuria is caused by deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, an enzyme that converts homogentisic acid (HGA) to maleylacetoacetic acid in the tyrosine degradation pathway. The three major features of alkaptonuria are the presence of HGA in the urine, ochronosis (bluish-black pigmentation in connective tissue), and arthritis of the spine and larger joints. Oxidation of the HGA excreted in the urine produces a melanin-like product and causes the urine to turn dark upon standing. Ochronosis occurs only after age 30 years; arthritis often begins in the third decade. Other manifestations include pigment deposition, aortic or mitral valve calcification or regurgitation and occasionally aortic dilatation, renal stones, and prostate stones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1413
Concept ID:
C0002066
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 6

The major cardiovascular manifestations of thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections (TAAD) include: (1) dilatation of the ascending thoracic aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva or ascending aorta or both; and (2) dissections of the thoracic aorta involving either the ascending (Stanford type A dissections) or descending aorta (Stanford type B). Rarely an aneurysm involving the descending thoracic aorta is observed. Vascular manifestations can be the only findings. In the absence of surgical repair of the ascending aorta, affected individuals typically have progressive enlargement of the ascending aorta leading to an acute aortic dissection. The age of onset and presentation of the aortic disease are highly variable, as are the other vascular diseases and features associated with the aortic disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
435866
Concept ID:
C2673186
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Supravalvar aortic stenosis

Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before birth. This defect is a narrowing (stenosis) of the large blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body (the aorta). The condition is described as supravalvular because the section of the aorta that is narrowed is located just above the valve that connects the aorta with the heart (the aortic valve). Some people with SVAS also have defects in other blood vessels, most commonly stenosis of the artery from the heart to the lungs (the pulmonary artery). An abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur) can often be heard during a chest exam. If SVAS is not treated, the aortic narrowing can lead to shortness of breath, chest pain, and ultimately heart failure. The severity of SVAS varies considerably, even among family members. Some affected individuals die in infancy, while others never experience symptoms of the disorder.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
2001
Concept ID:
C0003499
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hypobetalipoproteinemia, familial, associated with apob32

Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is a disorder that impairs the body's ability to absorb and transport fats. This condition is characterized by low levels of a fat-like substance called cholesterol in the blood. The severity of signs and symptoms experienced by people with FHBL vary widely. The most mildly affected individuals have few problems with absorbing fats from the diet and no related signs and symptoms. Many individuals with FHBL develop an abnormal buildup of fats in the liver called hepatic steatosis or fatty liver. In more severely affected individuals, fatty liver may progress to chronic liver disease (cirrhosis). Individuals with severe FHBL have greater difficulty absorbing fats as well as fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin E and vitamin A. This difficulty in fat absorption leads to excess fat in the feces (steatorrhea). In childhood, these digestive problems can result in an inability to grow or gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive).
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
349549
Concept ID:
C1862596
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 4

The major cardiovascular manifestations of thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections (TAAD) include: (1) dilatation of the ascending thoracic aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva or ascending aorta or both; and (2) dissections of the thoracic aorta involving either the ascending (Stanford type A dissections) or descending aorta (Stanford type B). Rarely an aneurysm involving the descending thoracic aorta is observed. Vascular manifestations can be the only findings. In the absence of surgical repair of the ascending aorta, affected individuals typically have progressive enlargement of the ascending aorta leading to an acute aortic dissection. The age of onset and presentation of the aortic disease are highly variable, as are the other vascular diseases and features associated with the aortic disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338704
Concept ID:
C1851504
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Hypercholesterolemia, autosomal dominant, type B

Hypercholesterolemia is a condition characterized by very high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is produced in the body and obtained from foods that come from animals (particularly egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products). The body needs this substance to build cell membranes, make certain hormones, and produce compounds that aid in fat digestion. Too much cholesterol, however, increases a person's risk of developing heart disease. People with hypercholesterolemia have a high risk of developing a form of heart disease called coronary artery disease. This condition occurs when excess cholesterol in the bloodstream is deposited in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the arteries that supply blood to the heart (coronary arteries). The abnormal buildup of cholesterol forms clumps (plaque) that narrow and harden artery walls. As the clumps get bigger, they can clog the arteries and restrict the flow of blood to the heart. The buildup of plaque in coronary arteries causes a form of chest pain called angina and greatly increases a person's risk of having a heart attack. Inherited forms of hypercholesterolemia can also cause health problems related to the buildup of excess cholesterol in other tissues. If cholesterol accumulates in tendons, it causes characteristic growths called tendon xanthomas. These growths most often affect the Achilles tendons and tendons in the hands and fingers. Yellowish cholesterol deposits under the skin of the eyelids are known as xanthelasmata. Cholesterol can also accumulate at the edges of the clear, front surface of the eye (the cornea), leading to a gray-colored ring called an arcus cornealis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
309962
Concept ID:
C1704417
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Scleroderma, familial progressive

Systemic sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by immune activation, vascular damage, and fibrosis of the skin and major internal organs. Clinical and experimental data suggest that the disorder is multifactorial, involving both genetic and environmental factors (Fonseca et al., 2007). Gabrielli et al. (2009) provided a detailed review of scleroderma, including clinical manifestations and pathophysiology. See also Reynolds syndrome (613471), which shares some clinical features with scleroderma and CREST syndrome. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
356661
Concept ID:
C1866983
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Arterial tortuosity syndrome

Arterial tortuosity syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissue provides strength and flexibility to structures throughout the body, including blood vessels, skin, joints, and the gastrointestinal tract. As its name suggests, arterial tortuosity syndrome is characterized by blood vessel abnormalities, particularly abnormal twists and turns (tortuosity) of the blood vessels that carry blood from the heart to the rest of the body (the arteries). Tortuosity arises from abnormal elongation of the arteries; since the end points of the arteries are fixed, the extra length twists and curves. Other blood vessel abnormalities that may occur in this disorder include constriction (stenosis) and abnormal bulging (aneurysm) of vessels, as well as small clusters of enlarged blood vessels just under the skin (telangiectasia). Complications resulting from the abnormal arteries can be life-threatening. Rupture of an aneurysm or sudden tearing (dissection) of the layers in an arterial wall can result in massive loss of blood from the circulatory system. Blockage of blood flow to vital organs such as the heart, lungs, or brain can lead to heart attacks, respiratory problems, and strokes. Stenosis of the arteries forces the heart to work harder to pump blood and may lead to heart failure. As a result of these complications, arterial tortuosity syndrome is often fatal in childhood, although some individuals with mild cases of the disorder live into adulthood. Features of arterial tortuosity syndrome outside the circulatory system are caused by abnormal connective tissue in other parts of the body. These features include joints that are either loose and very flexible (hypermobile) or that have deformities limiting movement (contractures), and unusually soft and stretchable skin. Some affected individuals have long, slender fingers and toes (arachnodactyly); curvature of the spine (scoliosis); or a chest that is either sunken (pectus excavatum) or protruding (pectus carinatum). They may have protrusion of organs through gaps in muscles (hernias), elongation of the intestines, or pouches called diverticula in the intestinal walls. People with arterial tortuosity syndrome often look older than their age and have distinctive facial features including a long, narrow face with droopy cheeks; eye openings that are narrowed (blepharophimosis) with outside corners that point downward (downslanting palpebral fissures); a beaked nose with soft cartilage; a high, arched roof of the mouth (palate); a small lower jaw (micrognathia); and large ears. The cornea, which is the clear front covering of the eye, may be cone-shaped and abnormally thin (keratoconus).
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
347942
Concept ID:
C1859726
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Susceptibility to severe cutaneous adverse reaction

MedGen UID:
326760
Concept ID:
C1840548
Finding
17.

Polycythemia vera

Polycythemia vera, the most common form of primary polycythemia, is caused by somatic mutation in a single hematopoietic stem cell leading to clonal hematopoiesis. PV is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized predominantly by erythroid hyperplasia, but also by myeloid leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and splenomegaly. Familial cases of PV are very rare and usually manifest in elderly patients (Cario, 2005). PV is distinct from the familial erythrocytoses (see, e.g., ECYT1, 133100), which are caused by inherited mutations resulting in hypersensitivity of erythroid progenitors to hormonal influences or increased levels of circulating hormones, namely erythropoietin (EPO; 133170) (Prchal, 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
45996
Concept ID:
C0032463
Neoplastic Process
18.

Lipodystrophy, familial partial, type 3

This type can be caused by mutation in the gene encoding PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR GAMMA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
328393
Concept ID:
C1720861
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Lipodystrophy, familial partial, type 1

Familial partial lipodystrophy type 1 (FPLD1), or Kobberling-type lipodystrophy, is characterized by loss of adipose tissue confined to the extremities, with normal or increased distribution of fat on the face, neck, and trunk (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
318591
Concept ID:
C1720859
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Acute febrile mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome

Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of infants and children characterized by prolonged fever unresponsive to antibiotics, polymorphous skin rash, erythema of the oral mucosa, lips, and tongue, erythema of the palms and soles, bilateral conjunctival injection, and cervical lymphadenopathy (Kawasaki, 1967). Coronary artery aneurysms develop in 15 to 25% of those left untreated (Kato et al., 1975, 1996), making Kawasaki disease the leading cause of acquired heart disease among children in developed countries. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) abrogates the inflammation in approximately 80% of affected individuals and reduces the aneurysm rate to less than 5%. Cardiac sequelae of the aneurysms include ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Epidemiologic features such as seasonality and clustering of cases suggested an infectious trigger, although no pathogen had been isolated. Several lines of evidence suggested the importance of genetic factors in disease susceptibility and outcome. First, the incidence of Kawasaki disease is 10 to 20 times higher in Japan than in Western countries (Cook et al., 1989). Second, the risk of Kawasaki disease in sibs of affected children is 10 times higher than in the general population, and the incidence of Kawasaki disease in children born to parents with a history of Kawasaki disease is twice as high as that in the general population (Fujita et al., 1989; Uehara et al., 2003). Hata and Onouchi (2009) reviewed current knowledge on Kawasaki disease, including epidemiology, genomewide linkage analysis, and molecular genetics. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
10118
Concept ID:
C0026691
Disease or Syndrome

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