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Results: 1 to 20 of 324

1.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy

The dystrophinopathies include a spectrum of muscle disease caused by mutations in DMD, which encodes the protein dystrophin. The mild end of the spectrum includes the phenotypes of asymptomatic increase in serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and muscle cramps with myoglobinuria and isolated quadriceps myopathy. The severe end of the spectrum includes progressive muscle diseases that are classified as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy when skeletal muscle is primarily affected and as DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) when the heart is primarily affected. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) usually presents in early childhood with delayed milestones, including delays in sitting and standing independently. Proximal weakness causes a waddling gait and difficulty climbing. DMD is rapidly progressive, with affected children being wheelchair dependent by age 12 years. Cardiomyopathy occurs in individuals with DMD after age 18 years. Few survive beyond the third decade, with respiratory complications and cardiomyopathy being common causes of death. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by later-onset skeletal muscle weakness; individuals remain ambulatory into their 20s. Despite the milder skeletal muscle involvement, heart failure from DCM is a common cause of morbidity and the most common cause of death in BMD. Mean age of death is in the mid-40s. DMD-associated DCM is characterized by left ventricular dilation and congestive heart failure. Females heterozygous for a DMD mutation are at increased risk for DCM. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3925
Concept ID:
C0013264
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Fabry's disease

Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase (a-Gal A) and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesias), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhydrosis, hypohydosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, they may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity may have either (1) a cardiac variant phenotype that usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, mitral insufficiency and/or cardiomyopathy, and proteinuria, but without ESRD; or (2) a renal variant phenotype, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Noonan syndrome 1

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, characteristic facies, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one third of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
22527
Concept ID:
C0041409
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a growth disorder characterized by macrosomia, macroglossia, visceromegaly, embryonal tumors (e.g., Wilms tumor, hepatoblastoma, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma), omphalocele, neonatal hypoglycemia, ear creases/pits, adrenocortical cytomegaly, and renal abnormalities (e.g., medullary dysplasia, nephrocalcinosis, medullary sponge kidney, and nephromegaly). Early death may occur from complications of prematurity, hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, macroglossia, or tumors. However, the previously reported mortality of 20% is likely an overestimate given better recognition of the disorder along with enhanced treatment options. Macroglossia and macrosomia are generally present at birth but may have postnatal onset. Growth rate slows around age seven to eight years. Hemihyperplasia may affect segmental regions of the body or selected organs and tissues. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2562
Concept ID:
C0004903
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Friedreich ataxia 1

Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is characterized by slowly progressive ataxia with mean onset between age ten and 15 years and usually before age 25 years. FRDA is typically associated with dysarthria, muscle weakness, spasticity in the lower limbs, scoliosis, bladder dysfunction, absent lower limb reflexes, and loss of position and vibration sense. Approximately two thirds of individuals with FRDA have cardiomyopathy; up to 30% have diabetes mellitus; and approximately 25% have an "atypical" presentation with later onset or retained tendon reflexes. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
383962
Concept ID:
C1856689
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hereditary hemochromatosis

HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE-HH) is characterized by inappropriately high absorption of iron by the gastrointestinal mucosa. The phenotypic spectrum of HFE-HH is now recognized to include Those with clinical HFE-HH, in which manifestations of end-organ damage secondary to iron storage are present; Those with biochemical HFE-HH, in which the only evidence of iron overload is increased transferrin-iron saturation and increased serum ferritin concentration; and Non-expressing p.Cys282Tyr homozygotes in whom neither clinical manifestations of HFE-HH nor iron overload are present. Clinical HFE-HH is characterized by excessive storage of iron in the liver, skin, pancreas, heart, joints, and testes. In untreated individuals: early symptoms may include abdominal pain, weakness, lethargy, and weight loss; the risk of cirrhosis is significantly increased when the serum ferritin is higher than 1,000 ng/mL; other findings may include progressive increase in skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure and/or arrhythmias, arthritis, and hypogonadism. Clinical HFE-HH is more common in men than women. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140272
Concept ID:
C0392514
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has been reported in some individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
266149
Concept ID:
C1275081
Congenital Abnormality
8.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1A

LMNA-related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is caused by mutations in LMNA and is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and reduced systolic function preceded or accompanied by significant conduction system disease and/or arrhythmias. LMNA-related DCM usually presents in early to mid-adulthood with symptomatic conduction system disease or arrhythmias, or with symptomatic DCM including heart failure or embolus from a left ventricular mural thrombus. Sudden cardiac death can occur, and in some instances is the presenting manifestation; sudden cardiac death may occur with little systolic dysfunction. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
258500
Concept ID:
C1449563
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Costello syndrome

Costello syndrome is characterized by failure to thrive in infancy as a result of severe postnatal feeding difficulties; short stature; developmental delay or intellectual disability; coarse facial features (full lips, large mouth, full nasal tip); curly or sparse, fine hair; loose, soft skin with deep palmar and plantar creases; papillomata of the face and perianal region; diffuse hypotonia and joint laxity with ulnar deviation of the wrists and fingers; tight Achilles tendons; and cardiac involvement including: cardiac hypertrophy (usually typical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [HCM]), congenital heart defect (usually valvar pulmonic stenosis), and arrhythmia (usually supraventricular tachycardia, especially chaotic atrial rhythm/multifocal atrial tachycardia or ectopic atrial tachycardia). Relative or absolute macrocephaly is typical, and postnatal cerebellar overgrowth can result in the development of a Chiari I malformation with associated anomalies including hydrocephalus or syringomyelia. Individuals with Costello syndrome have an approximately 15% lifetime risk for malignant tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma in young children and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in adolescents and young adults. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
108454
Concept ID:
C0587248
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Glycogen storage disease, type II

Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II), or Pompe disease, is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Classic infantile-onset Pompe disease may be apparent in utero but more often presents in the first two months of life with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, cardiomegaly and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hearing loss. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), classic infantile-onset Pompe disease commonly results in death in the first year of life from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction. The non-classic variant of infantile-onset Pompe disease usually presents within the first year of life with motor delays and/or slowly progressive muscle weakness, typically resulting in death from ventilatory failure in early childhood. Cardiomegaly can be seen, but heart disease is not a major source of morbidity. Late-onset (i.e., childhood, juvenile, and adult-onset) Pompe disease is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon in the late-onset form. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Becker muscular dystrophy

The dystrophinopathies include a spectrum of muscle disease caused by mutations in DMD, which encodes the protein dystrophin. The mild end of the spectrum includes the phenotypes of asymptomatic increase in serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and muscle cramps with myoglobinuria and isolated quadriceps myopathy. The severe end of the spectrum includes progressive muscle diseases that are classified as Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy when skeletal muscle is primarily affected and as DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) when the heart is primarily affected. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) usually presents in early childhood with delayed milestones, including delays in sitting and standing independently. Proximal weakness causes a waddling gait and difficulty climbing. DMD is rapidly progressive, with affected children being wheelchair dependent by age 12 years. Cardiomyopathy occurs in individuals with DMD after age 18 years. Few survive beyond the third decade, with respiratory complications and cardiomyopathy being common causes of death. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by later-onset skeletal muscle weakness; individuals remain ambulatory into their 20s. Despite the milder skeletal muscle involvement, heart failure from DCM is a common cause of morbidity and the most common cause of death in BMD. Mean age of death is in the mid-40s. DMD-associated DCM is characterized by left ventricular dilation and congestive heart failure. Females heterozygous for a DMD mutation are at increased risk for DCM. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
182959
Concept ID:
C0917713
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Propionic acidemia

The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by poor feeding, vomiting, and somnolence in the first days of life in a previously healthy infant, followed by lethargy, seizures, coma, and death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Late-onset PA includes developmental regression, chronic vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and occasionally basal ganglia infarction (resulting in dystonia and choreoathetosis) and cardiomyopathy. Affected children can have an acute decompensation that resembles the neonatal presentation and is precipitated by a catabolic stress such as infection, injury, or surgery. Isolated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), and chronic renal failure. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I

PMM2-CDG (CDG-Ia) (previously known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1a), the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three stages: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The three stages notwithstanding, clinical presentation and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly involved adults. Clinical presentations tend to be similar in siblings. In the infantile multisystem stage, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay; feeding problems, vomiting, and diarrhea with failure to thrive; and impaired growth. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical presentations are observed: (1) a non-fatal neurologic form with strabismus, psychomotor retardation, and cerebellar hypoplasia in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade and (2) a neurologic-multivisceral form with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia-intellectual disability stage, with onset between age three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability stage, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, thoracic and spinal deformities progress, and premature aging is observed; females lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hyperglycemia-induced growth hormone release, hyperprolactinemia, insulin resistance, and coagulopathy may occur. An increased risk of deep venous thrombosis is present. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Mitochondrial complex I deficiency

Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzymatic defect of the oxidative phosphorylation disorders (McFarland et al., 2004; Kirby et al., 2004). It causes a wide range of clinical disorders, ranging from lethal neonatal disease to adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. Phenotypes include macrocephaly with progressive leukodystrophy, nonspecific encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, liver disease, Leigh syndrome (256000), Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (535000), and some forms of Parkinson disease (see 556500) (Loeffen et al., 2000; Pitkanen et al., 1996; Robinson, 1998). Genetic Heterogeneity of Complex I Deficiency Mitochondrial complex I deficiency shows extreme genetic heterogeneity and can be caused by mutation in nuclear-encoded genes or in mitochondrial-encoded genes. There are no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations, and inference of the underlying basis from the clinical or biochemical presentation is difficult, if not impossible (summary by Haack et al., 2012). However, the majority of cases are caused by mutations in nuclear-encoded genes (Loeffen et al., 2000; Triepels et al., 2001). Complex I deficiency with autosomal recessive inheritance results from mutation in nuclear-encoded subunit genes, including NDUFV1 (161015), NDUFV2 (600532), NDUFS1 (157655), NDUFS2 (602985), NDUFS3 (603846), NDUFS4 (602694), NDUFS6 (603848), NDUFS7 (601825), NDUFS8 (602141), NDUFA2 (602137), NDUFA11 (612638), NDUFAF3 (612911), NDUFA10 (603835), NDUFB3 (603839), NDUFB9 (601445), and the complex I assembly genes B17.2L (609653), HRPAP20 (611776), C20ORF7 (612360), NUBPL (613621), and NDUFAF1 (606934). The disorder can also be caused by mutation in other nuclear-encoded genes, including FOXRED1 (613622), ACAD9 (611103; see 611126), and MTFMT (611766; see 256000). X-linked inheritance is observed with mutations in the NDUFA1 gene (300078). Complex I deficiency with mitochondrial inheritance has been associated with mutation in 6 mitochondrial-encoded components of complex I: MTND1 (516000), MTND2 (516001), MTND3 (516002), MTND4 (516003), MTND5 (516005), MTND6 (516006). Most of these patients have a phenotype of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON; 535000) or Leigh syndrome (256000). Features of complex I deficiency may also be caused by mutation in other mitochondrial genes, including MTTS2 (590085). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
374101
Concept ID:
C1838979
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Diabetes mellitus AND insipidus with optic atrophy AND deafness

WFS1-related disorders range from Wolfram syndrome (WFS) to WFS1-related low-frequency sensory hearing loss (also known as DFNA6/14/38 low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss [LFSNHL]). WFS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before age 16 years, and typically associated with sensorineural hearing loss, progressive neurologic abnormalities (cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychiatric illness, and urinary tract atony), and other endocrine abnormalities. Median age at death is 30 years. WFS-like disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric illness, and variable optic atrophy. WFS1-related LFSNHL is characterized by congenital, nonsyndromic, slowly progressive, low-frequency (<2000 Hz) sensorineural hearing loss. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21923
Concept ID:
C0043207
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Williams syndrome

Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to failure to thrive in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Congenital Abnormality
17.

Tyrosinemia type I

Untreated tyrosinemia type I usually presents either in young infants with severe liver involvement or later in the first year with liver dysfunction and renal tubular dysfunction associated with growth failure and rickets. Untreated children may have repeated, often unrecognized, neurologic crises lasting one to seven days that can include change in mental status, abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, and/or respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Death in the untreated child usually occurs before age ten years, typically from liver failure, neurologic crisis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Combined treatment with nitisinone and a low-tyrosine diet has resulted in a greater than 90% survival rate, normal growth, improved liver function, prevention of cirrhosis, correction of renal tubular acidosis, and improvement in secondary rickets. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75688
Concept ID:
C0268490
Disease or Syndrome
18.

beta Thalassemia

Beta-thalassemia (ß-thalassemia) is characterized by reduced synthesis of the hemoglobin subunit beta (hemoglobin beta chain) that results in microcytic hypochromic anemia, an abnormal peripheral blood smear with nucleated red blood cells, and reduced amounts of hemoglobin A (HbA) on hemoglobin analysis. Individuals with thalassemia major have severe anemia and hepatosplenomegaly; they usually come to medical attention within the first two years of life. Without treatment, affected children have severe failure to thrive and shortened life expectancy. Treatment with a regular transfusion program and chelation therapy, aimed at reducing transfusion iron overload, allows for normal growth and development and may improve the overall prognosis. Individuals with thalassemia intermedia present later and have milder anemia that only rarely requires transfusion. These individuals are at risk for iron overload secondary to increased intestinal absorption of iron as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2611
Concept ID:
C0005283
Disease or Syndrome
19.

3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type 2

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke . [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
107893
Concept ID:
C0574083
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Methylmalonic aciduria due to methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficiency

Isolated methylmalonic acidemia/aciduria is caused by complete or partial deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (mut(0) enzymatic subtype or mut(–) enzymatic subtype, respectively), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, or cblD variant 2 type), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. Onset of the manifestations of isolated methylmalonic acidemia/aciduria ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. All phenotypes demonstrate periods of relative health and intermittent metabolic decompensation, usually associated with intercurrent infections and stress. In the neonatal period the disease can present with lethargy, vomiting, hypotonia, hypothermia, respiratory distress, severe ketoacidosis, hyperammonemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia and can result in death. In the infantile/non-B12-responsive phenotype, the most common form, infants are normal at birth but develop lethargy, vomiting, dehydration, hepatomegaly, hypotonia, and encephalopathy. An intermediate B12-responsive phenotype can occasionally present in neonates, but usually presents in the first months or years of life; affected children exhibit anorexia, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay, and sometimes have protein aversion and/or vomiting and lethargy after protein intake. Atypical and "benign"/adult methylmalonic acidemia are associated with increased, albeit mild, urinary excretion of methylmalonate; however, it is uncertain if some of these individuals will develop symptoms. Major secondary complications of methylmalonic acidemia include developmental delay (variable); tubulointerstitial nephritis with progressive renal failure; “metabolic stroke” (acute and chronic basal ganglia involvement); disabling movement disorder with choreoathetosis, dystonia, and para/quadriparesis; pancreatitis; growth failure; functional immune impairment; and optic nerve atrophy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
344424
Concept ID:
C1855114
Disease or Syndrome

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